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The White Woman on the Green Bicycle ePub download

by Monique Roffey

  • Author: Monique Roffey
  • ISBN: 1847395228
  • ISBN13: 978-1847395221
  • ePub: 1965 kb | FB2: 1660 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd (April 20, 2010)
  • Pages: 448
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 964
  • Format: lrf rtf lit azw
The White Woman on the Green Bicycle ePub download

My reaction to The White Woman on the Green Bicycle can only be described as a mixed bag. There are parts I really liked and parts I didn't.

My reaction to The White Woman on the Green Bicycle can only be described as a mixed bag. Before this, I wasn't curious or even knowledgeable about Trinidad. The first thing I did after finishing this book was google Trinidad and read up as much as I could find on the internet.

The White Woman on a Green Bicycle is the simple yet complex story of a British/French ex-pat couple in Trinidad. Told from the wife's point of view it initiates the reader to the world of creole and white ex-pats in the Caribbean

The White Woman on a Green Bicycle is the simple yet complex story of a British/French ex-pat couple in Trinidad. Told from the wife's point of view it initiates the reader to the world of creole and white ex-pats in the Caribbean. The inevitable tale of Sabine and her husband George is haunting and evokes scenes that had me reaching for Google Images so I could actually see the landscape.

Monique Roffey's Orange Prize-shortlisted novel is a gripping portrait of postcolonialism that stands among great works by Caribbean writers like Jamaica Kincaid and Andrea Levy. When George and Sabine Harwood arrive in Trinidad from England, George is immediately seduced by the beguiling island, while Sabine feels isolated, heat-fatigued, and ill-at-ease.

She was hot-faced, salt tears flowing down her cheeks. She gushed out pieces of a story, something about her son Talbot, about a mobile phone, the police beating him up. ‘Sit down, sit down,’ Sabine. I’ll make you some te. Jennifer nodded, blinded by tears. Las week,’ Jennifer began through her sobs, ‘Talbot go to a fête. One o’ dem fine his mobile phone and tek it from him, fer himself. Bastards,’ Sabine spat.

Monique Roffey’s Trinidad is full of strife and languor, violence and also hushed moments of peace, so beautifully and lushly evoked that while I was reading . Other author's books: The White Woman on the Green Bicycle.

Monique Roffey’s Trinidad is full of strife and languor, violence and also hushed moments of peace, so beautifully and lushly evoked that while I was reading Trinidad became more real for me than my own neighborhood. What a vibrant, provocative, satisfying novel-I can’t stop thinking about it. -Suzanne Berne, Orange Prize winner. Monique Roffey was born in Port of Spain, Trinidad, and educated in the UK. Her highly acclaimed debut novel, Sun Dog, was published in 2002.

Monique Roffey was born in Port of Spain, Trinidad, and educated in the United Kingdom. The White Woman on the Green Bicycle, an Orange Prize finalist, is her second novel

Monique Roffey was born in Port of Spain, Trinidad, and educated in the United Kingdom. The White Woman on the Green Bicycle, an Orange Prize finalist, is her second novel. She is also the author of the novel Sun Dog. Roffey currently lives in Harlesden, north London, where she spends most of the day in her pajamas, writing. A CONVERSATION WITH MONIQUE ROFFEY Q. In an interview in The Guardian (London), you talked about your parents and their arrival in Trinidad-including the fact that your mother brought her green bicycle

Encompassing fifty years, The White Woman on the Green Bicycle introduces readers to the birth and early development of independence in Trinidad through the life story of an expatriate couple who arrived as colonialism left

Encompassing fifty years, The White Woman on the Green Bicycle introduces readers to the birth and early development of independence in Trinidad through the life story of an expatriate couple who arrived as colonialism left. just because the cover looks great (and has my name on it) (and the words "green bicycle"). TO READ: The White Woman on the Green Bicycle by Monique Roffey. Discover ideas about Pile Of Books

Monique Roffey's Orange Prize-shortlisted novel is a gripping portrait of postcolonialism that stands among great works by Caribbean writers like Jamaica Kincaid and Andrea Levy

Monique Roffey's Orange Prize-shortlisted novel is a gripping portrait of postcolonialism that stands among great works by Caribbean writers like Jamaica Kincaid and Andrea Levy. As they adapt to new circumstances, their marriage endures for better or worse, despite growing political unrest and racial tensions that affect their daily lives.

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When George and Sabine Harwood arrive in Trinidad from England George instantly takes to their new life, but Sabine feels isolated, heat-fatigued, and ill at ease with the racial segregation and the imminent dawning of a new era. Her only solace is her growing fixation with Eric Williams, the charismatic leader of Trinidad's new national party, to whom she pours out all her hopes and fears for the future in letters that she never brings herself to send. As the years progress, George and Sabine's marriage endures for better or worse. When George discovers Sabine's cache of letters, he realises just how many secrets she's kept from him - and he from her - over the decades. And he is seized by an urgent, desperate need to prove his love for her, with tragic consequences...
Faehn
The White Woman on the Green Bicycle by Monique Roffey is a multi-layered story of love and betrayal between a man and a woman, a man and a country, and a country and a politician. January, 1956 is a pivotal year for newlyweds, Sabine and George Hayward, and the island of Trinidad. Sabine and George have just arrived in Trinidad for a three-year job stint, as many other white men, hoping to enjoy a higher standard of living and position that was not attainable in England. Instantly, George falls in love with the island; after all he has the status of his work and being a white Englishman in a British colony. Sabine's initial reaction is how can she put up with the heat for three years, and without much of a support system feels even more isolated and tormented as no one will explain the protocol of all of the unwritten rules regarding the genders, the races, and the classes. So she takes to exploring the island on her green bicycle, oblivious to everyone's reaction to her exploring. Meanwhile, a charismatic intellect, Eric Williams, has formed the People's National Movement (PNM) fueling political unrest speaking to the chokehold of colonialism on Trinidad. The events of 1956 have an influence upon Sabine and George, and all that follows evolves from that point.

