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Only the Ball Was White ePub download

by Robert Peterson

  • Author: Robert Peterson
  • ISBN: 0136372155
  • ISBN13: 978-0136372158
  • ePub: 1833 kb | FB2: 1379 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Ancient & Medieval Literature
  • Publisher: Prentice-Hall; 1st edition (1970)
  • Pages: 406
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 863
  • Format: azw doc mobi lrf
Only the Ball Was White ePub download

Robert W. Peterson (1925 Warren, Pennsylvania –February 11, 2006) was an American newspaper writer who later became a freelance author of magazine articles and books, especially on the topics of sports and Scouting.

Robert W. His 1970 chronicle of Negro league baseball entitled Only the Ball Was White was hailed by The New York Times as having "recaptured a lost era in baseball history and a rich facet of black life in America". Peterson is the author of Cages to Jump Shots (Oxford, 1990) and The Boy Scouts: An American Adventure. He has written for Sports Illustrated, The New York Times Magazine, Sport, Boys' Life, and many other magazines. Paperback: 416 pages. Publisher: Oxford University Press (April 30, 1992).

A monumental and poignant book, Only the Ball Was White reminds us that what was often considered the "Golden Age" . A fascinating read from Robert Peterson that is thoroughly entertaining on the history of not only legendary black ballplayers but the many teams and the roads traveled.

A monumental and poignant book, Only the Ball Was White reminds us that what was often considered the "Golden Age" of baseball was also the era of Jim Crow. It is a book that must be read by anyone hoping not only to understand the story of baseball, but the story of America. These are men that loved baseball and the only barrier to the major leagues was the color of their skin.

Peterson, Robert, 1925-2006. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Baseball, African American baseball players, Negro leagues. Englewood Cliffs, . Uploaded by Lotu Tii on September 16, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

A monumental and poignant book, Only the Ball Was White reminds us that what was often considered the "Golden Age" of. .Robert Peterson originally published this book in 1970 so it's really the original and standard history of the Negro Leagues. Peterson not only tells the history of these leagues and some of the great.

Robert Peterson originally published this book in 1970 so it's really the original and standard history of the Negro Leagues. Peterson not only tells the history of these leagues and some of the great players, but also provides brief biographical sketches of dozens of players whose big league service would otherwise be lost to history. The book also has extensive appendices with annual standings and box scores of all-star games. The book gives us glimpses into Jim Crow America (and it was not just in the South)

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A monumental and poignant book, Only the Ball Was White reminds us that what was often considered the . Robert W.

A monumental and poignant book, Only the Ball Was White reminds us that what was often considered the Golden Age of baseball was also the era of Jim Crow. It is a book that must be read by anyone hoping t only to understand the story of baseball, but the story of America. Country of Publication.

The book certainly fills in a large void and there are about 100 pages of appendices covering leagues, games, players and officials through the 1950 season. A substantial recorded playback of Negro baseball from its post-Civil War inception until Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1946 with most of the action taking place in the first half of the 20th century, There are brief career resumes of most of the greatest players (with the author arguing for long overdue recognition of several of them in the.

1971, 3rd ptg Negro Baseball, Like New in Like New DJ
Tygrarad
Print was much too small. Hard to read and I have great vision. Publisher packed way too much into the pages. I returned it immediately.
Kelenn
There are dozens of books written on the Game. This one is essential to a full understanding of Baseball.
Of course, it has gaps. As it explains, there was seldom an official scorer, so we will never know exactly how many home runs Josh Gibson hit, or how many games Satchel Paige won. Nonetheless this is an outstanding compendium of research.
But is does tell us of some of the great and heretofore unknowns of the game. It tells how Rube Foster helped create an institution in which African Americans could take pride.
Want to know the only man to hit a fair ball out of Yankee Stadium? Check out the answer here in this book.
Tiainar
Baseball fans will enjoy it.
White gold
This book was not what I thought it would be. Its part stat book, part biography, part history of the leagues. It is not as story-like as I expected and seems a bit fractured in places. Having said that, its a wonderful book that conveys a lot of the zeitgeist of the time. For a book with so many facts, it is surprisingly easy to read. Though, at times it seems to repeat itself, it still conjures up an age when African American players wore their caps sideways, introduced stealing bases on a regular basis etc... It is a shame that so many sad periods in world history become fascinating periods to read about for generations that follow after. Educational, entertaining and solidly researhed, bravo!
Geny
Robert Peterson originally published this book in 1970 so it's really the original and standard history of the Negro Leagues. Peterson not only tells the history of these leagues and some of the great players, but also provides brief biographical sketches of dozens of players whose big league service would otherwise be lost to history. The book also has extensive appendices with annual standings and box scores of all-star games. The book gives us glimpses into Jim Crow America (and it was not just in the South).

Peterson portrays the often overlooked fact that the Negro Leagues were a business venture run almost exclusively by and for black people. And it was a tough business at that, but one that drew often sizeable crowds, especially on exciting and exhausting barnstorming tours. The Negro Leagues could not survive integration as its best players were siphoned off to the 'majors'. Despite the obvious benefits to those men who were finally broke through the wall of prejudice, the reader also understands that there was a sense of loss when the leagues shut down in 1960. More powerfully, the reader experiences the lost opportunities suffered by those players who never got the chance to play in the majors and make major league money, like Jimmie Crutchfield, the Black Lloyd Waner, who barely made a living on one side of Pittsburgh playing for the Crawfords while Waner hauled down $12,000 a year (a princely sum at the time) playing for the Pirates.

A must read for anyone interested in baseball, race relations, or American history.
Cemav
This book beautifully captures the heart and soul of what the Negro League was. Not only does it give a real insight into what the game of baseball meant to the players and fans, but helps one understand how the alienation of blacks from big-league play was a great tradgedy to the game. This book makes me wonder how great the game could be today, if this tradgedy had not occurred.
Zehaffy
Robert Peterson (1925-2006) wrote this pioneering history in 1970 when many ex-players were still living. Drawing on interviews, Peterson makes the Negro Leagues come to life. Readers learn of stars like Bullet Joe Rogan, Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson ("the black Babe Ruth"), Cool Papa Bell, Oscar Charleston, etc., and teams like the Kansas City Monarchs, Homestead Grays, Indianapolis Clowns, Chicago American Giants, etc. The Negro Leagues were one of the largest black-owned businesses, though a couple teams (Pittsburgh Crawfords) were run by racketeers. Readers learn about Rube Foster, who founded the Negro National League in 1920, the annual All-Star game in Chicago's Comiskey Park, barnstorming against white big leaguers, and travel conditions that ranged from decent to difficult and discriminatory. There is also an appendix with team rosters and yearly standings.

The Negro Leagues began to fade once Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, and folded completely in 1960 - a sad day signalling a better era. Then this book arrived to bring attention to the Leagues and its players. One, Ted "Double-Duty" Radcliffe (1902-2005), later became a fixture at White Sox games, signing autographs, and throwing out the first ball on his 101st and 102nd birthdays. Another, Buck O'Neill (1911-2006) became an ambassador via the Ken Burns video series "Baseball" and the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City.

Today fans can visit that museum, buy team merchandise, and enjoy several good books on the subject, including I WAS RIGHT ON TIME (by Buck O'Neil), BASEBALL'S GREAT EXPERIMENT and several others. Peterson deserves at least a little credit for this.
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