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The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold ePub download

by Evelyn Waugh,Quentin Blake

  • Author: Evelyn Waugh,Quentin Blake
  • ISBN: 0140017941
  • ISBN13: 978-0140017946
  • ePub: 1832 kb | FB2: 1367 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; First Thus edition (1962)
  • Pages: 224
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 457
  • Format: mobi lit azw lit
The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold ePub download

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Home Evelyn Waugh The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold. The ordeal of gilbert p. .The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold, . The Pinfolds were addicted to nicknames and each of these surrounding families had its own private, unsuspected appellation at Lychpole, not malicious but mildly derisive, taking its origin in most cases from some half-forgotten incident in the past. Then Mr. Pinfold tormented them in his turn by making gibberish of the text, reading alternate lines, alternate words, reading backwards, until they pleaded for a respite. 3. Hour after hour Mr. Pinfold remorselessly read on. On his last evening he felt magnanimous towards all except Angel and Goneril. So it was not Glover’s gramophone. As he changed, Mr. Pinfold considered the matter. During the war he had travelled in troopships which were fitted with amplifiers on every deck. A funereal limousine bore them to Kew.

The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold. The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold is a novel by the British writer Evelyn Waugh, first published in July 1957.

Like the eponymous Gilbert Pinfold, Evelyn Waugh was feeling ill and, suffering from insomnia, self-medicated with . From the opening chapter, The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold is a revealing self-portrait of a particular period in the talented author’s own life.

Like the eponymous Gilbert Pinfold, Evelyn Waugh was feeling ill and, suffering from insomnia, self-medicated with powerful sleeping draughts and alcohol. Waugh decided to escape an English winter with a trip to Ceylon, but once aboard ship, he began to have auditory hallucinations that ranged (in his fictionalised As a al work of fiction", perhaps The Ordeal Of Gilbert Pinfold can only really be understood and appreciated through the lens of the author's real life ordeal.

Waugh starts the book off in high style with Pinfold at his most recognizably Waugh-like and entertaining, avoiding his neighbors and unhappily being interviewed by BBC Radio. Readers of earlier Waugh novels like "A Handful Of Dust" and "Scoop" will recognize his comic take on the sedate rural life. There was a phrase in the '30s, 'It's later than you think', which was designed to cause uneasiness," Waugh writes. It was never later than Mr. Pinfold thought.

Gilbert Pinfold is a reclusive Catholic novelist suffering from acute inertia. The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold is a masterpiece of self-portraiture, one of the very best in English fiction. John Bailey ). A masterpiece. In an attempt to defeat insomnia he has been imbibing an unappetizing cocktail of bromide, chloral, and creme de menthe. Almost as soon as the gangplank lifts, Pinfold hears sounds coming out of the ceiling of his cabin: wild jazz bands, barking dogs, and loud revival meetings.

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Gavirgas
I love several of Waugh's novels but this is my favorite, even surpassing A Handful of Dust and The Loved One in its comic darkness. Perhaps because it is semi-autobiographical it's more entertaining to read the bizarre experience of Mr. Pinfold, who seems to be Waugh himself, Catholic convert and not-so-genial misanthrope.

Gilbert Pinfold has a serious drinking problem exacerbated by liberal mis-use of prescription drugs but decides a sea voyage is just the ticket to help him kick his habit(s). Although he's not feeling too well beforehand (all the brandy with bromide & chloral may have something to do with it) he decides sea air will make him a new man tout de suite and books passage on the S.S. Caliban. Before his cruise he reluctantly agrees to an interview with a BBC interviewer named Angel who comes to his home with a "box" to record the conversation for later broadcast. The box appears later on in a more sinister setting.

Almost as soon as he boards ship he's hearing music and even voices in his cabin (and a dog "snuffling" in the adjacent cabin). He assumes the Caliban is a war ship retrofitted after the war and remnants of a communication system must be randomly projecting conversations from various areas. Many are derogatorily aimed at him and he believes he's generally reviled by his fellow passengers although he can't quite manage to identify any in person in the dining room or bar or on the deck. He overhears the brutal mistreatment and resulting death of one of the ship's foreign crew by the Captain and a woman he dubs "Goneril" and is perplexed by the dilemma since he seems to have no allies on board except possibly a pair of fellow Brit military veterans... whose identities also elude him. There's a group of young people, "hooligans" who plague him with their incessant, loud music and vocal plans to attack him for the coward they know he is (he's also suspected of being Jewish Communist and a homosexual, of the "butch" variety). Then there's Margaret, a sweet young nurse who falls in love with him and implores him to reciprocate but never appears in the flesh. The BBC fellow Angel, and his box, is also on board plotting against him with the others but, alas, never shows himself in the flesh.

