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Daddy's Girl ePub download

by Charlotte Vale Allen

  • Author: Charlotte Vale Allen
  • ISBN: 0425088413
  • ISBN13: 978-0425088418
  • ePub: 1706 kb | FB2: 1553 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Publisher: Berkley (August 15, 1985)
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 733
  • Format: doc txt txt lrf
Daddy's Girl ePub download

DADDY'S GIRL is Charlotte Vale Allen's story - it is her autobiography. What makes this book important, is that it is NOT just any story. It is a story of incest and of one person's brave ordeal in telling it to the public.

DADDY'S GIRL is Charlotte Vale Allen's story - it is her autobiography. Ms Allen grew up in a family that seemed to thrive on lies. And the biggest lies that surrounded the family were the problems they had with Daddy. He was abusive to all of them: he constantly yelled at her mother; he tried often to physically hurt her.

Charlotte Vale Allen--an author I’d not read before, but will seek out more of her books--paints a story of the horrors that domestic violence creates, not only in the lives of those going through it, but those around them. Her characters are complex, the story moves along, told in different characters’ points of view, and the conclusion is satisfying. Highly recomm I bought this book ages ago, either at a library sale or a used bookstore. Finally decided to read it and could hardly put it down.

Charlotte Vale-Allen was born on January 19, 1941 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and lived in. .

Charlotte Vale-Allen was born on January 19, 1941 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and lived in England from 1961 to 1964 where she worked as a television actress and singer. She returned to Toronto briefly, performing as a singer and in cabaret revues until she emigrated to the United States in 1966. She married Walter Bateman Allen J. n 1970. They made their home in Connecticut and she began to write.

Charlotte Vale-Allen was born in Toronto and lived in England from 1961 to 1964 where she worked as a.

Charlotte Vale-Allen was born in Toronto and lived in England from 1961 to 1964 where she worked as a television actress and singer. Shortly after her marriage to Walter Allen in 1970 she began writing and sold her first novel Love Life in 1974.

Charlotte Vale-Allen On Writing. Often, with my novels, I am not at all happy when I reread them. I think that as an author I have little, if any, objectivity about my work once it's completed and so am not necessarily a good judge of it. But I am proud of DADDY'S GIRL. Since its publication in 1980 it has been of help to a lot of people.

Charlotte Vale-Allen is a writer of contemporary fiction  . It was eventually published in 1980.

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Allen got married, had a little girl, was amicably divorced; but none of this is shown, simply told. The manuscript, we're informed, was incubating for nine years until Allen's agent felt she was ""ready"" to tackle it; possibly it should have waited somewhat longer. From the time she was seven until the age of 17, Canadian Charlotte Vale Allen spent two evenings a week-mom's card-playing nights-placating her easily enraged father by performing sexual favors for him. For this she received money, though she stresses that her main objective was to mollify him and preserve the family peace.

