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Jeremy Thrane: A Novel ePub download

by Kate Christensen

  • Author: Kate Christensen
  • ISBN: 0385720343
  • ISBN13: 978-0385720342
  • ePub: 1663 kb | FB2: 1721 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Literature & Fiction
  • Publisher: Anchor; Reprint edition (June 11, 2002)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 933
  • Format: mbr azw doc lit
Jeremy Thrane: A Novel ePub download

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Kate Christensen's 'Jeremy Thrane' is crisp, fresh, full of beautiful metaphors and right on the money when depicting the lives and loves of gay men. It's amazing that (I'm assuming) a straight woman could write so eloquently from a gay man's point of view. As a gay man I found myself laughing aloud at certian situations, identifying wholeheartedly with a lot of Jeremy's viewpoints and gasping at the incredible similarities of Jeremy's friends to some of my own.

Jeremy Thrane is a writer in love with a married ma.

Jeremy Thrane is a writer in love with a married man. For years, Jeremy has posed as "archivist" to Ted Masterson, a Hollywood action star. Jeremy maintains Ted's New York brownstone and guards the secret that could destroy his career.

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Jeremy Thrane seems to have everything. As the long-time boyfriend of the handsome (but deeply closeted) movie star Ted Masterson, he lives rent-free in a beautiful apartment on the top floor of Ted's Manhattan brownstone and has an easy job that gives him plenty of time to read books and write his novel.

Kate Christensen (born August 22, 1962) is an American novelist. She won the 2008 PEN/Faulkner Award for her fourth novel, The Great Man, about a painter and the three women in his life. Her previous novels are In the Drink (1999), Jeremy Thrane (2001), and The Epicure's Lament (2004). Her fifth novel, Trouble (2009), was released in paperback by Vintage/Anchor in June 2010. Her sixth novel, The Astral, was published in hardcover by Doubleday in June 2011.

Jeremy Thrane seems to have everything

Jeremy Thrane seems to have everything. As the long-time boyfriend of the handsome (but deeply closeted) movie star Ted Masterson, he lives rent-free in a beautiful apartment on the top floor of Ted’s Manhattan brownstone and has an easy job that gives him plenty of time to read books and write his novel. When an influential gossip columnist overhears Jeremy talking about Ted, Jeremy’s perfect world begins to crumble: in just a few hours Ted asks him to leave. Although Ted says he needs to spend more time with his wife and daughter, Jeremy suspects another man is involved.

by. Christensen, Kate, 1962-. Jeremy is 35, unemployed, working on novel, and living in a fabulous townhouse in Gramercy Park. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. For his entire adult life, he has been discreetly provided for by Ted Masterson, an action-movie star married to an equally famous actress. Jeremy finds himself in the unenviable position of learning to create a life in his mid-30s.

Scott must have gone to Matt’s; the apartment was empty. While the coffee brewed, I poured some of the sunflower seeds I’d bought on my way home last night into the dish in Juanita’s cage.

Broadway Books, 2001 - 308 sivua. Jeremy Thrane’s comfortable world is about to be turned on its head. Jeremy Thrane: A Novel Kate Christensen Rajoitettu esikatselu - 2011. Jeremy Thrane is a writer in love with a married man. Having for years been in the employ of his lover Tom, living in his New York home and running his affairs, he is about to be thrown. Jeremy Thrane Kate Christensen Esikatselu ei käytettävissä - 2002. Yleiset termit ja lausekkeet.

Jeremy Thrane seems to have everything. As the long-time boyfriend of the handsome (but deeply closeted) movie star Ted Masterson, he lives rent-free in a beautiful apartment on the top floor of Ted's Manhattan brownstone and has an easy job that gives him plenty of time to read books and write his novel. When an influential gossip columnist overhears Jeremy talking about Ted, Jeremy's perfect world begins to crumble: in just a few hours Ted asks him to leave. Although Ted says he needs to spend more time with his wife and daughter, Jeremy suspects another man is involved. With little more than his books, his sprawling manuscript, and his fickle little bird Juanita, Jeremy finds that he needs to re-connect with the eccentric family whose love he has taken for granted, and determine which of his friends have his true well-being in mind. In a dizzying world of art galleries, rock clubs, trendy restaurants, casual sex, dry wit, and drier martinis, Jeremy Thrane must finally figure out what it means to grow up and fall in love.
Landamath
Ever since I read In the Drink, I have become a fan of Kate Christensen. In the Drink was filled with the kind of dark humor that I enjoy in fiction. I also enjoyed her realistic view of New York City. She didn't romanticize the city -- she showed it for what it was. It was a very clever satire. So I was eager to pick up her second novel.
Jeremy Thrane is the tale of a gay man in his mid-thirties who's had a secret affair with a famous film star named Ted for ten years. Ted is married to a famous movie actress. Both his wife and the media are unaware of his homosexuality. The novel takes some humorous, poignant and sometimes unexpected turns.
The novel is well written, however, there are some things that were left floating in the story. For instance, Ted seldom appears in the novel. Character and story development were needed throughout the novel. Christensen needed to delve into and explore some of the secondary characters.
All and all, it was a satisfactory read. It is not as dark and sinister as In the Drink, but it's nevertheless a great read. Kate has a way with words, and I recommend her lyrical and witty novels most highly.
DABY
This is the first book I've read by Kate Christensen and I enjoyed it so much that I immediately bought her first novel, In The Drink (which I have yet to read). Her gift for narrative and description is beyond measure, and the storyline and characters were beautifully crafted. I gave it 4 out of 5 stars because I did feel the story tended to drag in spots; whole sections of the book spanned a single day. Also, there was not one character in the book I didn't find less than sympathetic (including Jeremy himself), and I have to admit I found the recurring nonchalant references to incest and pedophilia more than a little disturbing -- must be a gay-culture phenomenon I'm not aware of?
Peles
My creative writing professor used to teach us, "Edit, edit, and then edit some more." I think Kate Christensen could have benefitted from that advice. Her novel JEREMY THRANE contains about 50 pages of actual story; the rest is gobbledygook. Christensen likes to bore her readers with too many unnecessary details. There's too much telling and not enough showing. For example: "I went to the men's room, where I relieved my bladder of the remains of the pint of orange juice I'd downed on my way to work..." Who cares? Was this necessary? The story would have been the same if not for this mundane, descript detail.

