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Sheepshagger ePub download

by Niall. Griffiths

  • Author: Niall. Griffiths
  • ISBN: 0224061054
  • ISBN13: 978-0224061056
  • ePub: 1916 kb | FB2: 1164 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Publisher: Jonathan Cape, (2001)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 632
  • Format: docx azw mobi lrf
Sheepshagger ePub download

Niall Griffiths (born 1966) is an English author of novels and short stories, set predominantly in Wales

Niall Griffiths (born 1966) is an English author of novels and short stories, set predominantly in Wales. His best known works include his first two novels Grits and Sheepshagger, and his 2003 publication Stump which won the Wales Book of the Year award. As a nine-year-old boy Griffiths found a second-hand copy of a novel by Rhondda writer Ron Berry in a junk shop

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Though his project bears linguistic and political similarities, that novel was much more than Trainspotting set in Aberystwyth: layer by layer, using the different voices and perceptual shifts of its main characters, it built an utterly convincing world, founded upon a mythic yet exact comprehension of the Welsh landscape.

Niall Griffiths’s most popular book is Post Office. Sheepshagger by. Niall Griffiths. Kelly + Victor by.

Niall Griffiths Sheepshagger. 3 people like this topic. Want to like this Page?

A hymn both ancient and modern to place and to unsentimental belonging".

A hymn both ancient and modern to place and to unsentimental belonging". A powerful blend of expletive-ridden dialogue and passages of beautiful prose- quite brilliant".

by. Griffiths, Niall, 1966-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on August 23, 2011. New York : Thomas Dunne Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Sheepshagger is the story of Ianto: the inarticulate, inbred, ignoble savage

Sheepshagger is the story of Ianto: the inarticulate, inbred, ignoble savage. It is also the story of Ianto the seer, the visionary who comprehends Nature with a Blakean intensity, at one with the world he lives in. The novel is both these stories, both these people, and the character that emerges is one of the great creations of contemporary fiction

This is the story of Ianto: the feral, inarticulate, inbred, ignoble savage; haunter of mountains, killer of innocents.

This is the story of Ianto: the feral, inarticulate, inbred, ignoble savage; haunter of mountains, killer of innocents . and, quite frankly, it didn't dissapointed me, like many other young prosaics tend to do, so I kinda approached this book with pre-empashized enthusiasm, expecting to read, at least, book in a artistic height of Deadkidsongs.

