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Hush Money ePub download

by Max Allan Collins

  • Author: Max Allan Collins
  • ISBN: 1935797247
  • ISBN13: 978-1935797241
  • ePub: 1604 kb | FB2: 1288 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Mystery
  • Publisher: Perfect Crime Books (April 29, 2012)
  • Pages: 180
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 172
  • Format: mobi mbr lrf lit
Hush Money ePub download

Back in 2013, I started reading Max Allan Collins and his Nolan series, though I got side-tracked after about 3 books.

Back in 2013, I started reading Max Allan Collins and his Nolan series, though I got side-tracked after about 3 books. Hush Money is the fourth in the series. Best book ever? No, but I enjoyed it.

Books by Max Allan Collins Nolan Novels FLY PAPER HARD CASH SCRATCH FEVER HUSH MONEY MOURN THE LIVING SPREE Quarry Novels QUARRY QUARRY’S LIST QUARRY’S. Books by Max Allan Collins.

Max Allan Collins (born March 3, 1948) is an American mystery writer. His work has been published in several formats and his Road to Perdition series was the basis for a film of the same name

Max Allan Collins (born March 3, 1948) is an American mystery writer. His work has been published in several formats and his Road to Perdition series was the basis for a film of the same name. He wrote the Dick Tracy newspaper strip for many years and has produced numerous novels featuring the character as well. Collins has written novels, screenplays, comic books, comic strips, trading cards, short stories, movie novelizations and historical fiction.

The two men were riding in a red and mostly white golf cart that was putt-putting across the brown grass toward the first tee of the back nine.

The two men were riding in a red and mostly white golf cart that was putt-putting across the brown grass toward the first tee of the back nine ew his intestines and much of his spine and a good deal of blood out of the back of him. But that would not happen immediately. The man in the assassin’s crosshairs had almost five minutes to live.

Max Allan Collins's hard-boiled Nolan crime novels, steeped in Vietnam-era cynicism, are back in print with new Introductions by the author. Back in 2013, I started reading Max Allan Collins and his Nolan series, though I got side-tracked after about 3 books. Best book e Synopsis/blur. .Someone is targeting crooked businessmen for death, and the Chicago Family turns to Nolan for help.

Majorly, in this book, max Collins concentrates in showing us all sorts of unpleasant killings and assassinations.

Hardcover Paperback Kindle. Max Collins has also written comic books, screen plays, short stories and movie novelizations that have garnered the favor of many people globally. The book series are being updated up to now and they are becoming more famous as days pass by. Let’s focus on the Quarry series which contains the earliest books of this writer. Majorly, in this book, max Collins concentrates in showing us all sorts of unpleasant killings and assassinations. The most astonishing part of the story is that Quarry takes other human beings as foolish people who otherwise don’t deserve to live. This is contrary to what we should expect of him.

Nate Heller returns home from duty in Guadalcanal a decorated, damaged, and dangerous hero-and drops directly from one war into another: the gangland coup to topple Frank Nitti as he tries to strong-arm the Hollywood unions. A Q&A with Max Allan Collins. Question: Chicago Lightning is a story collection about private detective Nate Heller. It's a rich collection, yet the stories number only 13-meaning that since 1984 (when the first Heller book, True Detective, came out), you've published only one short story for every novel. Max Allan Collins: That wasn't intentional. I'm not a prolific short-story writer.

New York Times bestselling author of Road to Perdition, Quarry,.

New York Times bestselling author of Road to Perdition, Quarry, Nathan Heller, and more.

Someone is targeting crooked businessmen for death, and the Chicago Family turns to Nolan for help. Max Allan Collins's hard-boiled Nolan crime novels, steeped in Vietnam-era cynicism, are back in print with new Introductions by the author.
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“Hush Money” continues the story of Nolan and his buddy Jon from where the story left off in “Fly Paper.” It is not necessary to read the stories in order, but the author has indicated that the stories do fit together in one long saga.

Nolan is an ex-mafia guy who, after having his differences with members of the family, went off on his own for some years, getting involved in heists and robberies, well-planned, well-executed heists for that matter. Nolan was considered the best in the business and had never ended up behind bars.

Jon is about as unlikely a guy to be paired with as Nolan could imagine, but their sometimes-partnership works well. Jon’s uncle was known as “The Planner” and, under the cover of being an antiques dealer, the Planner would case jobs and put together packages for jobs consisting of plans and contacts. That is, he did this prior to getting killed when some thieves broke into his antiques shop and stole the $800,000 that Nolan and Jon had reaped from their first job together.

Jon is a twenty-one year old baby-faced kid with little experience in the life. He collects comic books with a passion few could imagine and has as his life’s dream becoming a comic book artist. He hoped that his first job with Nolan would finance his way to pursuing his life’s dream, but it didn’t quite work out that way. Jon has looked up to Nolan as the personification of his action hero fantasies.

