» » A More Obedient Wife: A Novel of the Early Supreme Court

A More Obedient Wife: A Novel of the Early Supreme Court ePub download

by Natalie Wexler

  • Author: Natalie Wexler
  • ISBN: 0615135161
  • ISBN13: 978-0615135168
  • ePub: 1211 kb | FB2: 1280 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Thrillers & Suspense
  • Publisher: Kalorama Press (October 18, 2007)
  • Pages: 452
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 118
  • Format: mbr docx lit rtf
A More Obedient Wife: A Novel of the Early Supreme Court ePub download

A More Obedient Wife book. Wexler has mixed a fictional story about the lives of 2 Supreme Court wives with historical letters between and about them and members of their inner circles. The story itself was engaging.

A More Obedient Wife book. I found I needed the real letters to periodically remind me that I was reading a story. At the same time, I felt like those same letters interrupted the flow of the story. I applaud the Wexler for the taking the risk and using a non-traditional approach to storytelling, but this jury is still out on whether or not it worked.

A More Obedient Wife is organized as a series of diary entries by two wives named Hannah, both married to early Supreme Court Justices. Hannah Johnston Iredell, a meek worry-wort in her 40s, is married to Justice James Iredell, a North Carolina lawyer with a roving eye. Hannah Gray Wilson, a 19-year-old beauty, is married to Justice James Wilson, a prominent legal scholar 30 years her senior and one of only six men who signed both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. At the same time, I felt like those same letters interrupted the flow I can't decide if I liked this book well enough to recommend it to others. I enjoyed the story, but am torn about the manner in which it's put together.

A More Obedient Wife" is an award-winning novel that blends fact and fiction to tell the story of two women-married to two early Supreme Court Justices-who find themselves swept up in the events of the federal government’s.

A More Obedient Wife" is an award-winning novel that blends fact and fiction to tell the story of two women-married to two early Supreme Court Justices-who find themselves swept up in the events of the federal government’s turbulent first decade.

Wexler's first novel, A More Obedient Wife, is based on the lives and letters of two early Supreme Court justices and their wives. The Documentary History of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1789-1800 (2003). Her second novel, The Mother Daughter Show, is a satire set at an elite Washington, DC private school, where the mothers of graduating senior girls write and perform an annual musical revue.

Hannah Gray is just nineteen when she meets the distinguished-and apparently wealthy-Supreme Court Justice James Wilson, a 51-year-old widower with six children

Hannah Gray is just nineteen when she meets the distinguished-and apparently wealthy-Supreme Court Justice James Wilson, a 51-year-old widower with six children. Marrying him after an acquaintance of only ten days, Hannah soon discovers that her new husband is not all that he appears: Wilson is thrown into debtors’ prison while still a sitting Supreme Court Justice, causing a major scandal. Meanwhile, another Hannah, married to Wilson’s Supreme Court colleague James Iredell, suffers from debilitating shyness.

More Praise for "A More Obedient Wife". com User, April 8, 2007. Reading Natalie Wexler's novel provided me with that wonderful experience of being so riveted, so engaged, so caught in the tale being spun that I literally could not put the book down. Travel back in time and meet her remarkable (and very real) characters. You won't be disappointed.

Set against the turbulent background of the 1790s, this novel blends excerpts from over 100 letters and other .

Set against the turbulent background of the 1790s, this novel blends excerpts from over 100 letters and other 18th-century documents with speculation to create an engaging tale of four real historical figures-two Supreme Court Justices (James Iredell and James Wilson) and their respective wives. Told from the points of view of the two women, the fictional narrative of A More Obedient Wife fleshes out the bare bones of the historical record, bringing its long-dead characters to vivid life and centering on timeless themes of love, friendship, and betrayal.

Wexler's first novel, A More Obedient Wife, is based on the lives and letters of two early Supreme Court justices and their wives Selected publications.

A More Obedient Wife, a Novel of the Early Supreme Court. She was likely never to be anything more amazing than a mother and wife, who would entertain the Honiton Embroidery Circle twice a year

A More Obedient Wife, a Novel of the Early Supreme Court. The Chaneysville Incident: A Novel. She was likely never to be anything more amazing than a mother and wife, who would entertain the Honiton Embroidery Circle twice a year. Yet, potentially, Una Golden was as glowing as any princess of balladry. She was waiting for the fairy prince, though he seemed likely to be nothing more decorative than a salesman in a brown derby.