Hra
Loved this book. The slang took some getting used to but it really lent to to the story for me. The violence while explicitaand shocking is well written and not over the top for the rage implied at all the character had endured. I think this book speaks to so much of what happens every day especially here in the US.
LONUDOG
Not much to add to what's been written... I'd downplay how much this is a novel about "revenge" and class-rage, as some of the editorial remarks seem to make it, tho'. While there are elements of both, and a fierce subtextual current of resentment towards the English presence in Wales, that run thru the book, to reduce the novel to such simplicities -- to sum it up as that and nothing more -- does it a grave injustice; the book is far more ambitious in scope, and one shouldn't ignore that for the sake of a tidy blurb. Time and again in the novel, the violence in it is connected to a singular vision of nature, red in tooth and claw; to a darkness in the universe, drawn in near-mythic terms; and to a history of childhood trauma that the main character, Ianto suffers; all of these are very much apart from his class or his dispossession. This ISN'T primarily a political text... On a quite separate note, I wanted to briefly note one important difference between Niall Griffiths and SHEEPSHAGGER and the novels of Cormac McCarthy. Unlike CHILD OF GOD, the obvious comparison-point (and a relevant one, in talking about this book -- since it is linked not just in terms of the superficial action and elaborate prose it shares with that book, but thematically, on at least a few counts), there are passages in this novel where Griffiths', the reader's, and one of Griffith's Welsh character's hearts are very much moved, are filled with sympathy and compassion for Ianto; where we are asked to understand and forgive his violence, and embrace him regardless of it. (Given the brutality of the murders in the book, and the detail in which they are drawn, this is no small accomplishment). While Lester Ballard is richly human and not treated unsympathetically, there is an absurdity to his figure, as drawn by McCarthy -- there's a level on which CHILD OF GOD comes across as a self-consciously black joke, proposing a rapacious, dim hillbilly necrophiliac as an innocent, and making him a protagonist; while we can understand Ballard's actions, we do so only by virtue of our capacity to find his baser aspects in ourselves, such that CHILD OF GOD stands (sort of) as a lesson in humility, a joke at our own expense as much as Ballard's. I might be going a bit too far here (it's been awhile since I read the book) but there seems to me to be something in it -- CHILD OF GOD, that is -- that borders on the misanthropic -- in a subdued but gleeful way. SHEEPSHAGGER does nothing of the sort; Griffiths compassion is sincere, and his concern is to raise his damaged protagonist to a level on par with any of us -- not to lower us to his basenesses. Don't get me wrong: I greatly admire McCarthy's books, and liked CHILD OF GOD immensely; and it's indeed more IMPORTANT a work than this book, even if only because it stands as the "original" text of dispossession, necrophilia, and near feral humanity. I ended up liking this novel in entirely other ways, for other reasons, however; and whatever one feels about McCarthy or the relationship between CHILD OF GOD and this -- it shouldn't matter in the end, at least not to the decision of whether to read SHEEPSHAGGER or not... People who enjoy McCarthy's books shouldn't be put off with the thought that this is just an imitation; whatever Griffiths "lifts," and his debt is such that he really should've tipped his hat to McCarthy in his acknowledgments, he does so in the service of a unique work with its own merits, that does things CHILD OF GOD doesn't attempt. Those who don't enjoy McCarthy's books, meanwhile, but are interested in reading a surprisingly moving portrait of a damaged, but very human character (and the people and landscape around him, both of which are also important to this work) -- will also find this novel worth their while; it's a good book, a good read, quite compelling. .... On a final note: to be totally pedantic, and split hairs with another reviewer, there is, in fact, ONE misplaced word in the text -- Griffiths slips and uses the non-word "irregardless" at one point. But then, there are also at least two typos in BLOOD MERIDIAN, too.
Kefym
This is a grim yet sometimes comic tale about a young Welsh man, Ianto, or sheep shagger as some English call him in the book, whose misfortunes and troubles cause a lot of mayhem.
Told in various strands of narrative this is a demanding read as much as it is a very gripping and entertaining one. One strand consists of nothing but uncommented dialogue between some friends of our protagonist. Spiked with lovable Welsh slang and characters these segments serve as interlude to the chronological telling of the lifestory of Ianto. He's lost his parents and his home to start with.
Another narrative tells the more recent troubles of Ianto, which had severe consequences.
The prose is amazing, very powerful and colourful. Sometimes a tour de force but always hugely engaging and hypnotic, this is a rare treat artistically and socio-culturally.
A real find.
lubov
I was introduced in english young prose by the "Deadkidsongs" by Toby Litt...and, quite frankly, it didn't dissapointed me, like many other young prosaics tend to do, so I kinda approached this book with pre-empashized enthusiasm, expecting to read, at least, book in a artistic height of Deadkidsongs. And surprisingly, I was not dissapointed.
So, why do I praise this book in the mere beggining?
If you start to consider literature as something that shouldn't be just plain fun, thing for which you grab when there's nothing on TV, or every damn CD in the house is broken, than you start to have grasp on things in ways more brilliant and astounding than you ever imagined it existed.
This book represents one world. Many would say, that it represents Wales, and political struggles of it's cittizens, and rustical, narcotic ways of life of its sheepshaggers. And, really it does. But what also does is that it represnts an inside world of a man, which is not man anymore, whose manliness whas denounced by traumatic events in his childhood days, it shows what happens when one grow to quick into a grown up man, and every conotation that is linked with that term.
Consider yourslef warned, that this is not easy book if you really want to dig yourself in one subconscoiusness (I'm sure I didn't spell that right :), you can read it in one afternoon but than you'll just stare blankly in its cover, not comprehending what actually happend...Take time to enjoy this work (I suppose GB slang should provide little difficulty, but I cannot be judge on that, I read it translated), take time to drown yourself into words that speaks beautiful and dark mysteries of life, in a words that are life itself.
2of2 for young english litterature