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Dorian: An Imitation ePub download

by Will Self

  • Author: Will Self
  • ISBN: 0802117295
  • ISBN13: 978-0802117298
  • ePub: 1124 kb | FB2: 1197 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Literature & Fiction
  • Publisher: Grove Pr; 1st Edition edition (January 2003)
  • Pages: 288
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 281
  • Format: rtf lrf docx lit
Dorian: An Imitation ePub download

Will Self''s DORIAN is a "shameless imitation" of Oscar Wilde''s The Picture of Dorian Gray that reimagines the novel in the milieu of London''s early-80s art scene, which for liberated homosexuals were a golden era of sex, drugs.

Will Self''s DORIAN is a "shameless imitation" of Oscar Wilde''s The Picture of Dorian Gray that reimagines the novel in the milieu of London''s early-80s art scene, which for liberated homosexuals were a golden era of sex, drugs and decadence before the AIDS epidemic struck later in the decade. It is "an age in which appearances matter more and more and more. Will Self''s DORIAN is a "shameless imitation" of Oscar Wilde''s The Picture of Dorian Gray that reimagines the novel in the milieu of London''s early-80s art scene, which for liberated homosexuals were a golden era of sex, drugs and decadence before the AIDS epidemic struck later in the decade.

Dorian, an Imitation is a British novel by Will Self. The book is a modern take on Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray. The novel was originally published by Viking Press in 2002 and subsequently by Penguin in 2003. Self was originally asked to adapt the Wilde novel into a film screenplay, but this project did not come to fruition. Instead, Self took this uncompleted screenplay and re-worked it into a novel, which he described as "an imitation - and a homage" to the Wilde original.

Dorian - Will Self's brilliant 'imitation' of Oscar Wilde's original tainted love story

Dorian - Will Self's brilliant 'imitation' of Oscar Wilde's original tainted love story. Brutal, savage, infinitely readable' Observer. Chilling, hysterical, tasteless and haunting. A Gothic thriller complementing and enriching its original' Independent on Sunday. In the summer of 1981, aristocratic, drug-addicted Henry Wooten and Warhol-acolyte Baz Hallward meet Dorian Gray. Will Self is the author of nine novels including Cock and Bull; My Idea of Fun; Great Apes; How the Dead Live; Dorian, an Imitation; The Book of Dave; The Butt; Walking to Hollywood and Umbrella, which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize.

Dorian, An Imitation book. Dorian, an Imitation is a British novel by Will Self. Instead, Self took this uncompleted Dorian, an Imitation is a British novel by Will Self.

And how does Dorian remain so youthful? Will Self's excoriating new novel . Will Self will deliver the closing address at the 2015 Melbourne Writers Festival (MWF) 2015. Dorian: An Imitation.

And how does Dorian remain so youthful? Will Self's excoriating new novel is set against the AIDS crises of the '80s and '90s, and is a shameless reworking of our most shameless classic novel. I really don't think this book is for everyone-for example, I would never pass this one along to my father to read. The descriptions Self gives of drug use and homosexual acts are vivid and. عاينة المستخدمين - whitewavedarling - LibraryThing.

Dorian: An Imitation by Will Self Viking £1. 9, pp288. In The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde set the gold standard for chroniclers of decadence. The story of a man who remains eternally young while his portrait ages provided the framework for Wilde's whimsical but vicious depiction of the fin de siècle. For more than a decade, Will Self has been writing Wildean narratives of corruption and metamorphosis, and now he confronts the master head-on in an 'imitation' of Dorian Gray which does for the Diana generation what Wilde did for the late Victorians.

by Will Self (Author). With all his ingenuity Will Self has overloaded the book. The same can be said also about his clever but excessive use of Wilde type epigrams.

Will Self's DORIAN is a "shameless imitation" of Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray that reimagines the novel in the milieu of London's early-80s art scene, which for liberated homosexuals were a golden era of sex, drugs and decadence before the AIDS epidemic struck later in the decade.

Shamefully, Self does not even stand by Dorian's serial transgressions of taste. But the rictus sneer of this book isn't so readily reversed, nor its cheap flippancy concerning Aids, and its hostile prurience towards homosexuality. A fumbled epilogue reworks the preceding pages as Wotton's lying manuscript, born of his jealous, virus-laden imagination: "It wasn't simply that Dorian hadn't contracted Aids, it was also that he'd genuinely cared for those who ha.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Dorian - Will Self's brilliant 'imitation' of Oscar Wilde's original tainted love story 'Brutal, savage, infinitely readable' Observer'Chilling, hysterical, tasteless and haunti. Dorian - Will Self's brilliant 'imitation' of Oscar Wilde's original tainted love story 'Brutal, savage, infinitely readable' Observer'Chilling, hysterical, tasteless and haunting. A Gothic thriller complementing and enriching its original' Independent on SundayIn the summer of 1981, aristocratic, drug-addicted Henry Wooten and Warhol-acolyte Baz Hallward meet Dorian Gray. Dorian is a golden adonis - perfect, pure and (so far) deliciously uncorrupted

