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Riders of the Purple Sage (Modern Library Classics) ePub download

by William Handley,Zane Grey

  • Author: William Handley,Zane Grey
  • ISBN: 0812966120
  • ISBN13: 978-0812966121
  • ePub: 1558 kb | FB2: 1324 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Action & Adventure
  • Publisher: Modern Library (December 10, 2002)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 738
  • Format: lrf docx lrf rtf
Riders of the Purple Sage (Modern Library Classics) ePub download

Did Zane Grey learn descriptive writing by reading the old masters like Nathaniel Hawthorne or Herman Melville? . And if I may slightly change a line from the book: Go, you riders of the purple sage! Find a copy of the book, open the cover and start reading.

Did Zane Grey learn descriptive writing by reading the old masters like Nathaniel Hawthorne or Herman Melville? Could be. But Zane Grey’s descriptive strength is in delineating the backdrop surroundings. You want an example? How about on page 45, All about him was ridgy roll of wind-smoothed, rain-washed rock. Not a tuft of grass or a bunch of sage colored the dull rust-yellow. He saw where, to the right, this uneven flow of stone ended in a blunt wall. Trust me, you won't regret the time spent.

Riders of the Purple Sage is a Western novel by Zane Grey, first published by Harper & Brothers in 1912.

Home Zane Grey Riders of the Purple Sage. Jane Withersteen gazed down the wide purple slope with dreamy andtroubled eyes

Home Zane Grey Riders of the Purple Sage. Jane Withersteen gazed down the wide purple slope with dreamy andtroubled eyes. A rider had just left her and it was his message thatheld her thoughtful and almost sad, awaiting the churchmen who werecoming to resent and attack her right to befriend a Gentile.

Zane Grey, William R. Handley (Introduction). For one thing, this Riders of the Purple Sage is published by Modern Library. It all began innocently enough. It has I've been bamboozled! Duped!

popularity was neither accidental nor undeserved," wrote Nye. "Few popular novelists have possessed such a grasp of what the public wanted and few have developed Grey's skill at supplying i. show more. Format Paperback 320 pages. William R. Handley is an associate professor of English at the University of Southern California and the author of Marriage, Violence, and the Nation in the American Literary West.

popularity was neither accidental nor undeserved, wrote Nye. Few popular novelists have possessed . Few popular novelists have possessed such a grasp of what the public wanted and few have developed Grey’s skill at supplying it.  . Библиографические данные. Riders of the Purple Sage Modern Library Classics.

This Western Classic Collection is the ultimate book bundle for readers of classic Western. Each masterful novel in this collection has inspired numerous adaptations, re-imaginings, and even whole genres of fiction. This collection contains:, A Voice in the Wilderness by Grace Livingston Hill,Bar-20 Days by Clarence E. Mulford,Cabin Fever by B. M. Bower,Good Indian by . Bower,Heart of the West by O. Henry,Riders of the Purple Sage by Zane Grey,That Girl Montana by Marah Ellis Ryan,The Hidden Children by Robert William Chambers,The Hunted Woman

Secrecy, seduction, captivity, and escape: out of these elements Zane Grey fashioned his magnificent classic of the American West.

The novel that set the pattern for the modern Western, Riders of the Purple Sage was first published in 1912, immediately selling over a million copies. Secrecy, seduction, captivity, and escape: out of these elements Zane Grey fashioned his magnificent classic of the American West.

Книга жанра: Старинная литература, Старинная литература: Прочее. Читать онлайн в библиотеке Booksonline. A SHARP clip-crop of iron-shod hoofs deadened and died away, and clouds of yellow dust drifted from under the cottonwoods out over the sage. Jane Withersteen gazed down the wide purple slope with dreamy and troubled eyes. A rider had just left her and it was his message that held her thoughtful and almost sad, awaiting the churchmen who were coming to resent and attack her right to befriend a Gentile. She wondered if the unrest and strife that.

