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Frequent Hearses ePub download

by Edmund Crispin

  • Author: Edmund Crispin
  • ISBN: 0140063250
  • ISBN13: 978-0140063257
  • ePub: 1942 kb | FB2: 1157 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Mystery
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; First Edition edition (November 18, 1982)
  • Pages: 224
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 423
  • Format: azw docx rtf txt
Frequent Hearses ePub download

Frequent Hearses Edmund Crispin On all the line a sudden vengeance waits, And frequent hearses shall besiege your gates. Welcome to Literature Tube Archieve The free online library containing 500000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

Frequent Hearses Edmund Crispin On all the line a sudden vengeance waits, And frequent hearses shall besiege your gates.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. 307 Kb. Fen Country: 26 Stories (Classic Crime). 191 Kb. El caso de la mosca dorada.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Oxford don Gervase Fen is at the film studios to advise about a film biography of Alexander Pope, when he learns of Gloria's death. She appears to have little reason for wanting to kill herself. But when a cameraman is poisoned before his eyes.

Bruce Montgomery/Edmund Crispin: A Life in Music and Books. Aldershot: Ashgate, p. 4. ^ John Bowen in The Oldie, April 2011.

Frequent Hearses (1950) (published in the United States as Sudden Vengeance). The Long Divorce (1951) (published in the United States as A Noose for Her). The Glimpses of the Moon (1977). Bruce Montgomery/Edmund Crispin: A Life in Music and Books.

But as a reader I cherish the works of oddball writers like Edmund Crispin who wrote nine mysteries and two books of short stories and left this world leaving his fans pining for more

But as a reader I cherish the works of oddball writers like Edmund Crispin who wrote nine mysteries and two books of short stories and left this world leaving his fans pining for more. Crispin's books are well written and full of eccentric characters and they give fascinating glimpses into whatever professional world he choose as a setting. Here it's the British film industry immediately after WWII. The author knew his way around that one because he was a long-time composer of film music.

Edmund Crispin ll moral and cultural values. But on this fateful Monday it was on his desk by five past three, carried there by a sergeant with the air of those heralds in Greek tragedy who convey calamitous and often barely credible news to choruses of aghast and wondering citizens.

Frequent Hearses - Edmund Crispin. After the first few over-wrought pages, Frequent Hearses is more sombre, intelligent, and entertaining than Crispin often managed. The mystery and its conclusion are less satisfying than the book's individual pages; but for reading pleasure beyond mere plot, this is a good one. cmbohnGo to cmbohn's profile.

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First published in 1950, Frequent Hearses was Edmund Crispin's seventh novel. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. Thriller & Crime Historical Detectives Cosy Mysteries.

Oxford don Gervase Fen is at the film studios to advise about a film biography of Alexander Pope, when he learns of Gloria's death. She appears to have little reason for wanting to kill herself. But when a cameraman is poisoned before his eyes, Fen finds himself involved in murder.
Awene
Gervase Fen, Oxford don, has been hired by a film studio as a literary advisor on a film about Alexander Pope. Fen is doubtful that Pope’s life is movie material, but the producer is a “literary crank” with his own kooky ideas about Pope. Despite the freewheeling freedom from facts in the studios, Fen rather enjoys being there.

Edmund Crispin was a composer as well as a writer, and produced a lot of sound tracks for films. So we can assume his descriptions of the studios in the fifties are authentic.

The story opens with the dramatic suicide of a teenaged actress of no great importance. But when a celebrity is murdered, the plot thickens. Fen gets involved because he’s friendly with the Scotland Yard man investigating —Inspector Humbleby. The police are obviously excited to be meeting the stars.

There are lots of characters to keep track of, which seems a bit unfair in a fair play mystery. But a young woman in the music department turns out to be unexpectedly heroic. Her great misadventure gives Crispin the opportunity to write a gripping suspense scene.

The narrative is spiced with obtuse literary allusions, as is usual with the Gervase Fen mysteries. Even the title comes from Alexander Pope. This is fun, even if (like me) you haven’t read much Pope (and never willingly).