The structure of The White Woman on the Green Bicycle divides the story into four time periods, 2006, 1956, 1963, and 1970. And, the book actually begins with the 2006 section, which is at the end of Sabine's and George's life together, and many years after the independence movement. It opens on a violent strained period in both the marriage and the political climate in Trinidad. In this section the couple's relationship has a "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf" feel, especially since at this point I did not fully understand how Sabine and George evolved to this point in their relationship. This technique catches the reader unaware as the book goes on for several chapters for the 2006 period, providing an ending to the story as if told in chronological order. But, do not despair, as the best is yet to come, and you will be treated to a book with two endings. This was a gutsy decision by the author, but serves to help distinguish this book. The other timelines did an excellent job of seamlessly integrating political issues involving race, the legacy of colonialism and slavery with the personal conflicts Sabine and George experience in their marriage. Personally, I enjoyed the blending of fact with fiction, and having Eric Williams, the Mighty Sparrow meet with the fictional characters helped to engage the reader through the gradual revelation of the past.

Ms. Roffey has a keen eye for putting into words the lush verdant landscape of Trinidad, creating a strong sense of place by the vivid descriptions resulting in imagery that feels like you are looking at a photograph. When I finished reading the novel, I came away feeling Ms. Roffey's love of the island and grateful that she allowed me to be a voyeur to her Trinidad. I recommend this book to readers of literary fiction and West Indian novels.

Reviewed by Beverly
APOOO Literary Book Review
interactive man
How fun to follow these characters as expats transferred to Trinidad at the beginnings of the creation of a new independent island nation. The clash of foreigners and natives, plus those of mixed race and heritage make for a boiling pot that eventually leads to independence and then disappointment and then gradual acceptance and progress. Besides the struggles for independence is the marriage and how it develops, how the husband and wife begin to draw apart and seek their own ways of making life "work", the relationships and decisions concerning their children, friends and political leanings. It's a story told by many nations of their growing pains but this one has the heat and fire of the Caribbean, plus the British and other foreign groups taking what riches are there for the rest of the world, sometimes without regard for the island inhabitants who are left to deal with the consequences.
Bloodfire
Roffey is good at describing life on a tropical island and a post-colonial culture, but I found the characters unlikeable and many of the well written situations made little sense to me. Sabine's fixation on the Prime Minister and her lack of motion in any direction (except to abuse her husband) were off-putting. I also was distracted by the use of local dialect with no explanation of what they meant. For example steupsed was used in 20 or 30 scenes where the word was used to set the tone, before an explanation was given of what it meant. I am still unsure if cyan is positive or negative.

Read it if you are interested in the tropics or Trinidad, but don't expect a fast read, or any insight into the main characters.
Love Me
A friend told me about this book. She claimed that is was so different from anything she had every read so I decided I would order it. It is a book that you cannot read in one sitting. It is so different and informative that you have to take your time to absorb what you are reading. I learned a lot about Trinidad and the culture there. You will have to stop several times while reading it to grasp what you have read. The politics there in the 60's was so bad, it is hard to believe that people could live through it. I think you will enjoy reading this book, just take your time...
Saithinin
The White Woman on a Green Bicycle is the simple yet complex story of a British/French ex-pat couple in Trinidad. Told from the wife's point of view it initiates the reader to the world of creole and white ex-pats in the Caribbean.
The inevitable tale of Sabine and her husband George is haunting and evokes scenes that had me reaching for Google Images so I could actually see the landscape. A worthwhile quick read.
Windforge
For about 7/8 of the book, I was captivated by both the island of Trinidad and the very different reactions to it. The last 1/8 seemed flat to me. But I don't regret for a minute reading it. Our book group's discussion covered the book's psychological issues and its large racial and social issues. A good one for discussion. And certainly if the reader likes - or dislikes - the Caribbean. Or colonialism.
Stylish Monkey
I liked the book, despite its layered timelines that sometimes confused me. She is spot on in describing the Trinidad of the pre Independence and immediate post independence period.

Roffey is particularly courageous in skewering the Creole population. I recognized several relatives and she may wish she had camouflaged them better. She may have to take her own water and air with her on the next rip to Port of Spain.
I think this was a great story, but written in an odd way. There were times where I couldn't put this book down, and others where I was bored silly. I also felt that there was no closure at the end, because the closure was given at the beginning already. For someone who reads a lot, I would recommend it. For a casual reader, not so much.
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