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The Hundredth Man (Carson Ryder/Harry Nautilus Series) ePub download

by Dick Hill,Jack Kerley

  • Author: Dick Hill,Jack Kerley
  • ISBN: 1593555784
  • ISBN13: 978-1593555788
  • ePub: 1885 kb | FB2: 1235 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Mystery
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (June 7, 2004)
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 372
  • Format: lit docx rtf lrf
The Hundredth Man (Carson Ryder/Harry Nautilus Series) ePub download

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Written in the easy banter expected from a much more seasoned crime writer, Jack Kerley's "The Hundredth Man" is top-notch fiction, the starting chapter in what is likely to be a successful series of murder mystery. 3 people found this helpful.

Carson Ryder and Harry Nautilus are partners in newly formed unit (of two) dedicated to crimes .

Carson Ryder and Harry Nautilus are partners in newly formed unit (of two) dedicated to crimes that have a psychological bent, but they have a hard time getting validation from their peers when a case crops up. As the headless bodies pile up Ryder and Nautilus have to struggle to work within the bureaucracy of the police department while trying to put together leads.

Kerley's second novel brings us more of the two Mobile cops, Ryder and Nautilaus. This time they are after another serial killer wreaking havoc in the south Alabama town. Harry and Carson are a good pair of cops, each with a different attitude toward police work. This is a good follow up novel to the first by Mr. Kerley. The action moves along and the characters are interesting and well developed. There is good bit of wise cracking humor to relieve the tension.

The Hundredth Man book. Along with his partner Harry Nautilus, as the unfortunately named PSIT team (pronounced piss-it), he solves more unusual crimes. This is PSIT’s inaugural outing and is beset with problems, both from the crimes themselves and the politicking from above.

Carson Ryder and Harry Nautilus, police detectives in Mobile, Alabama . Shelve Detective Carson Ryder Thriller Series Books 1-3: The Hundredth Man, The Death Collectors, The Broken Souls.

Carson Ryder and Harry Nautilus, police detectives in Mobile, Alabama: Book 1. The Hundredth Man. by Jack Kerley.

But Ava's past holds its own nightmarish secrets.

With the body count growing, Ryder must confront his family's terrifying past by seeking advice from his brother, a violent psychopath convicted of similarly heinous crimes. But Ava's past holds its own nightmarish secrets. Ryder and Nautilus come to realize someone close to them is the killer's ultimate target-and time is running out before the killer plans to strike again.

Written by Jack Kerley, Audiobook narrated by Dick Hill. Carson Ryder/Harry Nautilus By: Jack Kerley. Narrated by: Dick Hill. Series: Carson Ryder/Harry Nautilus, Book 1. Length: 9 hrs and 58 mins. Categories: Mysteries & Thrillers, Modern Detective.

But Carson Ryder, a detective famous . But Carson Ryder, a detective famous for solving a series of brutal murders the previous year, sees something else: the deliberate placing of the body, the lack of blood, bizarre writing on the skin. Another torso, another, even stranger, message and the victim this time is no prostitute. There is a darkness at the heart of these killings which speaks of a psychopath out there in the night. I watched Harry Nautilus lean against the autopsy table and tell the World’s Greatest Joke to a dozen listeners holding napkin-wrapped cups and plastic wineglasses. Most were bureaucrats from the city of Mobile and Mobile County.

Detective Carson Ryder is good at this sort of thing – crazies and freaks . To his eyes it is no crime of passion, and when another mutilated victim turns up his suspicions are confirmed. This is not the work of a ‘normal’ murderer, but that of a serial killer, a psychopath. Famous for solving a series of crimes the year before, Carson Ryder has experience with psychopaths. But he had help with that case – strange help, from a past Ryder is trying to forget. Now he needs it again. Jack Kerley worked in advertising and teaching before becoming a full-time novelist. He lives in Newport, Kentucky, but also spends a good deal of time in Southern Alabama, the setting for The Hundredth Man.

When bizarre and cryptic messages are found on a pair of corpses in Mobile, Alabama, junior police detective Carson Ryder and veteran cop Harry Nautilus find themselves in a mysterious public-relations quagmire pitting public safety against office politics. With the body count growing, Ryder must confront his family’s terrifying past by seeking advice from his brother, a violent psychopath convicted of similarly heinous crimes. Ryder finds himself falling for Ava, the striking pathologist processing the gruesome corpses. But Ava’s past holds its own nightmarish secrets. Ryder and Nautilus come to realize someone close to them is the killer’s ultimate target—and time is running out before the killer plans to strike again.
Clodebd
Kerley is newly discovered by me and I was thrilled to discover he has many books in this series. I am working my way through every one. He is an amazing writer. I re-read some sentences just for the pleasure of reading them. Wonderful. Check him out.
Xisyaco
Carson Ryder and Harry Nautilus are partners in newly formed unit (of two) dedicated to crimes that have a psychological bent, but they have a hard time getting validation from their peers when a case crops up. As the headless bodies pile up Ryder and Nautilus have to struggle to work within the bureaucracy of the police department while trying to put together leads. As the leads dry up, Ryder turns to his brother Jeremy, a serial killer ensconced in an institute for "troubled" people who helps in in own way while exacting his pound of flesh.