As the reader, I'm never involved in Jeremy's world. I'm an outsider looking in through a dirty window, being told the most mundane details about the life of someone I don't even care for.

The story is positioned as a story about Jeremy, a gay man, being kicked out of his in-the-closet Hollywood boyfriend Ted's place, and having to fend for himself. Along the way, he grows up and discovers what love is. Sounds interesting, right? Too bad I never got a sense of that reading JEREMY THRANE. In truth, Ted is barely in the book and I'm not quite sure Jeremy grows or learns to love by the time the novel is over. Jeremy declines Ted's offer of being financially kept and then whines that he has to go out in the real world and find a job. He shoots down every potential love interest because he feels he's too good for them. In the end, he still criticizes the music of the last guy he meets, so I didn't really see any growth.

JEREMY THRANE also presents too many characters. Edit, edit, and then edit some more. If you've ever seen the episode of "Will & Grace" where Grace sets up Will with an arrogant client to get his business, you'll know what I'm referring to. Christensen throws around so many names that the reader has no idea who is who and, therefore, never feels connected to any of them.

"And maybe my unwillingness to compromise my idealized, archaic insistence on authenticity weighed me down like a cargo of lead and sand while everyone else raced lightly on ahead, realizing their ambitions, finding mates, moving on to fulfilled and carefree lives, unhampered by useless pangs of conscience, uncircumcised by all this superannuated deadweight I seemed to have mistaken for ballast."

Like in the above sentence, Christensen tries to sound "intelligent" by using all the words from her 11th grade vocabulary test and then uses the word(?) "gook" twice in a couple of pages apart. Which is she trying to be? Literary and deep? Or trying to sound cool? I'd prefer cool and conversational, but "gook" is as close as she comes.

EDIT, EDIT, AND THEN EDIT SOME MORE.

"I should have drunk more last night; half-assed hangovers did nothing to alter my sense of reality the way really sintelating [sic] ones could, rubbing off all the sharp edges from experience, sealing me in an invalid cocoon of cheerful relaxed semiderangement that allowed me to pretend to be someone else for its duration, someone happy-go-lucky and frivolous and somewhat dim." Holy run-on sentence, Batman!

"He was holding, I couldn't help noticing, a package of those pressed seaweed sheets they rolled sushi with. I knew what they were called but preferred not to even think the word for fear of somehow appearing to legitimize his whole Japanese affectation in any way and having this show on my face." Huh? Who cares? Call 'em seaweed sheets and call it a day!

EDIT, EDIT, AND THEN EDIT SOME MORE. Too many minute details about nothing consequential really bored this reader.

Lastly, the subplot of Jeremy's estranged father seems like an afterthought...and not a very good one. Jeremy writes a novel about what he imagines happened to his dad after he up and left the family. "Angus in Efes" is the title of his debut novel. (Angus?) Unfortunately, we, the readers, are "treated" to excerpts from Jeremy's novel about his father's imagined exploits that is even more boring than Jeremy's own story. And when he finally contacts his father at the end, it's rather anticlimactic, which seems to be a running theme throughout the novel.

"I thought the book was well written and imaginative. I'm not sure about the plot, but what does plot matter in contemporary novels, isn't that right?" Straight from the author's mouth.
Vudogal
Kate Christensen's books are all written in a true, honest voice wether it be young/old/male/female voice. It's easy to love her writing. She can write with the best. Gripping.
Manazar
Um, no. This book really doesn't work. Yes, it has many nice details, Yes the author creates a NYC that rings true. But no, I did not care about any of the characters, it took far too long to move itself along and once it did, I was left feeling...why? I loved IN THE DRINK and felt it was brilliant. As much as I loved that book, I disliked this one. It felt like material that had originally not made the cut for IN THE DRINK. This may not be the case, but that is the feeling.
Darkshaper
This is the first time I read Christensen, the deep characterization of Jeremy is the best attribute of this book, but the author made all the other characters stick as well. I would love to read a standalone book about Sebastian. She missed nothing with this book, is really good, witty and charming.
Xarcondre
I bought this book after reading (and enjoying) Christensen's In the Drink. The reviews assured me that if I liked In the Drink, I would love Jeremy Thrane. Boy, were they wrong! Now, don't get me wrong. I read Jeremy Thrane quickly and enjoyed it. There's nothing "wrong" with this book. It's just very different than In the Drink, and, in my humble opinion, not as "good."
Like In the Drink, Jeremy Thrane is written with a first-person voice, which I enjoy. Unlike, In the Drink, however, I feel, well, very aware of the face that our narrator is, well, narrating. Many of the narrator's comments, thoughts, etc. seemed very contrived, and, overall, detract from the book's "flow."
If you're looking for a book that reads quickly, is written decently, and comments on "celebrity culture," a gay man's life in NYC or... just "hip" life in general, Jeremy Thrane won't disappoint. If, however, like me, you're looking for a follow-up to In the Drink, keep looking.
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