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A Game of Hide and Seek ePub download

by Elizabeth Jane Howard,Elizabeth Taylor

  • Author: Elizabeth Jane Howard,Elizabeth Taylor
  • ISBN: 1844085295
  • ISBN13: 978-1844085293
  • ePub: 1981 kb | FB2: 1634 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Classics
  • Publisher: Virago Press Ltd (May 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 954
  • Format: lrf lit txt mobi
A Game of Hide and Seek ePub download

Elizabeth Taylor wrote 12 novels, and each displays her exquisitely light touch, her firt for discreet irony and her skill at revealing the emotional . Elizabeth Taylor (not the film star).

Elizabeth Taylor wrote 12 novels, and each displays her exquisitely light touch, her firt for discreet irony and her skill at revealing the emotional depths behind even the meekest exterior. She is at her very best here, a novel in which love is never declared, but is meticulously evoked. No writer has described the English middle classes with more gently devastating accuracy - Rebecca Abrams, SPECTATOR.

by Elizabeth Taylor (Author), Elizabeth Jane Howard (Introduction).

The novel is set in England between WWI and WWII and focused on the characters of Harriet Claridge and Vesey Macmillan. The novel explores their relationship, its effect on those around them, as they seek each other's love for more than 25 years.

Elizabeth Taylor (author), Elizabeth Jane Howard (author of introduction). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. When he goes to Oxford she cherishes his photograph and waits for a letter that never comes. Years pass and Harriet stifles her dreams; with a husband and daughter, she excels at respectability. But then Vesey reappears and her marriage seems to melt away.

Elizabeth Taylor (1912-1975) is increasingly recognised as one of the best British writers of the twentieth century

When he goes to Oxford she cherishes his photograph and waits for a letter that never comes. Elizabeth Taylor (1912-1975) is increasingly recognised as one of the best British writers of the twentieth century. She wrote her first book, At Mrs Lippincote's, during the war while her husband was in the Royal Air Force, and this was followed by eleven further novels and a children's book, Mossy Trotter.

By (author) Elizabeth Taylor, Introduction by Elizabeth Jane Howard

By (author) Elizabeth Taylor, Introduction by Elizabeth Jane Howard. Her acclaimed short stories appeared in publications including Vogue, the New Yorker and Harper's Bazaar.

This is a wonderful novel

This is a wonderful novel. What more is there to say?.

Elizabeth Taylor's tale of unfulfilled middle-class lives is exquisitely rendered, says Elizabeth Da. The comparison is particularly unfair because Taylor's forte as an author is acute observation and the devastating precision of her understated prose

Elizabeth Taylor's tale of unfulfilled middle-class lives is exquisitely rendered, says Elizabeth Da. The comparison is particularly unfair because Taylor's forte as an author is acute observation and the devastating precision of her understated prose. Her brilliance is particularly evident in this, her fifth novel, set in her familiar milieu of middle-class married couples whose unfulfilled lives are crisscrossed with unspoken tension and stifled ardour. The plot is simple but exquisitely rendered: Harriet, married to the dull but benign Charles, is thrown into confusion by the reappearance of her first love, Vesey, after 15 years of absence.

Elizabeth Taylor is finally being recognised as an important British author: an. .Elizabeth Jane Howard. Place of Publication.

Elizabeth Taylor is finally being recognised as an important British author: an author of great subtlety, great compassion and great depth. Years pass, and Harriet stifles her imaginings; with a husband and daughter, she excels at respectability. When he goes to Oxford she cherishes his photograph and waits for the letter that never comes.

This is a wonderful novel. What more is there to say?

This is a wonderful novel.

With a cover design by Celia BirtwellDuring summer games of hide-and-seek Harriet falls in love with Vesey and his elusive, teasing ways. When he goes to Oxford she cherishes his photograph and waits for the letter that never comes. Then Charles enters her life, and Harriet stifles her imaginings. With a husband and daughter, she excels at respectability: ornaments on the mantlepiece, remembered birthdays and jars of lilac. But when Vesey reappears, her marriage seems to melt away. Harriet is older, it is much too late, but she is still in love with him.First published in 1958, this is Elizabeth Taylor's subtlest and finest work.
Cordann
I am a fast reader, so one test I have of a book is whether it slows me down with pleasure (and often awe). From the opening, it became clear that Elizabeth Taylor is a superb writer of sentences, keenly aware of the sounds of words as well as their various meanings. Her sentences bear - and sometimes require - re-reading; plot and character points can sometimes be found in subordinate clauses. They also require close reading because every word counts and every word is necessary. (This distinguishes her from Elizabeth Bowen, in my opinion.)