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Told by a master storyteller who, according to critic Russell Nye, “combined adventure, action, violence, crisis, conflict, sentimentalism, and sex in an extremely shrewd mixture,” Riders of the Purple Sage is a classic of the Western genre. It is the story of Lassiter, a gunslinging avenger in black, who shows up in a remote Utah town just in time to save the young and beautiful rancher Jane Withersteen from having to marry a Mormon elder against her will. Lassiter is on his own quest, one that ends when he discovers a secret grave on Jane’s grounds. “[Zane Grey’s] popularity was neither accidental nor undeserved,” wrote Nye. “Few popular novelists have possessed such a grasp of what the public wanted and few have developed Grey’s skill at supplying it.”
hardy
very pleased
Golkis
awesome buy
Jonide
Could this novel by Zane Grey be the most eminent western ever written? Could be. I haven’t read the two main challengers; Owen Wister’s, The Virginian (1902), or Jack Schaefer’s, Shane (1946), although I did see and love the movie. Did Cormac McCarthy learn how to limit the main characters to four or five after reading this novel? Could be. Did Zane Grey learn descriptive writing by reading the old masters like Nathaniel Hawthorne or Herman Melville? Could be. But Zane Grey’s descriptive strength is in delineating the backdrop surroundings. You want an example? How about on page 45, “All about him was ridgy roll of wind-smoothed, rain-washed rock. Not a tuft of grass or a bunch of sage colored the dull rust-yellow. He saw where, to the right, this uneven flow of stone ended in a blunt wall. Leftward, from the hollow that lay at his feet, mounted a gradual slow-swelling slope to a great height topped by leaning, cracked, and ruined crags.” Does Zane Grey love to use dashes in between words to emphatically enhance his descriptions? Could be. I have always been in awe of the old descriptive writers (it seems to be a lost art), but Zane Grey is the first author that I have read who actually details and emblazons the scenery for the enjoyment of the reader. Well done. Grey has only four main characters, three antagonist and of course hundreds of cattlemen known as Riders of the Purple Sage.

The story is set in 1871 Utah in a village named Cottonwoods. Jane Withersteen has inherited her father’s huge ranch. Her father was a devout Mormon who wanted Jane to marry fellow rancher and Mormon Elder, Tull. Jane, also a God-fearing Mormon, doesn’t love Tull and will not marry him. Except for Jane, the Mormons have no tolerance for Gentiles (any person who isn’t Mormon). As the novel opens, Elder Tull and his men are preparing to whip Jane’s ranch foreman, Bern Venters, because he is a gentile and Tull wants him off Jane’s ranch. Before that can happen, a rider with two black guns shows up. He turns out to be the infamous (to the Mormons) gunslinger, Lassiter. What’s he doing here? Tull and his gang are scared off. The reader finds that Venters was also a very capable gunman, who fell in love with Jane and gave up his guns out of respect for Jane. Lassiter came to Cottonwoods to visit the grave of Milly Erne (who was a friend of Jane). How does Lassiter know Milly? He will not tell. One thing for sure is that Lassiter hates Mormon men, not the women. On page thirty he says to : “Venters, take this from me, these Mormons ain’t just right in their minds. Else could a Mormon marry one woman when he already has a wife, an’ call it duty?” Jane takes Lassiter to see Milly’s grave. He still will not tell Jane how he knows Milly. Jane finds out that the rustler Oldring, along with his mysterious masked rider and his gang have rustled Jane’s red herd (2,500 steer). Venters ask Jane for his guns back with the intention of tracking the stolen herd to Oldring’s secret hideout.