A unique blend of actual 18th-century letters and sensitively imagined fiction, A More Obedient Wife tells the story of two women in the 1790s-each in a troubled marriage to a Supreme Court Justice-swept up in the little-known but fascinating early his

Laitchai
When it is taught at all these days, history is often taught badly. The humanity is wrung out of it, and we are left thinking of our ancestors as aliens, bereft of feelings.
A good novel can set us straight, reminding us of what we have in common with those who came before us. Natalie Wexler's "A More Obedient Wife" is just such a novel, despite its rather lackluster title.
Its premise seems unpromising at first. Who can imagine caring about the lives, triumphs, and tragedies of two American Supreme Court justices, both named James, and and their wives, both named Hannah? Read the first 10 pages of "A More Obedient Wife," and chances are excellent that YOU will care--a lot.
The characters of Wexler's book are historical; and most of it takes place during the Federalist era--roughly, the Presidency of George Washington. We tend to think of this as a placid time, with the Revolution over and the United States finally free. But the author, who knows the era well, is quick to remind us that it was a time of personal and political discomforts, of plagues, of looming threats like the slavery issue that would engulf and almost destroy the nation.
In short, just as Wexler's characters are not that different from us, so the dangers of the time in which they lived are not much less dangerous than those we face.
Linn
While this is not the novel of the century, it is worth reading for the picture it gives of the times in which it is set--1790-
1798 in fledgling America. The husbands of the two women featured are members of the first United States Supreme
Court and that provides extra interest. Original diaries and letters written by the main characters are interspersed with
sections by Wexler to form a novel and we see that the concerns of women of that period, except for career aspirations,
do not differ greatly from those of today.
Beranyle
The author, Natalie Wexler, brought our early history to life in A More Obedient Wife. Who would imagine the lives (marriages) of two Supreme Court Justices in the late 1700s could be page-turner material? Ms. Wexler uses actual letters found in research as the bases for this historical fiction.

If you enjoy early American history, and delight in relationships, you will love this book.
Walan
This was an excellent book; I couldn't put it down. The author did a great job of telling a story using factual letters and accounts and her own imagination.
Uris
The inspiration for this entertaining first novel was the author's work as associate editor of the Documentary History of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1789-1880. But don't let that scare you off.

A More Obedient Wife is organized as a series of diary entries by two wives named Hannah, both married to early Supreme Court Justices. Hannah Johnston Iredell, a meek worry-wort in her 40s, is married to Justice James Iredell, a North Carolina lawyer with a roving eye. Hannah Gray Wilson, a 19-year-old beauty, is married to Justice James Wilson, a prominent legal scholar 30 years her senior and one of only six men who signed both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

Wexler effectively intersperses the women's fictional diary entries with actual letters that are set in italics. It's fun to read fact and fiction side-by-side and to see glimpses of the human side of Adams, Washington and other American Revolution household names.

Especially riveting is Wexler's attention to details of daily life in New York, Philadelphia, and North Carolina in the 1790s, such as the strange medical practices and home remedies employed to ward off yellow fever and influenza. If you enjoyed David McCullough's John Adams or one of the many collections of letters between Revolutionary era figures, Wexler's tale will please.

Reviewed by Carole Walters

**IndieReader gives this book 3.5 stars**
Slowly writer
I just finished reading A More Obedient Wife. The only part I didn't like is that it ended. This is a real sleeper that I recommend to anyone regardless of age, gender, or reading preference.

Take me, for example: I started the book with no expectation of finishing it, much less enjoying it. It just so happened that I ran across it while I was temporarily out of reading material.

I skimmed a few pages and put the book down. I prefer action stuff. I came back a short while later. Hannah Iredell had grown on me. I admired her. I couldn't get her out of my head. I simply had to find out what would happen to her.

It didn't hurt one bit that the writing is smooth. Natalie Wexler's feel for the rhythm of the language can't be taught or learned. When I run across it, which is rare, I know I am in the hands of a born writer, the real McCoy. Never mind what genre.

This story is told primarily through the diaries of two women wedded to US Supreme Court Justices in the late 1700's. The story unfolds also through excerpts from letters. All the diary entries and the excerpts are fascinating, sometimes spine-tingling, always moving, and never too long or too short. The excerpts are so well-placed within the story as to be downright sneaky in their role of carrying heavy loads with few words. They keep the pace lively.

The letters also do yeoman's work in breathing life into those characters who, while not cast in starring roles like the two diarists, are nevertheless vital to the story.

Hannah Iredell comes to the reader already molded, set, and unlikely to change. I had no wish for her to become different. She is not a beauty; she knows that. Her husband James betrayed her once to her knowledge, and she accepts the likelihood that he did so at other times as well, perhaps many. She lost a child. She has another who is (probably) schizophrenic. Someone else's child was lost while in her care. She endures hardship and loneliness so acute I felt it down inside my bones. In spite of all that, Hannah Iredell does not succumb to feeling sorry for herself. She soldiers on. She uses her intelligence to remain a steady force through troubled times.

Then along comes the other Hannah, a green bud straining to open--quite pretty, somewhat flirtatious, restless to enter a wondrous future, impressed by the wrong things, and eminently lovable for all of that. What a delight to see this child still in her teens evolve into the principal catalyst for effecting change in a character as rock-solid as Hannah Iredell. When adversity comes young Hannah Gray Wilson's way, as it does in torrents, she reaches into her soul and draws forth all the courage she has, and then some.

Even Hannah Iredell, older and as courageous and rock-solid as she herself is, cannot help but be moved--and changed--by the courage shown by Hannah Wilson. I believe the development of these two characters, as their stars cross during these crucial, formative years in American history, is the foundation of this captivating story. It gives me pride to recommend this wonderful book with five stars.
E-Books Related to A More Obedient Wife: A Novel of the Early Supreme Court: