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An Iliad: A Story of War ePub download

by Ann Goldstein,Alessandro Baricco

  • Author: Ann Goldstein,Alessandro Baricco
  • ISBN: 1841959014
  • ISBN13: 978-1841959016
  • ePub: 1794 kb | FB2: 1362 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Publisher: Canongate Books (August 2, 2007)
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 527
  • Format: docx txt lrf lit
An Iliad: A Story of War ePub download

It is this statement by Lukács that inspired Alessandro Baricco, the bestselling author of Without Blood and Silk, to make the great Homeric poem of the Trojan War contemporary.

It is this statement by Lukács that inspired Alessandro Baricco, the bestselling author of Without Blood and Silk, to make the great Homeric poem of the Trojan War contemporary. By stripping away the skirmishing, the whimsicality, and the petty meddling of Zeus and the other gods, Baricco transforms a story that has haunted Western cultures for thousands of years. In an attempt to create The novel is the epic of a world deserted by the gods.

Alessandro Baricco re-creates the siege of Troy through the voices of 21 Homeric characters. Sacrificing none of Homer’s panoramic scope, Baricco forgoes Homer’s detachment and admits us to realms of subjective experience his predecessor never explored. From the return of Chryseis to the burial of Hector, we see through human eyes and feel with human hearts the unforgettable events first recounted more than 3,000 years ago events arranged not by the whims of the gods in this instance but by the dictates of human nature. Canongate Books, 8 февр.

by Alessandro Baricco & translated by Ann Goldstein . But Baricco describes such actions superbly, and creates a persuasive atmosphere of character-driven impending doom. And Goldstein’s vivid translation conjures some spectacular visual effects (. ran wild, pulling empty chariots and mourning their drivers, who now lay on the ground, more loved by the vultures than by their wives ). Both celebration and condemnation of war, this Iliad manages to speak to yet another generation that needs desperately to hear its message. Pub Date: Aug. 4th, 2006.

Entertainment Weekly.

Alessandro Baricco re-creates the siege of Troy through the voices of twenty-one Homeric characters in the narrative idiom of our modern imagination. Baricco's text lingers on the futility of an unending war, and casts the arrival of the thousand-odd ships as an invasion by an overwhelmingly superior force, met by young recruits throwing stones. Entertainment Weekly.

Alessandro Baricco is an Italian writer, director and performer whose work has become famous throughout Europe. Translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein

Alessandro Baricco is an Italian writer, director and performer whose work has become famous throughout Europe. He has been a music critic for La Repubblica and La Stampa, and his novels have been bestsellers in Italy and France. He has won, among other things, the prestigious Prix Médicis étranger and the Premio Viareggio. Translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein. Alessandro Maria Nacar occupies himself with everything - in fashion, in advertising, in places - that catches his eye. This is his first illustrated book.

Silk: A Story of War. Canongate.

She is best known for her translations of Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan Quartet. Silk: A Story of War.

In An Iliad, Alessandro Baricco re-creates the siege .

In An Iliad, Alessandro Baricco re-creates the siege of Troy through the voices of twenty-one Homeric characters, in the narrative idiom of our modern imagination. The author of the international bestseller Silk now delivers a ravishing and wildly inventive novel about friendship, genius and its discontents, and the redemptive power of narrative.

Baricco has written an Iliad for his time, a wonderful, gripping take on a story that has haunted our culture since it. .Ann Goldstein has translated works by, among others, authors Roberto Calasso, Alessandro Baricco, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Aldo Buzzi

Baricco has written an Iliad for his time, a wonderful, gripping take on a story that has haunted our culture since it was first told. Alessandro Baricco re-creates the siege of Troy through the voices of 21 Homeric characters. Ann Goldstein has translated works by, among others, authors Roberto Calasso, Alessandro Baricco, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Aldo Buzzi. She has been the recipient of the PEN Renato Poggioli Translation Award.

Silk: A Story of War by Alessandro Baricco (Paperback, 2006). Additional Product Features. Place of Publication.

By (author) Alessandro Baricco; Translated by Ann Goldstein.