Her sentences are in aid of a wonderful, complicated story which weaves its trajectory through marvelous set pieces and aching missed opportunities. It is a love story and is told sometimes from within the heads of her two lovers and sometimes from an authorial distance. Like life, some episodes are ambiguous - none moreso than the ending. Because the story is about ordinary people, with ordinary feelings and dilemmas, it comes as a shock to the attentive reader to realize that this is a huge book, large in its compassion, understanding and clarity. Life is this way, but it is rarely told or experienced so beautifully.
6snake6
I enjoy Anita Brookner's works, and thought I had stumbled upon an author of the same quality and depth. I was mistaken; she is better than Brookner. She reminds me to some extent of Muriel Spark, although she does not have her snippiness or sarcasm. I like all three writers: each has her own perspective and articulates that perspective so wonderfully. Read them all! But read Taylor first; she understands the complexity of human society in a way the other two do not: they are more focused on the individual; Taylor sees that individual in the context of his social, sexual and political natures.
anonymous
Really well written with very detailed perception of social and physical detail of post war life. Fascinating, moving and clever with a surprise ending.
Black_Hawk_Down
I think it would have some interest for younger women readers because the novel documents the plight of women (so few options) so well in this period (late 50's early 60's). There is a exceptionally sad love story if you like that kind of thing. I'm a big fan of ET and have read most of her work.
Peles
Bought for a Birthday Gift and the recipient was delighted!
Saberblade
Insightful story of a young man and woman who never quite come together, in spite of much interest in each other.
Flarik
A Game of Hide and Seek, published in 1951 and recently republished as a New York Review Book Classic, is one of author Elizabeth Taylor’s most intensely psychological novels, the story of two young people – Harriet and Vesey - who spend their time in self-imposed isolation, their paths crossing briefly when, as teenagers they find themselves sharing summer vacations. Though they sometimes use hide-and-seek games so they can be together while they wait for the younger children in the family to find them, they are, shy, innocent, and self-conscious. They end up “hiding” in the loft or the barn “among old pots of paint, boxes of bulbs, stacks of cobwebbed deck-chairs, rather far apart and in silence…The only interruption was when one of them timidly swallowed an accumulation of saliva.”

From this inauspicious beginning of the novel, which is further complicated for the reader because the first thirty pages of the novel “tell about” the past with little dialogue to enliven it, the author develops the relationship between Harriet and Vesey over the next thirty years. As a teenager enamored of Vesey but unsure of herself and of him, she obsesses over a quick kiss he gives her as he prepares to go on to school and invents stories of meeting him secretly, as she writes in her diary in excruciating detail about every action or movement he makes. Vesey, too, is also isolated, but his reaction when he is in school is the opposite of Harriet’s. Instead of being timid, he becomes “disruptive, cheeky…and the same sort of little monkey that he had been at home.” His disappearance part way through the summer on their last year together is devastating to Harriet.

The novel divides into two parts. Eventually, Harriet meets “an elderly man of thirty-five,” a solicitor who plays concert piano for Harriet and her mother when they visit. In a surprise to no one, Harriet and Charles eventually connect, though her feelings for Charles are closer to toleration than love. Harriet’s personality changes after her marriage, and she becomes somewhat more assertive, more willing to take chances. Occasionally, over the years, she and Vesey meet secretly, something that gives Harriet something to look forward to in her boring marriage, “a frayed and tangled thing made by two strangers.”

This novel, despite its slow start, becomes all-consuming as Taylor creates real people with real feelings from a society which is socially poles apart from our own. Still, she manages to make the reader understand Harriet as she changes, along with the shallow Vesey, the responsible but insecure Charles, the lonely and romantic Betsy desperate for love, and the parents and friends of all of them, providing a context for Harriet, Vesey, and Charles and explaining their thinking. Darkly humorous in some places, it is almost unbearably sad in other places as the reader observes the characters struggling to create some vestige of happiness which most of us experience spontaneously. What keeps them all going, apparently, is the idea that “Another day is another world…”
This is, quite simply, an astounding piece of writing, which may very well join that small handful of my favorite novels of all time. It's incredibly perceptive, perfectly expressed, and ineffably sad. Taylor's powers of observation are almost painfully acute and -- usually -- heartbreaking: at one point, she observes that a character had kept a locked journal in her youth though, upon reflection, she wondered whether the lock had been absolutely necessary. That quietly devastating little line (for no one, you see, had ever been tempted to investigate her innermost private thoughts) is a good example of Taylor's subtle and understated style, and the emotional depth her perceptions often reach. I will be reading a great deal more of Taylor's works from now on, I can tell you: based on this one book alone, she was one of the twentieth century's best.
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