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A Change In Altitude ePub download

by Anita Shreve

  • Author: Anita Shreve
  • ISBN: 1444803549
  • ISBN13: 978-1444803549
  • ePub: 1630 kb | FB2: 1594 kb
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Publisher: Charnwood; Large type / large print edition edition (September 1, 2010)
  • Pages: 360
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 156
  • Format: lrf azw doc mbr
A Change In Altitude ePub download

Except as permitted under the .

Except as permitted under the . Little, Brown and Company. 237 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10017.

A Change in Altitude book.

However, after reading A Change in Altitude, this latest work is definitely the best yet. I love how Shreve describes the characters and the setting in such graphic detail

However, after reading A Change in Altitude, this latest work is definitely the best yet. I love how Shreve describes the characters and the setting in such graphic detail. The way she describes the disparities between the richer and poorer parts of Nairobi, as well as the beauty of Kenya and the treachery of Mount Kenya makes the reader feel as if they are "along for the ride" throughout the entire novel.

Not this Saturday, but the next. Patrick made the announcement as he moved into the guest room of the Big House, the plumbing in their own small cottage currently disabled. Patrick spoke of the. climb without fanfare, as he might a party in two weeks’ time. They were young, each twenty-eight. They’d been in the country three months. Despite the heat, Patrick’s shirt still held its creases. James, whose black skin shone blue in the planes of his face, washed their clothes in a bathtub, hung them to dry, and pressed them with an iron that made the fabric hiss

A Change in Altitude illuminates the inner landscape of a couple, the irrevocable impact of tragedy, and the elusive nature of forgiveness. Скачать (epub, 422 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF.

A change in altitude. By Anita Shreve (Little, Brown £1. 9). Evoking the landscape of Africa with an infectious passion that could have you booking yourself on the next flight to Nairobi, Shreve's 15th novel equally effectively maps the unknown corners of the human heart

A change in altitude. By John Harding for MailOnline Updated: 08:56 EST, 10 November 2009. Evoking the landscape of Africa with an infectious passion that could have you booking yourself on the next flight to Nairobi, Shreve's 15th novel equally effectively maps the unknown corners of the human heart.

A Change in Altitude I awaited your latest book and was sorely disappointed. Anita Shreve grew up in Dedham, Massachusetts

A Change in Altitude I awaited your latest book and was sorely disappointed. Did not like Margaret at all. No character, no discipline; nothing. Anita Shreve grew up in Dedham, Massachusetts. Her approimately 20 novels include The Pilot's Wife, The Weight of Water, Eden Close, Strange Fits of Passion, Where or When, and Resistance. Anita Shreve began writing fiction while working as a high school teacher after graduating from Tufts University. Although one of her first published stories, "Past the Island, Drifting," was awarded an O. Henry Prize in 1975, Shreve felt she couldn't make a living as a fiction writer so she became a journalist.

A Change of Altitude is about a couple who are temporarily living in Africa and decide to spice up their life by climbing a very challenging local mountain.

I do enjoy her books that take place in Africa because she has such a lovely command of the description of nature there. A Change of Altitude is about a couple who are temporarily living in Africa and decide to spice up their life by climbing a very challenging local mountain. They decided to pair up with some acquaintances of the husband; however the wife in that pair is a somewhat cocky and combative woman. She is easily exasperated by the main female character whom she considers to be weak and passive.

a b c d "Anita Shreve Memorial Book Collection". Dedham High School Alumni Association News (Spring 2019): 5. ^ "Richard H. Shreve (1922–2005)".

In the real story, they were near the top of the mountain, and Mary slipped on the ice, but the guide caught her before she fell off the edge. In Shreve's version, Mary fell off the edge and died. Shreve was a cheerful person, but her stories were often tragic. a b c d "Anita Shreve Memorial Book Collection".

