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McTeague: A Story of San Francisco (The World's Classics) ePub download

by Frank Norris

  • Author: Frank Norris
  • ISBN: 0192823566
  • ISBN13: 978-0192823564
  • ePub: 1611 kb | FB2: 1499 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Classics
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (January 11, 1996)
  • Pages: 388
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 203
  • Format: lrf doc rtf txt
McTeague: A Story of San Francisco (The World's Classics) ePub download

Set in San Francisco at the turn of the twentieth century, its horror and brutality are still shocking in today's world.

Set in San Francisco at the turn of the twentieth century, its horror and brutality are still shocking in today's world. The story begins with a portrait of McTeague, a large, somewhat bumbling dumb giant of a man who works as a dentist and finds no greater pleasure than drinking steam beer and playing on his concertina. His only aspiration for success is to one day hang a gilded tooth outside of his window as a sign of his profession.

McTeague: A Story of San Francisco, The Octopus: A Story of California. San Francisco: The Book Club of California. A tavern on San Francisco's Polk Street, near Frank Norris Place, is named McTeague's Saloon in honor of Norris's novel McTeague (1899). The interior and exterior are decorated with objects and imagery associated with the novel  . The Apprenticeship Writings of Frank Norris 1896–1898. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society.

Then one day at San Francisco had come the news of his mother’s death; she had left him some money-not much . On the top shelf McTeague kept his concertina and a bag of bird seed for the canary. The whole place exhaled a mingled odor of bedding, creosote, and ether

Then one day at San Francisco had come the news of his mother’s death; she had left him some money-not much, but enough to set him up in business; so he had cut loose from the charlatan and had opened his Dental Parlors on Polk Street, an accommodation street of small shops in the residence quarter of the town. The whole place exhaled a mingled odor of bedding, creosote, and ether. But for one thing, McTeague would have been perfectly contented.

McTeague by Frank Norris tells the story of a couple's courtship and marriage, and their subsequent descent into poverty, violence and finally murder as the result of jealousy and avarice

McTeague by Frank Norris tells the story of a couple's courtship and marriage, and their subsequent descent into poverty, violence and finally murder as the result of jealousy and avarice. McTeague is a graphic depiction of urban American life centering around McTeague, a dentist practicing in San Francisco. At first content with his life and friendship with an ambitious man named Marcus,avarice.

Frank Norris (1870–1902) was born in Chicago, Illinois. His death in 1902 left the third book unfinished. A young student at the Académie Julian in Paris, Norris was exposed to naturalism in literature and became particularly fascinated in the study of human evolution. After years of working as a correspondent for various newspapers, Norris began his unfinished trilogy, the Epic of Wheat. The two completed titles-The Octopus and The Pit-revealed the suffering caused by corrupt and greedy turn-of-the-century corporate monopolies. His death in 1902 left the third book unfinished

They were in the world, they were elegant, they were debonair, they had their young men.  . After coming from Miss Baker’s room Maria knocked at McTeague’s door.

They were in the world, they were elegant, they were debonair, they had their young men. On this occasion she presented herself at the door of Old Grannis’s room late in the afternoon. His door stood a little open. The dentist was lying on the bed-lounge in his stocking feet, doing nothing apparently, gazing up at the ceiling, lost in thought. Since he had spoken to Trina Sieppe, asking her so abruptly to marry him, McTeague had passed a week of torment. For him there was no going back. It was Trina now, and none other.

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McTeague (1899) chronicles the demise of a San Francisco couple at the end of the nineteenth century. Country of Publication. Inspired by an actual crime that was sensationalized in the San Francisco papers, it tells the story of charlatan dentist McTeague, his wife Trina, and their spiralling descent into moral corruption. Norris is often considered to be the 'American Zola', and this is one of the most purely naturalistic American novels of the nineteenth century.

A Deal in Wheat and Other Stories of the New and Old West.

The Octopus: A Story of California. McTeague, A Story of San Francisco. From the author of McTeague: The classic novel of corporate corruption and violent rebellion in the railroad industry. On May 11, 1880, at a San Joaquin Valley ranch, a shootout between tenant farmers and a sheriff’s posse left seven dead. The dispute was over land rights. The law was acting in the service of the Southern Pacific Railroad. McTeague: A Story of San Francisco.

Inspired by an actual crime that was sensationalized in the San Francisco papers, this novel tells the story of charlatan dentist McTeague and his wife Trina, and their spiralling descent into moral corruption. Norris is often considered to be the "American Zola," and this passionate tale of greed, degeneration, and death is one of the most purely naturalistic American novels of the nineteenth century. It is also one of the first major works of literature set in California, and it provided the story for Erich von Stroheim's classic of the silent screen, Greed.
OTANO
I discovered this book through a recommendation from Amazon when I was ordering several turn-of-the 20th century novels. Written in 1899, by a young author who died in 1902 at the age of 32, the setting is San Francisco, the characters are flawed, and the story is filled with strong brutish images of greed.