Emancipated long before anybody had heard of it, she escaped her family to save [her] life. The life that is recounted in Daddy's Girl is harrowing, yet the memoir is distinguished by Allen's heroic efforts to rescue and support herself, by herself. This memoir emphasizes - in addition to a commitment not to live life as a "walking wound" - the power of language.Allen has always believed in the potency of words; she began writing as a child, and used notes to communicate with women she admired. She began writing fiction in order to get Daddy's Girl published, which supports the idea (central to confessional writers), that the self may be transformed by the self-in-writing.
Juce
This is the revealing account of the author's painful childhood--one filled with raw feelings, confusion, family dysfunction, and a desperately guarded secret that continually flooded her during the formative years. Early in her adult life she tried for nine years to both divulge and bury the secret inside a novel. This just did not work, until she realized that her story could not be told in voice of an all-knowing third person. Instead it required that she unwrap her secret as her personal (first person) experience. Nevertheless, during those years of authorial struggle, she published other well received novels. Structurally, Ms. Allen interweaves her story repeatedly with flash forwards and flashbacks. Through these she gradually advances her narrative. She describes helpful relationships with several persons, outside her family of origin, that contributed to the person she was becoming. In the end she emerged from her seemingly interminable ordeal; faced down her demons; achieved a notable career as a much published novelist; and pursued her own journey toward identity, intimacy and generativity. Her relationship with teacher, Helen McKay, fills her with wonder; establishes for her an ego ideal; encourages her self expression; and ultimately reworks itself subconsciously until it emerges in the form of an repeatedly invariant, sublimating dream that is directing her toward greater wholeness and an identity of her own. Helen is a guiding star. Certainly the life experiences that she relates in Daddy's Girl will afford readers of her other novels with insights into the wellsprings of struggle and quest from which she draws when writing.
Steamy Ibis
I've read most of Charlotte Vale Allen's books, but I'd missed this one, so I finally decided to download it to my Kindle. It's a very honest portrayal of her horrific childhood. She was sexually abused by her father for about ten years. I think anyone who has experienced sexual abuse would benefit from reading this memoir. She doesn't sugarcoat the experience. She honestly shares that the experience has haunted her throughout her life and has caused confusion and pain in later relationships with men. But, she did free herself from her father and managed to come to terms with the experience over many years. There's something about Ms. Allen's writing that appeals to me--I think it's her directness and honesty, along with the ability to tell a good tale. Sadly, this one was based on real-life experience.
Love Me
DADDY'S GIRL is Charlotte Vale Allen's story - it is her autobiography. What makes this book important, is that it is NOT just any story. It is a story of incest and of one person's brave ordeal in telling it to the public.
Ms Allen grew up in a family that seemed to thrive on lies. And the biggest lies that surrounded the family were the problems they had with Daddy. He was abusive to all of them: he constantly yelled at her mother; he tried often to physically hurt her. Her brothers were treated a little better, but they too were filled with anger and fear for their father. Charlotte, however, developed a "special" bond, that continued for many years. Because of this abuse, Charlotte grew up with a number of neuroses and fears that followed her into adulthood.
The book takes place in the present, with flashbacks starting from her earliest memories. What I liked about the way the story was written, was that it helped us see how her past affected her present life. She took the time to compare herself and her daughter, and the relationship they had, to what she had with her own mother, many years ago. Her relationship with her father destroyed her ability to trust any man, and she shows the reader how she slowly over came this.
I found DADDY'S GIRL, despite its theme, an easy book to read. Ms Allen's style of writing enables the reader to see HER world through the eyes of herself as a child. I think this is important because it helps convey what she truly went through. What's most important is that she was able to tell the story from her point of view. If it had been written from a third person narrative, the book would have been a more impersonal telling, and would not have come across as poignant as it did. I highly recommend DADDY'S GIRL.
Daigami
Of all the books written on the subject of child abuse, this book (one of the very first published) stands alone as a singular accomplishment. It is honest and insightful, yet never overly graphic. The author brings her considerable writing talent to bear on her reflection of how years of abuse shaped her as an adult and a parent. Never bitter, never placing blame, Charlotte Vale Allen offers a potent look at the insidious permanent effects of her childhood experience. It is a gracious, heartfelt autobiography in which the author not only never names her parents but, in many ways, offers an understanding of the family dynamics at play that is nothing less than remarkable. To read her fiction and then to read this book is to see a very full portrait of a woman with the heart of a lion and a powerful gift of insight into the behavior, not only of others but also of her own self--past and present. It is the definitive book to read in order to comprehend how an extraordinary child coped with an ongoing horror and yet emerged to take what she'd learned and turn it to the good by writing books that always offer viable explanations for what is, so often, inaccessible to most of us. In its own right, Daddy's Girl is a quiet masterpiece.
Perilanim
This book is a classic. It's as meaningful to incest victims today as when it was written. But to people like myself who haven't experienced this horrible treatment from a parent, it helps us understand how a child feels, why it is hard to tell anyone, and how their life is forever changed. It took courage to write so honestly and to re-visit the painful past but the author has done a remarkable job of sharing her story which as the paperback cover of her book says - "is not unique...and must be told." I could not put the book down. I wanted to rescue that little child from her brutal father and just love her. Anyone who reads her book will feel much the same I think.
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