Soon he's hearing conversations all over the ship, some from the faulty communication lines but many overheard in passing. What they say to his face and what he hears behind his back are polar opposites and he's regularly trying to discern some hidden, malicious meaning while conversing face to face with people he knows despise him based on his inadvertent eavesdropping. He wants to refuse to sit at the Captain's table but cannot think of a plausible excuse - he can't let the Captain (or the invisible Goneril) know he's aware of the crew member's torture and death and several conversational ploys to elicit more information only make him feel more a jackanapes than he did already.

After reading what I've written even I am bored by my description so I'll stop here. The Kindle edition of the novel came out a while back and contains extra material, including a 1960 BBC interview about the novel. My favorite quote is Waugh's reaction to critics -- "...I'm afraid if someone praises me I think 'What an ass,' and if they abuse me I think 'What an ass.' "
Jarortr
Not a favourite Waugh by a long, long shalk - but a fascinating account of a mental breakdown. There is an unbeliuevably weighty and selfp-regarding Introduction, NOT by Waugh, in this edition.
Folsa
This book is the memoir/fictionalization of a nervous breakdown, so it isn't always delightful reading or listening. This is very well-done, and I love the way hearing this makes the narrator very present and the events very realistic.
Mamuro
Evelyn Waugh's last stand-alone novel, published in 1957 nine years before his death, offers Waugh fans a glimpse of the genius satirist mocking himself. For others, it may be hard to retain interest in what amounts to a novel without much of a plot.

Gilbert Pinfold is a well-regarded novelist, from a generation of writers where there was "so much will and so much ability to please". Now being swept away by the Angry Young Men, he putters around his country estate popping various pills and chemicals to help him sleep. He also drinks a little. To clear his head and work on his latest book, he settles on a cruise to Ceylon. Yet as he undertakes his voyage, he hears disembodied voices calling him various rude things. Has poor Gilbert lost his mind?

"You just pretend to be hard and worldly, don't you?" demands one of the accusing voices. "And you can't blame people if they take you at your own estimate."

Waugh starts the book off in high style with Pinfold at his most recognizably Waugh-like and entertaining, avoiding his neighbors and unhappily being interviewed by BBC Radio. Readers of earlier Waugh novels like "A Handful Of Dust" and "Scoop" will recognize his comic take on the sedate rural life.

"There was a phrase in the '30s, 'It's later than you think', which was designed to cause uneasiness," Waugh writes. "It was never later than Mr. Pinfold thought. At intervals during the day and night he would look at his watch and learn with disappointment how little of his life was past, how much was still ahead of him."

Once Pinfold gets on board the ship, the novel quickly becomes a more surreal and less successful farce. Pinfold imagines various atrocities being committed on the S.S. Caliban which he alone can hear, many targeting him. There are amusing highlights, but the hallucinogenic episodes seem to take the character of endless tape loops, like a long chapter where Pinfold is accused of being Jewish and gay by a pair of louts who conveniently vanish into thin air whenever Pinfold tries to confront them.

Aside from occasionally running outside his cabin blackthorn cane in hand, Pinfold's reactions are too subdued or mild for any real comic payoff. Sometimes, as when he hears himself being denounced on a radio broadcast, Pinfold doesn't react at all, which kills the point. Waugh skips the intricate plotting of his past novels to mimic a narcotic dream, not the first or last Englishman to do so, but this comes in the form of stop-and-go fragments rather than a fantasy on par with "Kubla Khan" or "A Day In The Life".

That may reflect the nature of the substance Pinfold/Waugh was abusing. Yet the result is curiously unsatisfying, like Waugh published this a draft too soon.

The novel does wrap things up on a pleasant note, and there is some mystery in the identity of one of the voices which lingers after the book is over. Nothing else does, though. "Pinfold" entertains, especially if you know a bit about Waugh going in, but he played better off himself in other less obvious works.
MilsoN
The introduction praises Waugh's writing skills in this book, but while they may well be equal to anything he had done, the result is a pretty dreary book.
Justie
Got 15 books as a Christmas gift -all Evelyn Waugh. Trying to collect them all.. What can I say but a good read!!!!
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