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The Last Sherlock Holmes Story ePub download

by Michael Dibdin

  • Author: Michael Dibdin
  • ISBN: 0224015788
  • ISBN13: 978-0224015783
  • ePub: 1406 kb | FB2: 1507 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Mystery
  • Publisher: Pantheon Books; 1st edition (1978)
  • Pages: 192
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 902
  • Format: lrf doc lrf mobi
The Last Sherlock Holmes Story ePub download

The Last Sherlock Holmes Story is a Sherlock Holmes pastiche novel by Michael Dibdin.

The Last Sherlock Holmes Story is a Sherlock Holmes pastiche novel by Michael Dibdin. Holmes suspects the Ripper to be his nemesis, James Moriarty.

Sherlock Holmes was at that time virtually unknown outside the closed circles frequented by the police force and the . Will he be content to let the story tell itself?’ he mused

Sherlock Holmes was at that time virtually unknown outside the closed circles frequented by the police force and the criminal class. The public at large had hardly heard of him, for he took care that his name did not appear in the reports of the cases he undertook. Will he be content to let the story tell itself?’ he mused.

I don't like this book because I like Sherlock Holmes, and this book has a twist ending which most people especially for Sherlock Holmes fan will be disappointed but when I look at The Last Sherlock Holmes Story is a story about Sherlock Holmes and his friend Dr Watson

I don't like this book because I like Sherlock Holmes, and this book has a twist ending which most people especially for Sherlock Holmes fan will be disappointed but when I look at The Last Sherlock Holmes Story is a story about Sherlock Holmes and his friend Dr Watson. A packet of paper, written by the doctor lay hidden in a locked box.

Oxford Bookworms Library 3: The Last Sherlock Holmes Story. The Sherlock Holmes Book chronicles every case of the world's greatest detective and his assistant Dr Watson. The game is afoot and now you can discover every detail of Sherlock Holmes'world.

The Last Sherlock Holmes. has been added to your Cart. As conceived by the award-winning mystery writer Michael Dibdin, The Last Sherlock Holmes Story is a brilliantly inventive updating of the Holmes legend. Pitting master detective against archfiend, steely rationalism against satanic depravity, Dibdin gives us a Holmes who is more complex, more human, and ultimately more fascinating than the one imagined by Arthur Conan Doyle. Here is a riveting combination of history and fiction that confirms Dibdin's reputation as one of the most imaginative and atmospheric crime writers now at work.

Author: Michael Dibdin, Publisher: Oxford University Press - Oxford Bookworms Library, English stage/level: 3. .The detective, of course, was the great Sherlock Holmes - but why was the report kept hidden for so long? This is the story that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle never wrote

The detective, of course, was the great Sherlock Holmes - but why was the report kept hidden for so long? This is the story that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle never wrote. It is a strange and frightening tale. Michael Dibdinwas born on 21 March 1947 in England. He is best known for writing Aurelio Zen mysteries, a series of 11 detective novels about Italian society. These series were a great success for him; the first of them Ratking for instance, won the Golden Dagger award in 1988.

If this were one of . s tales you may be sure the action would follow fast and furious. s tales you may be sure the action would follow fast and furious ake it three days, and a much more satisfying story. But this is not a story, and I do not undertake to satisfy those seeking light relief from their daily cares. I must therefore record that during the two weeks immediately following the events just described, Holmes and I had nothing more to do with the mystery of the Whitechapel murderer.

Sherlock Holmes, because this is the last chapter and the book entitles The last Sherlock Holmes. After reading 1. In Chapter 5 we get Dr. Watson’s side of the story. But how did Sherlock Holmes see things?

Sherlock Holmes, because this is the last chapter and the book entitles The last Sherlock Holmes. I deduce that is the last Sherlock Holmes story because he die in this book. But how did Sherlock Holmes see things? Join these parts of sentences from a passage in Holmes’s diary.

There can be no question that the contents of this book will prove extremely controversial. Many people will be deeply shocked by the nature of Watson's statement. Many will no doubt prefer to reject it rather than surrender the beliefs of a lifetime. An extraordinary document comes to light which for fifty years had been held on deposit by the bankers of the deceased John Herbert Watson MD - better known as Dr Watson

The earlier books have a lightness of touch that gradually becomes much darker. The Last Sherlock Holmes Story (1978). A Rich Full Death (1986).

After publishing his first novel, a Sherlock Holmes pastiche, he lived for four years in Italy, teaching at the university in Perugia. Dibdin is best known for his Aurelio Zen mysteries, set in Italy. The first of these, Ratking, won the 'Gold Dagger' award of 1988. The earlier books have a lightness of touch that gradually becomes much darker. The character of Zen himself is anti-heroic, which adds much to the books' irony and black humour. A final Zen book, End Games, appeared posthumously in July 2007.

