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A Bigamist's Daughter ePub download

by Alice McDermott

  • Author: Alice McDermott
  • ISBN: 0747568251
  • ISBN13: 978-0747568254
  • ePub: 1788 kb | FB2: 1136 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (May 16, 2005)
  • Pages: 304
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 525
  • Format: txt mbr lrf azw
A Bigamist's Daughter ePub download

Praise for A Bigamist’s Daughter ‘McDermott balances a poignant romanticism with sharp realism in her own crisp and careful .

Praise for A Bigamist’s Daughter ‘McDermott balances a poignant romanticism with sharp realism in her own crisp and careful writing style’ Ms ‘A Bigamist’s Daughter is rare among recent books. A Bigamist’s Daughter is rare among recent books about sharp-witted unattached women because it doesn’t succumb to the fancies that growth is everyone’s birthright, and true love is still the best of everything’ Village Voice. Riotously funny, poignant, shrewd and often acutely real. Elizabeth Connelly is a new kind of female character. As unique as she is representative, as tough as she is needy, this bigamist’s daughter confronts us with the eighties’ Julia Markus.

Alice McDermott is a great writer. She has proved that fact many times by the many novels she has written after A Bigamist's Daughter which was her initial work

Alice McDermott is a great writer. She has proved that fact many times by the many novels she has written after A Bigamist's Daughter which was her initial work. This book had several memorable passages telling us about the mythologies of love that we all might succumb to in one way or another. It also reveals a heartless con-artist with a romantic heart, if that makes any sense.

A Bigamist's Daughter. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

she mouths, and Elizabeth waves. It was not mere coincidence, Elizabeth, the man on the phone is saying, his Southern accent thick and slick. It was not mere coincidence, Elizabeth, the man on the phone is saying, his Southern accent thick and slick rived, saw the newspaper on our coffee table opened to your ad, I knew I should call. Well, we’re glad you did, she says, drawing daisies on her notepad. The typewriters outside are still. She can hear the front door opening and closing, people calling Good night.

A Bigamist's Daughter book.

A bigamist's daughter : a novel. by. McDermott, Alice.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. A bigamist's daughter : a novel. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Praise for A Bigamist's Daughter. Impressiv. fascinatingly prismatic story

Praise for A Bigamist's Daughter. fascinatingly prismatic story. One of our finest novelists at work today. There's no one like Alice McDermot. er touch is light as a feather, her perceptions purely accurate. Alice McDermott is the author of five previous novels, including Child of My Heart; Charming Billy, winner of the 1998 National Book Award; and At Weddings and Wakes, all published by FSG and Picador. She lives with her family outside Washington, . Epic Photography/Jamie Schoenberger.

Alice McDermott was born in Brooklyn, New York on June 27, 1953

Alice McDermott was born in Brooklyn, New York on June 27, 1953. from the State University of New York at Oswego in 1975 and an . from the University of New Hampshire in 1978. She has written several novels including A Bigamist's Daughter, At Weddings and Wakes, Child of My Heart, After This, and Someone. That Night was made into a film starring C. Thomas Howell and Juliette Lewis in 1992. She has won several awards including the National Book Award for fiction in 1998 for Charming Billy, a Whiting Writers Award, and the 2008 Corrington Award for Literature. Библиографические данные.

Alice McDermott (born June 27, 1953) is an American writer and university professor. For her 1998 novel Charming Billy she won an American Book Award and the . National Book Award for Fiction. McDermott is Johns Hopkins University's Richard A. Macksey Professor of the Humanities. McDermott was born in Brooklyn, New York

Elizabeth Connelly sits in a New York office that looks like a real editor's, but isn't quite. Employed at a vanity press, Elizabeth watches the real world - of real struggles, passion, pain and love - spin around her. Until one day, a young writer comes to her with a novel about a man who loves more than one woman at once. And suddenly Elizabeth will be awakened from her young urban professional slumber - by a man's real touch and by a real story in search of an ending. This is a luminous novel of memory, revelation and desire.
Qumen
After reading several of Alice McDermott's other books this book was so disappointing. From the very beginning three book was very confusing. I had no idea whose perspective she was writing about or who was even telling the story. I just never really got into the story and skimmed through the entire book which seemed boring and irrelevant to me.
Felolv
Generally Alice's writing makes me think and follow closely so as not to miss her little back-and-forths with her characters. I enjoy her writing style and story lines very much.