I found the descriptions of studio architecture a bit tedious, but other than that I enjoyed Frequent Hearses. It was first published in 1950, so it has period interest, as well as well as being a good whodunit, written in a charming style.
Gralinda
If I had to rank my favorite British mystery authors who produced their best work in the 1930s through the 1950s, my list would look like this:

(1) Edmund Crispin a.k.a. Bruce Montgomery
(2) Michael Innes a.k.a. John Innes Mackintosh Stewart
(3) Dorothy Sayers
(4) Margery Allingham
(5) Michael Innes a.k.a. John Innes Mackintosh Stewart (with a drop in rank for his mysteries that went off the surreal deep-end).

Out of my Fab Four Brits, Michael Innes and Edmund Crispin share the most similarities. They were both of Scots-Irish background, both wrote their mysteries under pseudonyms while teaching at college, and both were educated at Oxford -- Oriel College and St. John’s College, respectively. They both wrote highly literate mysteries with frequent allusions to the classics (nine out of ten of which go zooming right over my head). Michael Innes has his detective, Sir John Appleby poke fun at this high-brow type of murder fiction in “Death at the Chase”:

“That's why detective stories are of no interest to policemen. Their villains remain far too consistently cerebral.”

Expect that even the most vicious murderer in an Edmund Crispin mystery will quote Dryden or Shakespeare at the drop of a garrote. “Frequent Hearses” is a fertile setting for this type of classical badinage, since its plot involves the making of a film based on the biography of Alexander Pope. Gervase Fen, Oxford don of English Language and Literature, and amateur detective extraordinaire is hired by the film company as a story consultant, and he is plagued throughout the book by a Scotland Yard detective who is an amateur classics scholar. Fen wants to discuss the murder. Chief Inspector Humbleby wants to talk about the Brontes and Dr. Johnson. Neither one will admit to a less than perfect understanding of either his profession or his hobby, and both despise amateurs. Their encounters keep “Frequent Hearses” sparkling along right up until its final page. Here is a sample of dialogue, wherein Inspector Humbleby deliberately misunderstands Fen’s explanation of the film’s subject:

“Based,” Fen reiterated irritably, “on the life of Pope.”
“The Pope?”
“Pope.”
“Now which Pope would that be, I wonder?” said Humbleby, with the air of one who tries to take an intelligent interest in what is going forward. “Pius, or Clement, or--“
Fen stared at him. “Alexander, of course.”
“You mean”---Humbleby spoke with something of an effort---“you mean the Borgia?”

All of Crispin’s characters are carefully (one might say ‘crisply’) developed, and distinguished for the reader by a quirk or eccentric manner of speech (sometimes Crispin overplays the eccentricity at the expense of realism, especially with his main protagonist-- I do wish Fen would stop expostulating, “Oh, my fur and whiskers!”). Physical description is sketchy. If one of Crispin’s characters walked past you in the street, you probably wouldn’t recognize him. However, if you were to overhear his conversation with the postman---

And I don’t mean to imply that “Frequent Hearses” is all dialogue and no action. There is one especially harrowing scene where a young woman chases the murderer into a maze in order to learn his identity and then (when reason returns) can’t find her way back out again. By the time Fen rescues her, she has endured an experience right out of an M.R. James horror story (in fact, the young woman quotes M.R. James at length while she is traversing the maze – a typical Crispin characteristic).

The mystery surrounding the murderer’s identity and motivation is as cleverly convoluted as the maze, and it is equally as hard to get to its heart. Crispin himself wrote and published at least one film script and composed music for several films, so “Frequent Hearses” is told with the knowledge of a movie industry insider.

If you like vintage British mysteries with a ‘classical education’ and haven’t yet discovered the ‘Professor Fen’ novels, then you’re in for a treat-- assuming you can find these out-of-print volumes. Here are all nine of the Fen mysteries plus two collections of short stories, in case you jump into ‘Frequent Hearses’ and want to keep going:

“The Case of the Gilded Fly” (“Obsequies at Oxford”), 1944;
“Holy Disorders”, 1945;
“The Moving Toyshop”, 1946;
“Swan Song” (“Dead and Dumb”), 1947;
“Love Lies Bleeding”, 1948;
“Buried for Pleasure”, 1948;
“Frequent Hearses”, 1950;
“The Long Divorce”, 1952;
“Beware of the Trains”, 1953 (short stories);
“The Glimpses of the Moon”, 1978;
“Fen Country”, 1979 (short stories).
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