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A Conflict of Rights: The Supreme Court and Affirmative Action ePub download

by Melvin I. Urofsky

  • Author: Melvin I. Urofsky
  • ISBN: 0684190699
  • ISBN13: 978-0684190693
  • ePub: 1188 kb | FB2: 1930 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Rules & Procedures
  • Publisher: Scribner; First Printing edition (February 1, 1991)
  • Pages: 270
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 589
  • Format: lrf doc lrf lit
A Conflict of Rights: The Supreme Court and Affirmative Action ePub download

A Conflict of Rights book. Urofsky's defense of affirmative action offers a view of a fairer, more productive society.

A Conflict of Rights book. Online Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound.

A thoughtful consideration of the paradoxes of affirmative action. Urofsky (History & Law/Virginia Commonwealth Univ. is the author of Louis D. Brandeis and the Progressive Tradition (1980), etc. Urofsky centers his discussion on the US Supreme Court's 1987 landmark decision Johnson v. Transportation Agency, Santa Clara County, which resulted from a challenge to an affirmative-action program in the Transportation Department of Santa Clara County, Cal.

Melvin I. Urofsky is Professor of Law & Public Policy and Professor . Urofsky is Professor of Law & Public Policy and Professor Emeritus of History at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). ; A Conflict of Rights: The Supreme Court and Affirmative Action (1991); Letting Go: Death, Dying and the Law (1994); Division and Discord: The Supreme Court under Stone and Vinson, 1941-1953 (1997); Lethal Judgments: Assisted Suicide and American Law (2000); Money and Speech: The Supreme Court and Campaign Finance Reform (2005)

by Melvin I. Urofsky.

by Melvin I. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780684190693.

Urofsky, Melvin I. Format: Book.

A CONFLICT OF RIGHTS The Supreme Court and Affirmative Action. By Melvin I. Those favoring affirmative action maintain that a social and economic spoils system has been restricted for generations to white men engaged in their own affirmative action. 270 pp. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. Affirmative action is an issue about which relatively small segments of the population hold ferociously strong and opposing views while the bewildered majority leans one way and then the other, depending on how the question is framed. To correct that imbalance, women and minority group members must be given special breaks.

About Melvin I.

Find nearly any book by Melvin I Urofsky (page 2). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Division and Discord: The Supreme Court Under Stone and Vinson, 1941-1953 (Chief Justiceships of the United States Supreme Court). ISBN 9781570031205 (978-1-57003-120-5) Hardcover, Univ of South Carolina Pr, 1997.

She does cover hot button social issues such as abortion and affirmative action.

The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work. She does cover hot button social issues such as abortion and affirmative action. She also describes the political wrangling between conservative groups, liberal groups, White House Counsel, the president and the members of the Supreme Court itself. The preparation that each nominee goes through is eye-opening.

Melvin Urofsky explores affirmative action in relation to sex, gender, and .

Melvin Urofsky explores affirmative action in relation to sex, gender, and education and shows that nearly every public university in the country has at one time or another instituted some form of affirmative action plan-some successful, others no. In this important, ambitious, far-reaching book, Urofsky writes about the affirmative action cases decided by the Supreme Court: cases that either upheld or struck down particular plans that affected both governmental and private entities.

An account of the Supreme Court's decision affirming Diane Joyce's selection over Paul Johnson for a dispatcher's position
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