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Hit and Run ePub download

by Lawrence Block

  • Author: Lawrence Block
  • ISBN: 0752893602
  • ISBN13: 978-0752893600
  • ePub: 1243 kb | FB2: 1970 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Thrillers & Suspense
  • Publisher: Unknown (2009)
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 568
  • Format: azw lrf rtf mbr
Hit and Run ePub download

Part of Keller series by Lawrence Block. I had to book three nights because I couldn’t go through all that song and dance about how only two-oh-four would do, not if I was only going to keep the room for a single night.

Part of Keller series by Lawrence Block. That was the trouble with stamp collecting. You never ran out of things to want. If he’d collected something else - rocks, say, or old Victrolas, or art -. he’d run out of room sooner or later. With stamps, though, he had a set of ten large albums, occupying no more than five running feet of bookshelf space, and he could collect for the rest of his life and spend millions of dollars and never fill them. How many knew him from the building, or had run into him at the deli, or at the gym, or anywhere in that unassuming life he’d been idealizing just minutes ago? That life to which he could never return. He went through the paper again, more carefully this time, and in a story he’d skimmed earlier he found evidence that at least one of Keller’s neighbors had noticed his resemblance to the furtive chap in the photograph.

Lawrence Block (born June 24, 1938) is an American crime writer best known for two long-running New York–set series about the recovering alcoholic . Matthew Scudder and the gentleman burglar Bernie Rhodenbarr

Lawrence Block (born June 24, 1938) is an American crime writer best known for two long-running New York–set series about the recovering alcoholic . Matthew Scudder and the gentleman burglar Bernie Rhodenbarr. Block was named a Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America in 1994. Lawrence Block was born June 24, 1938 in Buffalo, New York, where he was raised. Block attended Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, but left before graduating.

HIT AND RUN (New York, 2008)-a novel about Keller, a killer-for-hire-is far from Lawrence Block's best work

HIT AND RUN (New York, 2008)-a novel about Keller, a killer-for-hire-is far from Lawrence Block's best work. One piece of good news is it's really a novel, unlike HIT PARADE (2006), Block's previous Keller book (a collection of 8 short stories and 1 novelette that was falsely marketed as a novel for financial reasons-novels usually sell far more copies than do collections). I had recommended 2 of his short stories about Keller to at least a dozen friends

Lawrence Block brings back John Keller in "Hit and Ru. Keller is a hit man on assignment. He's picked up at the airport by his contact and given two guns to choose from for his hit.

Lawrence Block brings back John Keller in "Hit and Ru.

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. The Burglar Who liked to Quote Kipling. The Burglar Who Painted Like Mondrian. Out on the Cutting Edge. Lawrence Block,Jill Emerson. Getting Off: A Novel of Sex & Violence. On the bookshelvesAll.

Hit and Run. A John Keller Mystery.

Author: Lawrence Block. Publication date: 2008. Annotation. Author: Lawrence Block. Keller’s a hit man. For years now he’s had places to go and people to kill. But enough is enough. He’s got money in the bank and just one last job standing between him and retirement. So he carries it out with his usual professionalism, and he heads home, and guess what? One more job. Paid in advance, so what’s he going to do?

Hit and Run The fourth book in the Keller series By Lawrence Block 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19. .

Hit and Run The fourth book in the Keller series By Lawrence Block 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 Acknowledgments About the Author. LAWRENCE BLOCK is one of the most widely recognized names in the mystery genre. He is a prolific author, having written more than fifty books and numerous short stories, and is a devoted New Yorker and an enthusiastic global traveler.

Fearlessdweller
HIT AND RUN (New York, 2008)—a novel about Keller, a killer-for-hire—is far from Lawrence Block's best work. One piece of good news is it's really a novel, unlike HIT PARADE (2006), Block's previous Keller book (a collection of 8 short stories and 1 novelette that was falsely marketed as a novel for financial reasons—novels usually sell far more copies than do collections).

Until I read HIT PARADE, Block had been my favorite living crime fiction author. I had recommended 2 of his short stories about Keller to at least a dozen friends. In HIT PARADE, Keller came across as far smaller, both mentally and morally, than he'd been in most of Block's stories about him which I'd read previously. A second bit of good news about the novel HIT AND RUN is that, to some extent, Keller "regrows" morally after hearing a pretty woman's cry for help in a New Orleans park a night.

The A-to-Z plot of HIT AND RUN involves Keller's being framed for the assassination of a politician (which totally overturns his life and that of Dot, his friend and handler) and the revenge Keller and Dot seek against their powerful and dangerous enemy.

The weaknesses of HIT AN RUN are at least fourfold: (1) we learn that Dot has recently done 2 despicable acts, and these seriously undercut the good feelings readers are likely to have about Keller's slight moral regeneration; (2) many of the scenes are "corny," "trite," "sentimental," "slack," and/or "unbelievably lucky"; (3) the novel as a whole, which is 287 pages long, often seems to be padded out; (4) the final face-to-face confrontation between Keller and the millionaire who had him framed is "rushed," "underdone," and very unsatisfying.