A bold reimagining of our civilization’s greatest tale of war, by the author of the acclaimed best seller Silk.Alessandro Baricco re-creates the siege of Troy through the voices of twenty-one Homeric characters in the narrative idiom of our modern imagination. Sacrificing none of Homer’s panoramic scope, Baricco forgoes Homeric detachment and admits us to realms of subjective experience his predecessor never explored. From the return of Chryseis to the burial of Hector, we see through human eyes and feel with human hearts the unforgettable events first recounted almost three thousand years ago—events arranged not by the whims of the gods in this instance but by the dictates of human nature. With Andromache, Patroclus, Priam, and the rest, we are privy to the ghastly confusion of battle, the clamor of princely councils, the intimacies of the bedchamber—until finally only a blind poet is left to recount, secondhand, the awful fall of Ilium. Imbuing the stuff of legend with a startling new relevancy and humanity, Baricco gives us The Iliad as we have never known it. His transformative achievement is certain to delight and fascinate all readers of Homer’s indispensable classic.
Fenritaur
This is not a translation of The Iliad as much as it a reimaging. We are presented with a view of the epic through a 21st century literary mirror. Baricco has taken a faithful interpretation of the epic (by Maria Grazia Ciani) and stripped away the intentional redundancies and the Gods and replaced it with deeply human voices without losing any of the depth, beauty or brutality of the original. This is a real accomplishment. I would not supplant THE Iliad for AN Iliad, but it is certainly a moving and wholly accurate experience for any reader.
Go ahead and buy it, and you will return to it and give it to others for years to come.
Zulkigis
Entertaining on its own it makes a wonderful text to practice your Italian if you read it along with the Italian version much of which is available on Google books, look for:

Omero, Iliade, on Google Books

[...]

I am an intermediate student of Italian. I find the translation from Italian to English to be quite literal and the Italian is straightforward so I recommend the two as a parallel reader. The fact that the original Homeric story is well known and well told helps.
Vozuru
This is a very interesting interpretation of the Iliad. Clear and very readable. He also caught the immediacy and excitement of the story. I thoroughly enjoyed this.
Zainian
I was hoping for a translation that was more of a story than prose and this is it. Very well done. The buildup is good but the ending seems rushed through. No mention of Achilles death was a bit disappointing.
Bloodfire
This is a great spin off the Iliad; the author takes you inside the minds, and feelings, of some of the major players in The Iliad. You will step inside their mind, and live through them...almost like being part of history. Very nice...
Tholmeena
If you think you know all about the Iliad, Baricco's book will delight you with the insights it brings to this oft told tale. A retelling of the masterpiece from the perspective of the participants, this delightful volume is another great example of Baricco's imagination.
Mr.Death
I read the introduction and first chapter and was so angry I had to stop. The author states that he wanted to create a version of the "Iliad" more accessible to a general audience and written from the perspective of several characters, some of whom never get a chance to speak in the epic. I assumed he had something like John Gardner's "Grendel" in mind. Apparently, however, the author thinks his intended audience is either too stupid to understand the "Iliad" or lacks the attention span to get very far into it. He's written an incredibly lifeless summary of the events of the Iliad, in the exact same order they occur, but regularly changes the narrator. Agamemnon's threatening dismissal of Chryses in Book I is a literal, word-for-word translation of the original text which any undergraduate student studying Ancient Greek could have produced; how this is even possible in a book that is an English translation of an Italian translation of a Greek text is mind boggling. Here's a quick summation of the first chapter: "Hi, my name is Chryseis, this is what happens in Book I of the 'Iliad'." You could substitute any other random character and get the same result; there is no new perspective offered at all. The author also includes his own additions to the story, which are nothing more than contrived, "dramatic" twists that, in my opinion, demonstrate a complete lack of respect for or understanding of the impact the Homeric epics have had on Western Civilization. For example, (spoiler alert) at the end of Chryseis' chapter, we find out that she would have preferred to stay with Agamemnon rather than go back home because, surprise!, her father likes to rape her. What this adds to the story is beyond me and seems to have been inserted purely for shock and entertainment value (i.e., wow, who saw that coming!). In short, pick one of the dozens of translations available that actually honor the source material, and do not waste your time with this garbage.
I've tried reading the Iliad a couple of times and found myself reading excerpts and just what I needed to get by in my classics class in college. In other words, it was a chore to read. This book was a pleasure to read, and you probably won't believe this, frankly I'm having a hard time believing it myself, but I read this book in less than a day and a half. I couldn't put it down. Better than any hollywood movie, this version of The Trojan War, the original or rather based on the original I understand by Homer, has scenes that Stephen King fans could admire. Alessandro Baricco is a genious turning a tale that has bored many students down through the years into an epic tale that will haunt you many days after the last page has turned. The author mentions that he orally recited this book in Rome and that it was broadcast on radio there and that listeners were held spellbound. I believe that, as I too was held spellbound. However I feel I should mention that this tale is not for the faint of heart. Who knew the ancient Greeks were so violent and bloodthristy? If Hollywood did make a movie of this rendering they'd have to create a new rating for violence. The battle descriptions here are in your face and low down dirty. A good look at war in ancient times and probably not too far from the truth or violence of war today. This is one not to miss!!
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