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Greenmantle ePub download

by John Buchan

  • Author: John Buchan
  • ISBN: 1846373662
  • ISBN13: 978-1846373664
  • ePub: 1933 kb | FB2: 1973 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Thrillers & Suspense
  • Publisher: Echo Library (May 15, 2006)
  • Pages: 524
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 712
  • Format: mbr mobi docx txt
Greenmantle ePub download

Greenmantle is the second of five novels by John Buchan featuring the character of Richard Hannay, first published in 1916 by Hodder & Stoughton, London.

Greenmantle is the second of five novels by John Buchan featuring the character of Richard Hannay, first published in 1916 by Hodder & Stoughton, London. It is one of two Hannay novels set during the First World War, the other being Mr Standfast (1919); Hannay's first and best-known adventure, The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915), is set in the period immediately preceding the war.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Hannay is called in to investigate rumours of an uprising in the Muslim world, and undertakes a perilous journey through enemy territory to meet his friend Sandy in Constantinople.

LibriVox recording of Greenmantle, by John Buchan For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox. Download M4B Part 1 (127MB) Download M4B Part 2 (125MB).

LibriVox recording of Greenmantle, by John Buchan. Greenmantle is the second of five Richard Hannay novels by John Buchan, first published in 1916 by Hodder & Stoughton, London. It is one of two Hannay novels set during the First World War, the other being Mr Standfast (1919); Hannay's first and best-known adventure, The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915), is set in the period immediately before the war started. For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.

John Buchan is such a classic writer, and a this a novel of its time.

It is November, 1915. John Buchan is such a classic writer, and a this a novel of its time. Be aware - this book used to terms to discribe different races that we find offensive, but it was written in the period after the war, when different values applied. In this adventure, Richard is seconded to become a spy.

Greenmantle by John Buchan (1875 - 1940). The audio is the records of Librivox.

The audio is the records of Librivox.

This book is set during World War I, not II. It is a great read. I've read criticisms of Buchan due to racism and being a minority I did not perceive any such notion. If you're into adventure stories this short series of books are great.

You can also read the full text online using our ereader. This book is set during World War I, not II. Buchan's keeps the books interesting adding interest with excitement and humor. Richard Hannay is sometimes a little pretentious, but I enjoyed his sense of honor, dignity and compassion.

Read Greenmantle, by John Buchan online on Bookmate – A classic espionage and adventure novel set during The Great War, featuring the reckless Richard Hannay. Tasked with unraveling a mysterious mes. A classic espionage and adventure novel set during The Great War, featuring the reckless Richard Hannay. Sequel to The Thirty-Nine Steps and precursor to Mr. Standfast.

This large print title is set in Tieras 16pt font as reccomended by the RNIB.
Lanin
I love the unapologetic attitude of our narrator in these early spy genre entries. Just about every nationality and religion can find an offending slur, but hey, it was a century ago - and it's teachable.

But what I wasn't ready for was learning to what degree Islam and the Moslem world played in The Great War. That is, after all, the premise of this yarn. Oh, all the other players are here, too - but this is the "Near East" and so the role of the Moslems, with heavy emphasis on German manipulation, make this a fascinating period yarn.

Happily, no one thought to sanitize this for 21st Century sensibilities and it's a keen look into the Empire and Imperialistic period of several monarchies.
Nalmezar
I read the Kindle Version.

This is a book for someone who likes page-turning adventure, but cringes at the 21st Century idea that the genre needs graphic violence, gratuitous sex and use of the f-bomb to entertain. Yes, there is violence (it is a WW1 novel, after all). And there are a few uses of mild vugarities, as well as ethnic references that offend modern, thin-skinned people looking for any reason to be offended. If you are one of those, read something else. But if "clean" (by modern standards) literature with a Judeo-Christian background suits your preference, get this book. It is the second in the Richard Hannay series, taking up where "The 39 Steps" leaves off.

Overall, a great, easy read with many historical and cultural references to life in a war zone a century ago. The characters are realistic, though some of the ways they get out of trouble seem miraculous. The setting is vivdly described with detailed descriptions. One almost feels the cold as the main character escapes German soldiers in a cold, snowy region. Or imagines climbing mountains in Turkey leading to the climax.
MisterMax
While holidaying in Bali recently, I needed a book suitable for reading by the pool. Something simple; a getaway type of book that was not too taxing. I settled upon “Greenmantle” having previously read “The Thirty Nine Steps” a couple of times many years ago.

In essence, “Greenmantle” is a sequel to “The Thirty Nine Steps”. It is a boys’ own type of adventure thriller written early last century and set during the First World War. It covers the exploits of Richard Hannay as he aims to unravel a mystery in present day Turkey. He has a small team of supporters who manage to cross enemy lines from Britain before gathering in Constantinople. Here, they have many close shaves before stumbling upon critical military intelligence that would be useful to the Russians as they faced the Ottomans.

While the book is a fun read, it could never be described as great literature. The language is also very dated and the racial stereotypes jar on the modern ear. Nonetheless, for a book to read by the edge of the pool in the sun it is more than adequate. Indeed, Richard Hannay could be best be described as an early version of James Bond. In other words, all good fun but not to be taken too seriously.
Dusar
A perfect period piece and follow-up to The 39 Steps. Richard Hannay is the literary ancestor of all later secret agents. Cynicism hadn't set in yet. This time, his mission is to the mysterious East. Hannay and his accomplices are on a desperate mission to prevent all of Islam from siding with Germany in the First World War.

The sentiments seem quaint and dated by the lights of our time, but courage, wit, and sacrifice still have their uses. This is the way the British like to see themselves, and it got them through two desperate wars, so we might do well not to sneer.

And, if you like mysteries, it's a cracking good read. Pretend you are still young and hopeful of a better world as you read it.
Milleynti
This is the second volume about the James Bond of World War I and takes place mainly in Germany and Turkey. The plot is somewhat improbable but John Buchan did it again - it is very readable and quite exciting. It was written shortly after WWI and its descriptions of life in Germany are remarkable in its balanced nature and an often admiring tone when describing the Turkish Army. The book is definitely not pc by today's standards, albeit with non-pc bits offensive to both majorities and minorities. The author underplays the horrors of trench warfare and may have played the stiff upper lip approach too far even by the standards of his day.
For Buchan aficionados this book probably rates five stars, I gave it four because it is too slow for younger readers and/or those not familiar with the Great Britain of the early XX Century.
Glei
I had just finished reading Peter Hopkirk's "On Secret Service East of Constantinople; The Plot to Bring Down the British Empire." That was a historical thriller--actually a page-turner work of history. And that turned me on to "Greenmantle" due to Hopkirk's several references to the novel, as a work of fiction closely based on the battle of Erzerum in which British spies--in the novel, Richard Hannay and Sandy Arbuthnot--smuggle secret maps to the Russians, who thus destroy the city and German hopes for an eastern empire. And according to a letter smuggled out of Russia, the Tsar and his family were reading Greenmantle while imprisoned and shortly before their execution by the Bolsheviks. These accounts made me want to read Greenmantle itself, published in 1916.

I have to say, it was thrilling. . . I read it in 24 hours. Alfred Hitchcock wanted to make it into a movie, and it's a shame he didn't, but the Buchan family wanted too much for the rights. It's now available on Kindle (who could imagine?) and in print once again. It helped to have just finished Hopkirk, so I had better historical background for the book than I could have got from Greenmantle itself, at a 97-year remove from those events.
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