A contemporary retelling of Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray" set against the backdrop of the AIDS epidemic finds Henry Wotton at the center of a clique that includes his friend, Hallward, and the beautiful young Dorian.
The Sphinx of Driz
Judging by its title, I at first thought that Will Self had in mind the ambitious goal of writing a viable version of "The Picture of Dorian Gray" set in the age of AIDS and drugs, while at the same time daring the reader to compare his novel to the original. To set himself up for this inevitable comparison with a master like Wilde, he pulls the reader in from the very beginning with his spectacular stylistic prowess. Though quite faithful to the original, he soon transcends it and uses the Dorian Gray story as an instrument in an exploration of the uneven flow of time, and of the interplay between physical time, historical time and biological time.
Youth, venerated almost religiously in our days, is of course defined in terms of biological time, and when the flow of biological time comes to a standstill in Dorian, some form of time keeps flowing on in the artistic rendering of Dorian, the painting in Wilde, the video installation in Self. This artistic rendering is the one that provides a picture of our age for future generations, and thus the time that flows in it is historical time.
By contrast the lifestyle of the Wottons and their friends gives the appearance of historical time at a standstill, while biological time is flowing inexorably, driving many of these people to early deaths by disease (mainly AIDS) originating in this very lifestyle.
Maybe Mr. Self's most original creation is Henry Wotton's neighbor, the "jiggling man" who metes out the seconds of physical time for Wotton's existence.
Whether reading Wilde or Self, the picture/installation is an extremely clever, but also an extremely contrived device. Will Self deals with this problem by attaching a both shocking and very ingenious epilogue in which everything that has gone before is revealed to have been fiction written by Henry Wotton. This fiction in turn has an immense impact on Dorian Gray's "real" life and in the last ten pages or so the interplay between fiction and reality --- or more precisely between a fiction within a fiction and a reality within a fiction --- becomes the main focus. This is a very interesting and major issue in its own right, and this epilogue does not do it justice, nor could it. With all his ingenuity Will Self has overloaded the book. The same can be said also about his clever but excessive use of Wilde type epigrams. As an example, he has Wotton commenting on Baz' death with the following paraphrase of Lady Bracknell ("The The Importance of Being Earnest") "For Baz to have died once would have been unfortunate; for him to die twice looks like carelessness." I found this funny but also over the top.
These problems aside, "Dorian" is a thought-provoking and extremely well-written novel well deserving the reader's attention.
PanshyR
When I ordered this book I was really looking forward to it. I have enjoyed quite a few of Will Self's other books but, I was disappointed. Self's writing is still clever, his characterizations of bitter old queens is fabulous, the setting was very good. His placement of the story at the dawn of the AIDS era was very smart, however the book itself falls flat. There are bright spots here and there, but the story as a whole seems lackluster.

I feel the ending was a bit of overkill and entirely unecessary. All in all despite Will Self's wit, I don't really recommend this particular book.
Dainris
Bought this on recommendation of a friend and very glad I did. It's an interesting, more modern take on the great Oscar Wilde's lone novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray. I'd definitely recommend it...as long as a little vulgarity doesn't scare you. :P
Jozrone
...but I'd rather be one of the few who finds pleasure in Self's perversity than one of the many who see only perveristy in such pleasures (as those of the wanton that is Self's Henry Wotton).

Perhaps you should skip this tale if you:

) rarely find reinterpretations as enjoyable -- note that this is not the same as 'good' -- as an original or 'classic'

) are offended by repeated discussions of drugs, sex, homosexuality, precious bodily fluids, et cetera

) haven't read any of his other works; or have, and don't like such

) don't like it when authors make much wordplay or use obscure vocabulary which might require the reader to visit a dictionary

Note: I am a big fan of Mr. Self. You also may find his writing very entertaining if you don't fall into any of the above buckets. If you're interested in checking for yourself, I would recommend the short story collection _Grey Area_ or the novel _Great Apes_. (The only major book of his that I did not find highly enjoyable was _How the Dead Live_, which was a little tedious.)

So there you have my opinion. It's just that. But do take the reviews of those who panned this book as such as well. There's no accounting for taste; however, I personally recommend that you taste this account of a modern Dorian Gray. Terrible, I know;).
Dusar
This is an excellent updating of Oscar Wilde's Dorian Gray, moving the action up to the 1980s-1990s of London, New York, and LA. The prose style is rich and erudite. The pages are larded with faux Wilde epigrams that sparkle and shimmer.

What keeps it interesting, even when you think you know where it's going, is that there are two very interesting twists at the end. I would like to think that Wilde would approve. Lots of famous names are dropped: Warhol, Princess Di, Barbara Bush, Versace, etc., so our more modern times of pop culture are vividly portrayed.

The novel is often graphic in its detail of the free-living Manhattan sex clubs right before (and then full into) the AIDS era. The scenes involving drug usage are not for the squeamish. The vocabulary alternates between the philosophy classroom and the filthy gutter.

Some of the characterizations are marvelous, especially a rich old guy called The Ferret. I was amazed at how the author stayed so close to the original, yet made everything seem his own.
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