In my judgment, HIT AND RUN deserves a "C+" grade at most (3 stars). While making this judgment, I was NOT comparing Block's book with world-class grade-"A" books by Dante, Melville, Tolstoy, and Faulkner. Instead, and more appropriately, I compared it with crime novels I greatly admire. HIT AND RUN most resembles Geoffrey Household's man-on-the-run novel ROGUE MALE (1939), which I rate worth a "B+". Crime fiction that I rate as deserving "A" grades includes Grant Allen's AN AFRICAN MILLIONAIRE (1897), Eden Phillpotts' THE RED REDMAYNES (1922), Philip MacDonald's THE RASP (1924), Arthur Upfield's MR. JELLY'S BUSINESS (1937; aka MURDER DOWN UNDER) and THE BACHELORS OF BROKEN HILL (1950), Robert Van Gulik's THE CHINESE NAIL MURDERS (1961), and Rex Stout's GAMBIT (1962). Block's novel HIT AND RUN comes nowhere close to the fine qualities of any of these works, but it is better than the "D"-grade work of Hugh Pentecost's DEATH AFTER BREAKFAST (1978), Robert B. Parker's aptly titled BAD BUSINESS (2004), and Peter Turnbull's FALSE KNIGHT (2006).

POSTSCRIPT: In case anyone wishes to read FAR better stories about Block's hit man, try "Keller's Therapy" (PLAYBOY, May 1993; awarded an EDGAR in 1994), "Keller's Karma" (PLAYBOY, Feb. 1995), and "Keller on the Spot" (PLAYBOY, Nov. 1997; awarded an EDGAR in 1998), at least 2 of which are available in several "Best of" anthologies. In these stories, Keller basically comes across as a deeply thoughtful and genuinely moral person who takes his profession seriously.
Dianaghma
Lawrence Block was a successful writer many years before I became aware of him, so what I have to say is going to have zero effect on his reputation. I'm aiming this at a reader who is just starting to make his acquaintance and is wondering if it is worth the effort.

It certainly is, and this effort provides a good sampler of his talents. First, his hero, known only as Keller, is a highly skilled killer-for-hire who always gets away with it. We are thus already in an alternate universe. He leads a quiet, normal life, and collects stamps for a hobby. He has a administrator/sidekick, Dot, who "runs" him and acts as a confidante and balance wheel.

This outing demonstrates Mr. Block's talents as a master of the twisted plot. Keller is routinely engaged to eliminate an obscure businessman for an obscure reason, but as he is preparing to do so, someone assassinates the Governor of Ohio. Far worse, the plotters intentionally steer suspicion toward a man who looks very much like Keller and play his picture on every television in the state. Keller is suddenly a highly visible fugitive, a completely new experience for him. He is virtually without resources, having just spent his trip money on a tempting set of stamps, and he completely loses contact with Dot. The rest of the tale tells of his efforts, over months, not only to evade capture but find out why he was entangled in the first place.

Everything works out, but the suspense is delicious. Read, and join the choir. Five stars.
Ynonno
I read the previous Keller books in order and liked this one best. I normally like police procedurals but the Keller series is a nice change of pace. Of course you can't look too deeply at the psychology of the killer Keller, for he's a schizo mix of cold blooded and normal, even warm hearted now and then. I truly could do without the extensive descriptions and intricacies of stamp collecting. But I like the witty dialog and the wordsmithing. I must admit I find the new character Julia not believable.
All in all a good read, if you gloss over most parts describing the stamp collecting......unless you're a collector.
Qudanilyr
I like this book and the series. This entry is marred by the author's apparent animus toward Ann Coulter and Ayn Rand. Block uses his godlike fictive powers to impugn one of Keller's victims--a man who had the misfortune of recognizing Keller's mug shot on the television and so "had it coming" after pulling a gun on Keller in expectation of turning him over to the authorities. After Keller dispatches him, we learn that the murdered man owned an Ann Coulter inflatable sex doll and a few Ayn Rand novels. These two items are proffered as evidence of the man's weirdo right-wing redneckiness.
Thordira
A bottom feeder, I've been reading a bunch of the $1.99 and 99-cent offerings on Kindle. Because I very much like Block's books and the Keller series in particular, I splurged on this book and was reminded why authors like Block are best sellers. Block has mastered a wonderfully conversational tone in his writing - a mix of thoughtful reflection and cutting irony that holds my attention throughout. The plots are always lively and take twists that are unexpected or logical but always interesting. A stamp collector and thoughtful observer of the passing scene, Keller seems perfectly reasonable until he snaps a neck or shoots a contract in the head.

Unlike most contemporary writers, Block uses violence sparingly - many of Keller's hits occur "off camera." But when Block does indulge, it serves as a reminder that despite his gentle nature and generic demeanor, Keller is a contract killer.

And maybe it's just me, but Block has some truly wonderful and thoughtful reflections on life and death, marriage and family, America and Americans - no doubt the bonus that comes with living a reasonably long life.

I do hope that Keller isn't permanently retired.