Now, my problems with this novel center firmly around the editing and certain elements of the flow. I thought the story was good enough, so that wasn't the problem. I just keep noticing editing errors as I was reading or points that didn't belong I couldn't help but wonder after how ever many hands that manuscript had passed through why these things had not been fixed. These things seriously detracted from my opinion of this novel. Yes, I like Ryder and Nautilus, but the there was a lack of skill in working the plot and characters so one can only hope that he gets better.
Buge
My favorite genre--serial killers!!! the partnership between Carson and Nautilius works like a charm, love it! The bantering that goes on at the precinct is so realistic, the storyline had me glued. I am hooked on J.S Kerley books. Got some binge reading to do, yeah he is that good.
Capella
If you like your serial killers nasty as hell, your cops with issues, and your murders with .. Well .. Style .. Then Jack Kerleys books will make you very very happy. A cop who has a serial killer for a brother, who helps him on cases ... Really, what more could you want ? The books are super easy to read, and very hard to put down, great story lines, this is a very much over done genre but Mr Kerley has managed to put a new twist on it, that really works. If this type of book is your thing, don't hesitate, buy it now :)
Levion
With convincing forensics on par with Patricia Cornwall, a gritty homicide detective who'd be comfortable in the pages of Lawrence Block, and a plot recalling scenes from Thomas Harris, Jack Kerley's debut, like the title, beats those "one-in-hundred" odds. Off the more typically beaten tracks of LA, New York, or New Orleans, Kerley takes us to Mobile's gulf coast, crafting a slick tale of a psychopathic serial killer on the loose and the maverick cops who chase him.

When a headless corpse shows up in a Mobile park, detective Carson Rider of the newly formed "Psychopathological and Sociopatholgical Investigative Team" - PSIT - and partner Harry Nautilus are called to the scene. Bodies begin to pile up and suspense mounts in both the murders and in the corruption and politics of Mobile's police force. Chief medical examiner Dr. Claire Peltier, an icy professional as cold as her "patients", and homicide Captain Squill, the incompetent political boob we love to hate, headline a mostly believable and always entertaining supporting cast of gulf coast high-lifes and low-lifes variously engaged in committing or stopping crimes in and around Mobile. If Rider's help from death row psycho-killer brother Jeremy begins to feel a bit too much like Hannibal Lecter, clever plotting and page-turning suspense will quickly atone for these small sins. Written in the easy banter expected from a much more seasoned crime writer, Jack Kerley's "The Hundredth Man" is top-notch fiction, the starting chapter in what is likely to be a successful series of murder mystery.
Welahza
I bought this book three days ago and just finished it. That's a big deal for me since I haven't read a non-technical book in about 5 years (i work in technology, so all i mainly end up reading are books related to computers...yawn...). I ended up getting this book because I received a Kindle DX for fathers day and this book had been sitting in my wish list since 2005 (I think...). So here I am with a new ebook reader and a book I thought I'd be interested in sitting in my wishlist; available in Kindle format and way cheaper than it was when I first became interested in it. I told myself to go for it based on the sample I read. Well, the sample sucked me in and during the first half of the book, or a little less, I felt I was getting more than my moneys worth and found myself smiling to myself as I read it because I was feeling like I had this great find of a book sitting on my Kindle that I could peer at anytime I wanted to be entertained. And entertaining it was...emphasis on "was..."

By the midway point I found that my smiles turned to frowns and expressions that anyone who saw them could easily interpret as "what the....?" The book just got ridiculous to me. Reading it became laborious from the extra long descriptions of the scenery and constant introductions of new characters that came with description more lengthy than warranted given their role in the story. I also started to dislike the main character because it began to seem like the author was using the character as a vehicle to try impress the reader with his intellect. For some reason, to me, the main character's sexuality seemed to remain an odd undercurrent that vacillated off axis throughout. That point isn't material to the story, but it kept distracting me while reading this book. There were many other plot twists (or events that were attempted to be made plot twists) that just fell flat or were nonsensical to me-- the main character talks to someone twice and decides to devote time to saving them from alcoholism right in the middle of a major case that we are made to believe is so hot and heavy that it is supposed to consume all the waking hours of both detectives, but there's time to save a drunk and fall in love (I must have blinked and missed the part where they fell in love, but somewhere they did because it is abruptly mentioned in the flush like downward spiral that is the story's resolution). The cliché's were too much for me and the plot reveals were almost insulting. I really felt like I was too dumb to figure out some of the plot the way it was being spoon fed.

I'm on the fence if I am going to read another book by this author only because I notice that this was his debut. Perhaps the next one is better, but my last suspense benchmark was the DaVinci code and Digital Fortress which both had much better suspense.

Despite my 2 rating, I would recommend this book for light reading.
Acrobat
Unique style. Really good plot. Characters very well developed to the point of being real. Descriptions of events created believable mental images
Good read. Mobile is a novel setting no pun intended. Been there many times and never liked the Bankhead tunnel. A pretty old town.
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