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Tango Briefing ePub download

by Adam Hall

  • Author: Adam Hall
  • ISBN: 0002215675
  • ISBN13: 978-0002215671
  • ePub: 1969 kb | FB2: 1924 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Thrillers & Suspense
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Distribution Services; 1St Edition edition (August 1973)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 457
  • Format: mbr rtf azw lrf
Tango Briefing ePub download

Читать онлайн - Hall Adam. The Tango Briefing Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн The Tango Briefing.

Читать онлайн - Hall Adam. Adam Hall The Tango Briefing 1: BIRDSEYE I came in over the Pole and we were stacked up for nearly twenty minutes in a holding circuit round London before they could find us a runway and then we had to wait for a bottleneck on the ground to get itself sorted out and all we could do was stare through the windows at the downpour and that didn't help.

Maybe they thought his sleepy-eyed approach to the thing would calm us down.

I came in over the Pole and we were stacked up for nearly twenty minutes in a holding circuit round London before they could find us a runway and then we had to wait for a bottleneck on the ground to get itself sorted out and all we could do was stare through the windows at the downpour and that didn’t help. Maybe they thought his sleepy-eyed approach to the thing would calm us down. It was driving me up the wall.

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Book's title: The tango briefing. Library of Congress Control Number: 74150241. Physical Description: 277 p. Download now The tango briefing: Download PDF book format. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0002216675. Download DOC book format.

Quiller, the Bureau's top intelligence agent, faces the toughest assignment of his career-a job that takes him to the Sahara Desert to locate a downed plane

One of the Best Entries in a Vastly Overlooked Series. com User, January 9, 2005. The Tango Briefing" is certainly the fastest-paced, most entertaining Quiller adventure I've read so far. Elleston Trevor (using pseudonym "Adam Hall") reuses the same basic premise of his classic "Flight of the Phoenix" - a plane crashes in the desert - and adapts it remarkably well for his world-weary "ferret" Quiller.

Written by Adam Hall, narrated by Antony Ferguson. Quiller, Book 5. By: Adam Hall. Narrated by: Antony Ferguson. Series: Quiller, Book 5. Length: 7 hrs and 58 mins. Categories: Crime & Thrillers, Espionage.

His assignment: find and destroy a mysterious downed aircraft before the world learns of its existence, before its cargo is disclosed, and before enemy agents destroy the plane and possibly Quiller along with it!

Quiller, the Bureau's top intelligence agent, faces the toughest assignment of his career--a job that takes him to the Sahara Desert to locate a downed plane, photograph its crew, and identify its cargo. Reprint.
Enalonasa
Just about everything is right here. The plot is credible as are the twists and turns. The characters are well-formed. The defining elements of Quiller novel - the first-person narrative explaining actions and decisions and the requirement for the reader to fill in the gaps - have now been developed to their peak condition. If I had to find a complaint, it is that Quiller's language skills perhaps defy credibility. One would expect a secret agent working in foreign countries to have significant language skills, but in the first five novels he has shown himself to be fluent in German, Thai, Russian, Polish and Arabic. This might work if he had been selected for these missions because of his language skills. But the novels make clear that The Bureau has a limited pool of agents and that Quiller was selected for these missions for skills unrelated to language. But this is a minor quibble. Several other reviewers rate this as their favourite Quiller and it is certainly one of my favourites.
Djang
A recon flight returns pictures of something in the Algerian desert that might be an airplane. Because its suspected cargo would be dangerous in the wrong hands, Quiller is dispatched to "take a close look at the bloody thing." And bloody is just what he gets, as one would expect from a Quiller novel. He also battles dehydration, exhaustion, and the constant threat of death as he shakes off surveillance, dodges bullets, and parachutes into the desert where vultures are hoping to have him for lunch.

Quiller is a fun character. Of all the fictional spies, Quiller is probably the least likable -- and that's what makes him so easy to like. He's testy, quarrelsome, disgruntled, a loner who loathes everyone, particularly his bosses. Most of the time he behaves like a jerk, but he gets the job done. Quiller survives by relying upon his intellect, a sharp mind that is constantly at war with his instinct and the demands/fears of a body he refers to as "the organism." If often seems as if Quiller wishes he weren't burdened with frail limbs and human emotions, that he would be happier as an analytical robot.

I love the refined-but-tough first-person prose Adam Hall uses to narrate Quiller's story. His surging sentences are perfectly timed, reflecting the anxiety and restlessness of a spy waiting for the action to start. And once it starts, it's unrelenting. Action scenes are intense, particularly those that take place in the desert. They left me feeling parched. The Quiller novels aren't in the same class as the best spy fiction, but they're smart, gripping, and thoroughly entertaining. This is one of the better ones.
Bladecliff
Quiller is sent to the Sahara desert to do his ferret thing with a downed aircraft. The opposition -- both human and elemental -- is fierce, and his local support is a bit green even if the director is first rate. I'll leave it you to discover some of the great surprises that Mr. Hall (a pseudonym) has in store.

Mr. Hall has some writing tricks that are common to the Quiller series but not often found elsewhere. He intentionally disorients the reader by skipping ahead to the action, and then letting the explanation catch up. But most interesting is his "voice", which is Quiller's apparently internal dialogue as he proceeds. He can analyse in great detail, presumably far more quickly than it takes to read, and he struggles with his own frustrations (usually with London), fears, and doubts. To an extent that surpasses most popular fiction, Mr. Hall puts the reader into the head of his character, and he does it without one noticing the trick.

The missions themselves are usually quite interesting; this one is unusual and very gripping. But the immersive techniques of Mr. Hall put the Quiller series at the very top of the genre. I am on my second journey through the series, and am enjoying it as much if not more than I did decades ago.
Defolosk
Beginning with a dull and annoying eye test, ending with a mix of sun and shade hardly easier for the 'shadow executive' to process, The Tango Briefing is the most internal of Hall's Quiller tales.

That is saying something indeed, since all of the novels are written in a first-person narrative that is painstakingly detailed whether it is during the fifth minute of a lonely car pursuit on a midnight roadway, steeply banked, across the Algerian Sahara...or the fifth second-- counting down now--before head-on impact at 140 mph after he has turned his car to play chicken with the same pursuer.

While the possibility of screen time for Hall's hero seems remote--other excellent reviews seem to agree--if there is a candidate among Hall's stories for a Pinter-esque adaptation for the post-modern stage--allowing for a gas tank explosion and a larger one, of course, at the end--it is The Tango Briefing: Man/woman alone, pursuing odd goals through this sometimes-unimaginably nightmarish wasteland redeemed only, perhaps, by common decency (here, esp. Quiller's, regarding the young female aide's future career path, and his director's regarding his final voice communication to his agent), only explained, perhaps, by a "sense of duty".

(P.S. Bleak and yet. There is nothing existential about Quiller's admiration for those he elsewhere describes as caring, committed, and competent...especially competent. So how about let's cure the big C already and stop talking about doing it.)
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