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Oath of Fealty ePub download

by Elizabeth Moon

  • Author: Elizabeth Moon
  • ISBN: 0345508742
  • ISBN13: 978-0345508744
  • ePub: 1924 kb | FB2: 1410 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Action & Adventure
  • Publisher: Del Rey; First Edition edition (March 16, 2010)
  • Pages: 496
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 170
  • Format: docx rtf azw txt
Oath of Fealty ePub download

The deed of paksenarrion. Sheepfarmer’s Daughter. As this is a new group of stories, Oath of Fealty is an alternate entry point to the story-universe.

The deed of paksenarrion. com, has a complete list. CHAPTER ONE. Vérella.

But truly, I kept wanting this book to be better, to be more mysterious, to present more conflict and tension about what was going to happen to the characters, but that just never developed.

I can translate for you. Without waiting for Kieri’s word, he bent over the pelvis. This, right here, tells of your birth. See, the background color is that used for sons, and it gives your birthdate, your mother’s name-.

But as Moon’s devoted fans know, she started her career as a fantasy writer.

Oath of Fealty is a 1981 novel by American writer Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, published originally by Phantasia Press, then by Timescape Books, with numerous reprints. Set in the near future, it involves an arcology, a large inhabited structure, called Todos Santos, which rises above a crime-ridden Los Angeles, California, but has little beyond casual contact with the city. The novel popularized the phrase "think of it as evolution in action," which occurs elsewhere in Niven's books.

I’ve said the same to my brother for years, he said. But the Council’s so set against a standing army-though you’re wrong about the effectiveness of the forest rangers. But the Council’s so set against a standing army-though you’re wrong about the effectiveness of the forest rangers ch my formations into the face of the Royal Archers’ blackwood bows, either. I know that Pargunese woman says she wants peace, Kieri said, but she doesn’t rule Pargun. I agree, Aliam said.

She has published more than twenty-five novels, including Nebula Award winner The Speed of Dark, Hugo finalist Remnant Population, and the enduring epic fantasy series The Chronicles of Paksenarrion.

Books related to Oath of Fealty. I have read a lot of Elizabeth Moon's other things and found her to be an amazing and well detailed writer

Books related to Oath of Fealty. I have read a lot of Elizabeth Moon's other things and found her to be an amazing and well detailed writer. When I realized that she had returned to the world that I loved I couldn't be happier. I was not disappointed.

About Oath of Fealty. For the first time in nearly twenty years, Elizabeth Moon returns to the thrilling realm of her superb Deed of Paksenarrion trilogy

About Oath of Fealty. For the first time in nearly twenty years, Elizabeth Moon returns to the thrilling realm of her superb Deed of Paksenarrion trilogy. Thanks to Paks’s courage, the long-vanished heir to the half-elven kingdom of Lyonya has been revealed as Kieri Phelan, a formidable mercenary who earned a title-and enemies-in the neighboring kingdom of Tsaia, where Prince Mikeli suddenly faces the threat of a coup.

Elizabeth Moon’s bestselling science fiction novels featuring Kylara Vatta have earned her rave reviews and comparison to such giants as Robert Heinlein and Lois McMaster Bujold. But as Moon’s devoted fans know, she started her career as a fantasy writer. The superb trilogy known as The Deed of Paksenarrion is widely judged to be one of the great post-Tolkien fantasies, a masterpiece of sustained world-building and realistic military action. Now Moon returns to this thrilling realm for the first time in nearly twenty years. The result: another classic in the making.Thanks to Paks’s courage and sacrifice, the long-vanished heir to the half-elven kingdom of Lyonya has been revealed as Kieri Phelan, a formidable mercenary captain who earned a title—and enemies—in the neighboring kingdom of Tsaia. Now, as Kieri ascends a throne he never sought, he must come to terms with his own half-elven heritage while protecting his new kingdom from his old enemies—and those he has not yet discovered.Meanwhile, in Tsaia, Prince Mikeli prepares for his own coronation. But when an assassination attempt nearly succeeds, Mikeli suddenly faces the threat of a coup. Acting swiftly, Mikeli strikes at the powerful family behind the attack: the Verrakaien, magelords possessing ancient sorcery, steeped in death and evil. Mikeli’s survival—and that of Tsaia—depend on the only Verrakai whose magery is not tainted with innocent blood.      Two kings stand at a pivotal point in the history of their worlds. For dark forces are gathering against them, knit in a secret conspiracy more sinister—and far more ancient—than they can imagine. And even Paks may find her gods-given magic and peerless fighting skills stretched to the limit—and beyond. 
Thordira
I loved THE DEED OF PAKSENARRION. When I saw this paperback in my local bookstore, I looked forward to visiting Paks's world again. A book that picked up where the old trilogy left off was likely to be entertaining and Elizabeth Moon is a master at creating suspense as well as fine characters.

I wasn't prepared for a book that I could hardly put down. Paks, the heroine of the last series, is here but playing a minor role. The book focuses on Kieri Phelan, the newly crowned king of Lyonya, and his concern that his country is ill-prepared to fight a war brewing on its borders.

It follows the adventures of Jandelir Arcolin, a mercenary captain suddenly elevated to lead the whole company.

And it shows the struggles of Dorrin Verrakai discovering late in life that she has illegal magic powers. She must face down her own family and root out the evil they have visited upon the realm of Tsaia.

To those who have read DEED, these will be familiar names, but Moon takes us into their minds and hearts. All these people are approachable in a way that the deeply spiritual Paksenarrion was not--they are warriors, not saints. What they share in common is that each has been elevated far beyond their expectations, each has a sharper sense of evil now abroad in the world and each has had Paksenarrion's shining example to inspire them. The three books of THE DEED OF PAKSENARRION traced the arc of the flung stone; this book shows the ripples spreading out from the center.

Expect high adventure, dark magic and people forced to grow into greatness...epic fantasy of the highest caliber! This book is both a continuation of the series and a renewal...Highly recommended for fantasy fans.
fightnight
Twenty-two years ago, Elizabeth Moon wrote Sheepfarmer's Daughter (Deed of Paksenarrion), which began the story of Paksenarrion Dorthansdotter, who ran away from a forced marriage to become a mercenary solider. Paks' tale continued in Divided Allegiance (The Deed of Paksenarrion, Book 2) and concluded in Oath of Gold (The Deed of Paksenarrion, Book 3). The entire trilogy was later published as a single volume, The Deed of Paksenarrion: A Novel. The end of the trilogy was very well done, especially for a first novel, but it left any number of loose ends. Paks' "Deed" had left entire countries in disarray.

Moon returned to Paks' world with two prequels, but both were pretty dark. They have never been as popular as "Deed." And, besides, they offered only the barest hints of what happened in Paks' time after the events of "Deed."

Now, at last, with "Oath of Fealty," Moon has returned to the world and time of Paksenarrion. While we have had to wait a very long time to hear the rest of the story, the good news is that Ms. Moon's formidable plotting and writing skills have improved over the years. ""Fealty" is a page turner, even more than "Oath of Gold" was. We follow events across the Eight Kingdoms and even into Aarenis as the impact of Paks' actions spread across her world. The story picks up the evening of Duke Phelan's arrival in Lyonya - the last scene in "Deed" - and follows the very different consequences for the Duke's captains, Dorrin and Arcolin, for the Crown Prince of Tsaia and other major and minor characters from "Deed." Paks herself appears, but she is a relatively minor character in "Fealty," important but not the focus of the story. Despite the lapse of 22 years, the characters and events are consistent; too often, in late-arriving sequels, there are annoying inconsistencies and contradictions. Not here.

According to Moon's blog, this is the first of a projected trilogy. Certainly some of the characters are left in peril at the end of "Fealty," and there are important plot threads left unresolved. But this is a complete novel, just as the books in the first trilogy were. It is also an immensely satisfying read. Dorrin, in particular, is well-written and has moments that the 22-year younger Moon probably could not have written.

Bravo, Ms. Moon. Exceptionally well done. While Moon has written "Fealty" so it can be read without having read "Deed," I suggest that "Fealty" will be much more satisfying if you read "Deed" first.

My very highest recommendation. I very much look forward to the next book.
Oso
I've never read Moon before, so I came at this book without the background of the earlier Paks series.

The book kept me interested enough to read it, which is why it gets 3 stars. But truly, I kept wanting this book to be better, to be more mysterious, to present more *conflict* and tension about what was going to happen to the characters, but that just never developed. To be honest, the book felt a little "workmanlike", as if the author had to put out another book and went through the motions of producing fantasy, but was a little tapped out in terms of truly interesting plot. To her credit, what she does, she does relatively well; but I'm curious as to whether her earlier books showed more passion and fire.

Most of you have probably read plenty of Moon before, so the following is probably old hat: Moon presents a distinctly military approach to writing. She is listed in the book as an "ex marine", and she clearly seems to relish drawing on that background, taking great pains to lay out command and control structures, the life of someone in the military (adjusted to a fantasy setting of course), etc. That's fine: you have to write what you know. I don't find it particularly compelling myself, but I do at least appreciate the fact that here we are dealing with someone who knows what they are talking about. So many fantasy authors romanticize and fantasize warfare and armies without having any concept of the reality behind them.

Where the book falls down for me is that everything is just *too easy* for the main characters, particularly Dorrin. I think the most glaring example of this is that this woman, who has never known anything about magic and who has followed a religion that bans magic, is basically handed super magic powers with nothing more than a page or two of discussion about how they were "awakened" and then trained. From that point on, she is a virtual wrecking ball of magic, effortlessly outdueling entire legions of magic users, magic users who had gained their abilities from hideous human sacrifice rituals. What did Dorrin do? It's like the author needed to find a way to make Dorrin safe from her magic enemies, could think of nothing else, and just decided "hey, she is just a natural magician". Dorrin does not need to learn to control her very powerful magic, there is no cost to her in using it, she does not need to take time to cast spells but instead it just instantly jumps to her use. What fun is that? Go read, say, Stephen Donaldson's White Gold Wielder for an example of the kind of strain and sacrifice a protagonist must endure to have any access to their magic power.

You know what this is like? It's like playing a first-person shooter with the "invulnerable" cheat codes on. Sure, when you're 12 you think it's fun to be able to go through the world infinitely powerful and invulnerable, but it quickly loses its charm because there's no *drama*.

And that's what this book lacked for me: drama. I never felt like there were any real conflicts (the notable exception being the demonic possession of the sargeant in the southern story). Time after time, the protagonists wanted to do something and immediately proceeded to do so. The southern captain wanted to defeat brigands, and everything he did just worked. He was able to manipulate bankers, he was able to outwit bandits and win battles, all seemingly too easy. The protagonists all feel like they have "cheat codes" on.
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