The main character, McTeague (who is never given a first name throughout the book) was brought up in the mining camps, and apprenticed himself to a traveling dentist at a young age. When the story opens he is a dentist, living in a small apartment house and earning a living through this trade. When the innocent Trina needs some dental work, he falls in love with her and wins her away from his best friend Marcus whose seethes with anger and wants revenge.

McTeague and Trina plan to marry and at first are delighted when Trina wins $5,000 in a lottery. But as the story unfolds, the couple's happiness becomes tainted as Trina hoards her money. Other characters are introduced to support the theme of greed. There's the Mexican maid who sells whenever she can steal to the Jewish man who lusts for gold. There is the elderly man and elderly woman who are too shy to admit their attraction for each other. And then there are the dogs which always seem to be in the background and support the animalistic nature of the evolving plot.

There is success followed by utter failure and the rapidly changing relationship between McTeague and Trina into that of sadism and masochism. At times the book is hard to read. But it's also hard to put down. At the beginning I was a bit frustrated by the author's long descriptions of scenery and furnishings and let my eyes slide past them to look for the action by the characters. But the story is about things owned and things lost. And so there was a reason and an importance to all those long descriptions.

The conclusion is raw, brutal and inevitable. It was also perfect.

I consider this book a little-known hidden gem. I'm glad I discovered it and found out that novels written during this time period are not all about manners and the sheltered world of the elite.
Mildorah
"McTeague" by Frank Norris, an author who had a prolific career considering his short life, is highly regarded as a work of realism. And on that premise, it delivers, with characters full of flaws and a story that examines the darkest sides of human nature. Set in San Francisco at the turn of the twentieth century, its horror and brutality are still shocking in today's world.

The story begins with a portrait of McTeague, a large, somewhat bumbling dumb giant of a man who works as a dentist and finds no greater pleasure than drinking steam beer and playing on his concertina. His only aspiration for success is to one day hang a gilded tooth outside of his window as a sign of his profession. But his bachelor ways are changed when Trina Sieppe enters his life, the cousin of his one and only friend, and McTeague suddenly finds himself in love. Through sheer force rather than any ordinary type of courtship, McTeague persuades Trina to marry him, and she is lucky enough to win five thousand dollars in the lottery. They begin a life of success after success, but Trina refuses to touch the money she has won, becoming greedier as their marriage goes on, which begins to cause problems, especially when their luck takes a turn for the worse. McTeague deserts Trina, intent on seeking revenge for her loving money over him, and the ending of the novel is dark, tragic, yet fitting for what Norris has crafted.

There are various subplots in "McTeague" all of which seem to revolve around the negative impact that the desire for wealth can have on people. It is a dark tale, as one could guess with a subtitle like "The Brute" - full of unscrupulous characters who will stop at nothing to get what they want. Norris' writing is somewhat stilted at times, he is often repetitive, and the Swedish accents of Trina's family are a chore to read through. However, Norris embellished his story with a wide array of symbolism that ties the main plot and subplots together, making the bleak ending a fitting coda to the story that he has painted of real life.
Gavigamand
I purchased this book because my daughter was reading it in college. I was not familiar with either the title or the author, but a quick web search allowed me to rectify that shortcoming quickly. It is a gut wrenching view into the early city life of San Francisco. Marriage, money, and ignorance are the main charaters presented through names that soon become the face of the story.

Norris, the realist, doesn't waste time on the way the world could be, and he doesn't even speculate on the way things are; he rather cuts to the reality of the time and, like a snapshot, gives us that which an observant eye would see if present. The violent ignorance manifested by the characters stuns, and I was amazed and intrigued by the actions of individuals I had become close to through the events of the story.

Be forewarned, those sensitive to sterotypical descriptions of race will be shocked, and those without patience for the actions of brutally ignorant settlers will be sickened. Nevertheless, for a picture of the probable behavior of the settlers of the west, this is a fine read.
Arashilkis
There was good character development. But the last few chapters were just gruesome. And it began with a nice love story. I did like the spelling of the words when the German people were speaking English.
Peras
I absolutely loved this book. From the description of early San Francisco to the heat of Death Valley, this was a real page turner. All through the book you are rooting for McTeague, and you want him to do the right thing. I guess that's all I can say without giving too much away. But this is the definition of a good fiction book--one that makes you believe the characters are real, and gets you invested in their lives. Highly recommend!
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