Venters finds the hiding place, but he is attacked by the masked rider and another. He kills both. No, wait the masked rider is still alive. The mask comes off and it is a girl. Who is she? He can’t believe that he shot a woman. Venters finds Surprise Valley, a huge balancing rock and many caves in the cliffs. There he mends the masked girl who’s name is Bess. As she recovers, she tells Venters that she doesn’t want to go back to Oldring. He still doesn’t know who she is. As she recovers, they live in the beautiful secure valley for months. They fall in love. Meanwhile Jane, who secretly helps gentile families, brings a dying Mrs. Larkins and her daughter, Fay, to her ranch. Are the Mormons working with the rustlers to ruin Jane and force her to give up the ranch and marry Tull? Is the gunslinger Lassiter falling in love with Jane? Jane knows that “passionately devoted as she was to her religion, she had refused to marry a Mormon.” This story is ready to explode. Jane's white herd (also 2,500 steer) is also rustled. Will Lassiter give up his guns like Venters did, or will he go into town to kill Mormons? What a story.

Okay, you have met the four main characters: Jane, Lassiter, Venters and Bess. What will happen to them? You have met two of the antagonist: Tull and Oldring, but not the third. The third is Mormon Bishop Dyer. This is not a nice man. What will happen to the bad guys? Do Venters and Bess stay in Surprise Valley or make a break-out for freedom. Can Lassiter give up his gunslinger ways to satisfy Jane’s pious thoughts. What started as a simple western novel became convoluted with a cliff-hanging (I’m using Zane’s dashes) ending. Well, I suggest that you grab a copy of this 1912 western classic to find how this quintessential novel ends.
Itiannta
good, fast service
Alsalar
Riders Of The Purple Sage is one of my all-time favorite novels. It happens to be a Western although I'm not particularly drawn to this genre. Zane Grey's story is riveting with a plot that includes love as well as a compelling mystery which comes together and finally is revealed fully at the end. It takes place in the mid- to late-1800s in Mormon Utah where women are controlled and kept silent by the bullying men -- except for Jane Withersteen who refuses to submit to their torment and to a loveless marriage. She is tragic -- full of untold secrets -- but also strong and determined. Lassiter, a wanted gun man, arrives looking for the grave of his beloved and dead sister, Milly Erne, and interrupts the intended murder of Jane's young ranch hand, Venters. Over time, Lassiter becomes Jane's protector and love slowly grows. Meanwhile, Venters searches for a gang of rustlers who seem to be absconding with Jane's cattle herd and shoots their infamous "masked rider", who surprisingly turns out to be a teenage girl. He finds a hidden valley -- a sort of Shangri La -- where he nurses her back to health and where they eventually grow to love each other. The story then takes off in full force as the mystery deepens, love intensifies and the Mormon bad guys become really nasty. Grey truly is a master story teller. I can't recommend this book highly enough.

The beautifully filmed made-for-TV movie, also available as a DVD at Amazon, is almost better than the book. It stars Ed Harris and Amy Madigan and is so good that I watch it often.
Jark
I love it
Ieregr
There's a pretty good cowboy story tucked away in the cracks of this one, if you're willing to go digging for it. A heroic murderer, a cruel community elder, a gun-toting bishop, a masked rider, and a female Mormon landowner who has the freaking patience of Job and the intense desire to tame herself a cowboy.

Shoot, the opening chapter was pretty damn exciting and didn't hem or haw around about setting up the entire book: Elder Tull hates gentiles and wants to marry Jane, Jane likes gentiles and does NOT want to marry Tull, Elder Tull will ruin Jane's life if necessary, and Lassiter shoots Mormons. Here we freaking go!

But Grey drops the ball. He's at least aware of his weaknesses as a writer (the dialogue, oh goodness), but the exciting scenes are separated by loooong stretches of nothing. There are some interesting twists at the end, but they don't do much to cover the more problematic elements of the story. Biggest is probably the character Bess, who is basically a talking piece of scenery, and Mormons in general are given an uncomfortably broad stroke (the few 'good' ones usually have a guilt complex or are women, or both).

It's kinda fun, though. And while Grey can be an obnoxious trumpet of adjectives, adverbs, and other verbal upchuck, he does set alive a gorgeous, thundering scene every once in a while.
love it
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