However, and a big however it is, this book had such a disappointing ending that I can't even recommend it in good conscience. More precisely, it had NOOO ending at all. The story started out with some direction but quickly lost it. The farther I read the more I wondered whose secrets we were going to uncover. In the end we uncovered nothing. She left us hanging here folks.

Tupper was horrible. His personality was as bland as his complexion. And arrogant??? What's the guy so proud of? Elizabeth could've been okay if she'd snapped out of her coma and decided to have any kind of life. Some points made in the book were interesting although incredibly glorifying to a batch of people who selfishly "commit" themselves to more than one partner. If you want more than one "wife" don't get married!! No offense intended but how can anyone ever call bigamy a moral alternative to cheating? Or at the least when all parties involved aren't privy to the set up? Doesn't that make it the same thing??

But hence I divert. The short version...good author, bad book. Skip this one and read something else she wrote if you want to give Alice a try.
Bloodhammer
Alice McDermott is a great writer. She has proved that fact many times by the many novels she has written after A Bigamist's Daughter which was her initial work. This book had several memorable passages telling us about the mythologies of love that we all might succumb to in one way or another. It also reveals a heartless con-artist with a romantic heart, if that makes any sense. Compared to her other works, however, this one for me turned out to be somewhat of a dud. Chalk it up to a beginner's bad luck. It was a so-so beginning for a great artist.
Bluddefender
Perhaps not her best book but a different take on a family's hidden secrets and a daughter"s need to know.
Najinn
This item was in great condition when I received it. It was a gift for my Mom as she loved this book as she did all of Alice McDermott's books.
Boraston
Not my favorite Alice McD.
Cointrius
I had fairly high hopes for this book, although I suppose if I had looked at the reviews I would have known better. The writing in the book was very readable, that being said nothing else about this book fit.

The main character was mostly fine, but the relationships between all of the characters was unbelievable. New people appeared and disappeared quickly with little definition. Romantic relationships were highly unbelievable, and the reason for the initial attraction left a great deal to be desired. Everything seemed too easy and superficial, including the supposedly deep-seated feelings of the protagonist.

Possibly most upsetting was the plot. It really felt as though McDermott had an idea for a book and was so happy with it that she did not bother to developed it any further. It was like a rough outline with no real climax. All of the plot twists were absent from the book. I kept thinking I knew what the twists were going to be, but they never happened. I suppose you could say that at least it wasn't predictable. I literally read to the last page waiting for the revelation, it never arrived. Unless the shallow emotional clarity that the protagonist was supposed to have experienced was intended to be satisfying. If so it fell far from its mark. My mother always says life is too short to read bad books. I wish I had listened in the case of this book.
In a novel that dissects, deconstructs and recreates the fabric of life, love and literature, the author spotlights the world of publishing; the mythology of love, the elusiveness of the love object - all as the centerpiece of this work - formulate the basis for this story.

We begin with Elizabeth Connelly, a single woman living in New York - some time in the twentieth century, before computers or the current Internet generation - and discover her real life as an "editor-in-chief" at what is known in that day as a "vanity press." She meets her potential authors, praises their work - even when it is less than stellar - and signs them to contracts. They pay their fee and dream their dreams.

But one day she meets an author - Tupper Daniels, a southern gentleman - and in helping him "create an ending" for his unfinished manuscript, she stumbles down a path of exploration that leads her into the surreal world of elusive fathers - traveling fathers like her own - who are leading secret lives. Questioning all the stories told her by her mother, and examining her own tendency to tell tales - even create myths - about her own past loves, she begins to understand that fantasies, illusions and love myths have a life of their own, flourishing because of the necessity to preserve those very myths.

Fascinating portrayal of love, literature, and the elusive nature of dreams, A Bigamist's Daughter is a memorable novel that earns five stars.

Laurel-Rain Snow
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