When this part of the story begins, Nolan and Jon are sort of retired from the life. Nolan is managing a motel for the Outfit. “He had his freedom again, with no one in particular trying to kill him, but it was an empty freedom. He was on a desert island with Raquel Welch and he couldn’t get it up.”

This volume (“Hush Money”) is a Nolan/Jon tale, but it also features quite strongly a host of other characters, including the DiPreta brothers, Joey, Vince, and Frank, a family with many interests in Des Moines, including a construction company, discount stores, and other businesses of a more questionable nature. The Dipreta fortune was originally tied to bootlegging, protection, and loansharking. They were rumoured to be a mafia-style crime family, but, although connected to the Chicago Outfit, were not necessarily a part of the Outfit. Vincent had been known as Vincent the Burner in his earlier days, specializing in arson insurance scams. He “had been a handsome fat man, a round, jovial, eminently likeable man,” but now the years had not been kind to Vincent and his “flesh hung on him like a droopy suit, loose and stretched from years of carrying all that weight around.” Joey was the youngest of the brothers, an amateur golfer, and man about town. Frank was the only one of the brothers to still carry heat.

Someone has declared war on the DiPreta brothers and not in a nice, gentle way either and Nolan and Jon walk into the middle of this war. Jon, in particular, has little idea of what is going on, except that Frank DiPreta’s eighteen-year-old platinum blonde daughter is the answer to all his adolescent fantasies.

While this volume in the story does not focus as tightly on Nolan and Jon as other books in series, it is a great read because of all the other characters who are more tightly developed here. The story moves quite swiftly. It contains all the gritty elements of other Nolan books and Nolan’s terrific sense of humor in the face of even the craziest situation.

Highly recommended.
Bil
Continuing my reading of all the Nolan series books. In this 4th installment, Nolan plays a very different role, that of moderator. Nolan doesn't even make an appearance until about a third of the way into the book. The relationship between Jon and Nolan deepens and their wordplay is occasionally quite funny.

Members of the Des Moines DiPreta mobster family are being assassinated and the Chicago family, knowing of Nolan's connections with both families, if somewhat tenuous, in addition to knowing the possible shooter, wants him to intercede and stop the bloodshed.

If you enjoy the Parker series, you'll like Nolan as well, although, Nolan, getting older and looking for some kind of quiet retirement, becomes more likable and human. Note, there is enough back story to irritate those who have read the series so far, but also enough to make it a stand-alone.

Now on to the next one, Hard Cash.
Togar
This is more of a long short story rather than a full length novel. That having been said, it is vintage Collins. The writing is good, the characters are believable and there is a nice twist at the end. I will read others in the series.
Vuzahn
A++++
Clonanau
I like the new series characters. Good bad boys. Lots of fun. Just love Max Collins.
Zavevidi
Back in 2013, I started reading Max Allan Collins and his Nolan series, though I got side-tracked after about 3 books. Hush Money is the fourth in the series.

Best book ever? No, but I enjoyed it.

From memory of the previous books, Nolan is a thief-cum-heister who had a falling out with the mob which led to a bit of a war and Nolan being on their hit-list for a number of years. This situation is now resolved and Nolan manages a hotel for them and is kind of living life at a slower pace though boredom is setting in.

Nolan appears about a third of the way into this book. (I was kind of getting concerned that he was going to show up at all!) Someone has been targeting a mob family and taking them out one by one, in revenge for we don’t know what at this stage.

Nolan is brought in to resolve the situation, so business can carry on as usual.

Great characters, maybe not as much action as in previous books though I could be wrong. There’s an interesting dynamic between Nolan and his young side-kick John – friendship? Probably more of a father-son, mentoring type-thing, with John the comic book collector always seeking to handle himself in ways that impress Nolan, without being too obvious about it.

Is it just me or are criminals generally more interesting people to read about than straight Joe’s?

Decent resolution, which offers interesting possibilities for the direction of the next book – Hard Cash which also appeared in the same year as this – 1981.

There's an interesting 2012 intro from the author, which sheds some light on the origins and history of the series with a tasty tit-bit mentioning some irritation and a little bit of friction from Don Pendleton who was a little bit sore about Nolan. (Nolan incidentally pre-dated Bolan, at least from a writing date, if perhaps not in print.)

Pendleton had his Mack Bolan - Executioner series on the go, in which Mack Bolan has his own holy war with the mafia. I did read the first of his books fairly recently - War Against the Mafia.

I know which of the two I prefer and which I'll be reading more from. Roll on August - Hard Cash awaits me!

The full Nolan series is as follows:
1. Bait Money (1973)
2. Blood Money (1973)
3. Fly Paper (1981)
4. Hush Money (1981)
5. Hard Cash (1981)
6. Scratch Fever (1982)
7. Spree (1987)
8. Mourn the Living (1988)

Hush Money was bought for kindle a few years ago.

Read in July, 2015
Rarranere
I thought this book was very entertaining and an easy read. I'll read another by this author.
This is the worst Max Allan Collins I have read. I had to force myself to finish it.
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