lifestyle
I was very disappointed in this book. The book starts as if you are in the middle of a conversation between the newlyweds, Margaret and Patrick. It felt as if I had turned on a movie I had never seen before right in the middle and was trying to make sense of it. It was apparent this newlywed couple had obvious issues based on how distant they were to each other in their conversation.
The author did create complex characters, but none you really like. The imagery was the best part of the book when Anita Shreve was writing about Africa, I could truly envision the country in my mind as if I was right there, however, I was highly disappointed in the characters and the way she wrote the book. The planned trek up the mountain involved Margaret and Patrick, the older couple, Diana and Arthur, and a third couple, Saartje and Willem.
The group dynamic was tense and the reader did not really know why until near the end of the trek when an accident happened. The accident caused an even deeper rift between Margaret and Patrick after the returned home and changed the way their life would play out. Pretty good sounding story, eh, Dear Bloggite? It had its opportunity to be a great book but I feel the author missed her mark.
There was an apparent error in the story line about how Margaret and Patrick met and I do not know if that was on the editors of the book, the author who had an intended reason behind it and forgot about it, or just plain lack of review when writing, but it bothered me. I do not like things to go amiss in a story unless there is something down the line in the story that validates the reasons for it.
I do give the author props on her ability with imagery but that was the only thing I found likable, heck, the story ended just about as bad as it began, with no closure and the author leading us to the final assumption that she wanted.
Unnis
I enjoyed this book for the descriptions of African scenery and life.
I was very disappointed with the characters. The only character we got to know was Margaret. It's not clear to me how she and Patrick managed to get married because there doesn't seem to be much love between them. He seems irritable with her all the time and I just wished she would stand up for herself a bit more. We didn't discover anything more about Patrick's character.
I did find it very that people that had never gone climbing before would take on such a challenging climb with a couple they didn't know very well and with only three weeks preparation. The so called 'indiscretion' that seems to be the main focus of this book was in my opinion extremely innocent and hardly surprising it happened at all given the weakness of the relationship between Patrick and Margaret.
Following the accident, the other couple that I thought would be central to the book, completely disappeared.
We then moved on to the second half of the book and Margaret's new job. Here she met another man and a relationship seemed to be blossoming when once again our character disappeared.
If Sherve had developed her characters a bit more this could have been a very enjoyable read. We just never got to know the characters well enough to care about them. The question about what to do when the relationship hit a crises, stay or leave, became irrelevant to me because I didn't know the characters well enough to care. It's a shame that the author was so busy sharing her experiences of Africa with us that she forgot about the story she was writing.

O. Murray
Valawye
I love Shreve's writing but wow. . . I could not believe that Margaret--a strong, intelligent, independent woman--stayed with the condescending, sexist and completely unsupportive cad of a husband. She chose playing tennis and climbing up a mountain over true love with Rafiq? It didn't make sense. It didn't ring true. The character that Shreve created in Margaret would have LEFT such a husband and followed Rafiq to London.
Manemanu
Of the approximately 28 Anita Shreve-authored books, this is the only one I haven't yet read. Unfortunately, since she just passed, there will not be any others. I've liked all the others (Rescue not so much), so I imagine this one will be no different. She was a great writer. I highly recommend all her novels--but maybe not Rescue!
Keth
As a rock climber, that climbed Mt Kenya in 1962 to Battian's summit, and a sailor since 1972, this novel crosses every rule ever created for safe climbing. I was so appalled at the complete lack of safety and obedience to one's leader, that after only 50 pages or so I could NOT read any more and gave the book away.
Her accounts of Man 0ver Board events and similar, while taking some literary licence, are acceptable to an expert in sailing and MOB drills. However, as also being an expert in Rock and Ice safety, this book has no place but File 13, the TRASH BIN
I have loved every other novel she has written, and am buying some more now

As an aside, anyone considering an affair should read "Where or When" , a delightful, thought provoking, scary novel about just how badly affairs can end......... This is Anita at her best!!!!

I wrote directly to Anita about A Change In Altitude some months ago, but she never replied
Jark
I have been reading Anita Shreve for many years now, and The Pilot's Wife has always been my favorite novel of hers. However, after reading A Change in Altitude, this latest work is definitely the best yet. I love how Shreve describes the characters and the setting in such graphic detail. The way she describes the disparities between the richer and poorer parts of Nairobi, as well as the beauty of Kenya and the treachery of Mount Kenya makes the reader feel as if they are "along for the ride" throughout the entire novel. I also loved the references to Karen Blixen and "Out of Africa," which to this day remains one of my favorite films. I could not put this book down, and I highly recommend it!
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