Sherlock Holmes answers the call of Scotland Yard and, with faithful Watson in attendance, seeks to uncover the identity of the brutal murderer of young women in London's East End
Narder
...interesting.

"I had rather be taken for a fraud, than have seen the many for whom Sherlock Holmes was an ideal and an example shattered and embittered on learning the horrible truth about their paragon." Michael Dibdin's John Watson says on the last pages of this book. Sadly the author didn't share these feelings.

While quite well written the book is unlikely to win any "Best Pastiche"-awards, as the author seems to be among the fans who insist that John Watson was the "real hero" of the Sherlock Holmes canon and sets out to prove his point by utterly ruining Holmes' reputation.

Certainly an arguable take on the matter and the author is within his rights, but this SH-fan is unlikely to reread this tale within her lifetime.
Eng.Men
For as long as memory serves, this has been a controversial book in Holmesian circles, one which I was warned off reading many years ago, and since being informed of the blasphemies within, have avoided like the plague. I do not appreciate new "interpretations" of the Canon that play with the characters to such an extent as to make them consistently unrecognizable, but herein lies the crux of it. Dibdin is one of a scant few authors with the uncanny ability to summon the very essence of the Great Detective and his doctor - yet while I normally delight in such talent for penning an authentic Watsonian narrative, there was no such elation to be had in these pages. The tone throughout is bleak and somber, though knowing what was to come made it an emotionally difficult, oft times disturbing book to get through.

The most unnerving part of it all is the way in which the Ripper clues are made to run parallel to what we know about Holmes, even several of his cases. Such was never more apparent as in the first 'Dear Boss' letter, which actually gave me chills when read in the context of the book. And it is not necessarily the nature of the explosive plot reveal that was so upsetting, but that the solid facts of both worlds were so eloquently intertwined. In short, this was in character and at least in the book's setting, was remotely plausible. That, I think, is what unsettled me so badly.

Even at this juncture, I am unsure how to rate it. It was exceptionally well written. It was suspenseful, evoked the mood of the Ripper's Whitechapel district, and for the first half of the book, with the investigation still underway, was unquestionably the best Holmes vs. Ripper novel I have read to date. However, if you love Holmes, this is bound to be a profoundly affecting, disturbing book that tosses your emotions into the proverbial wringer. Admittedly, the ending had me in tears. I loved it, while utterly despising it at the same time, especially the way in which it ended. Even then, there is one last act by Holmes that makes you want to love it all over again... while still seething in boiling hot hatred.

Needless to say, after coming to the end, I felt like I had been hit by a truck. It is not the sort of book one can really recommend, only advise other readers what it was and was not. For my own part, I only continued reading because the plot hinged on the final few pages of SIGN, where I can remember being very angry with Watson for so blithely overlooking that statement revealing the extent of Holmes' pain over his impending marriage. It is a point I have only ever seen touched on superficially, while the "what if's" are thoroughly rummaged through here. What I will state is that it is not a sensationalistic or trashy book intended to profit off Holmes, but be aware if you do decide to give it a chance, it *is* as profoundly disturbing as most Holmesians claim it to be.

Dibdin is a genuine (if heretical) devotee of Sherlock Holmes, who is also very well versed in his 'Ripperology', though I think it is fair to say he has written something that has to be the product of the most pernicious plot idea to ever haunt an author. Certainly, it will haunt me for a long time to come.
Hrguig
Dibdin does an incredibly astute impression of "Watson's" writing style but beyond that, its just recycling and re-interpretation of a lot of Holmes stories, completely devoid of any exploration of the fact that Sherlock Holmes is a classic Sociopath. Again, not a bad read, but except for the "twist" regarding the identities of both Moriarity and Jack the Ripper, most disappointing.

UNCLE FOX
dermeco
Whether you fell in love with the story or the storyteller will be the pivotal point of attitude during this final story of S. Holmes.
Of course, if you haven't familiarized yourself with Sir Conan Doyle's work, then before delving into this, it would only benefit if you would acquire the complete library and immerse yourself from start to finis. Afterward, take a departure into another adventure, another history, another tale. Only after following these instructions should you then read The 7 Percent Solution by John H. Watson and Nicholas Meyer (1974). Again, let that settle while endeavoring another detective or mystery or drama novel or novelette. Finally, open to page one and begin to be fascinated, disgusted, belittled, and betrayed...all while enjoying and being enwrapped in this perfectly fine mystery, or rather solution to the mystery. By the middle, you will (if you've avoided spoilers) attempt to question even your own assumptions as to who JTR may be. Is it Holmes? Is it Watson? Could it possibly be Lestrade? Or even more than one member of 'the Yard'? Is it M? Or is it just a very disturbed enigma never to be grasped? Again, if you are ever the conspiracy theorist, your suspicions will be raised up until the final chapter and verses. RIP RIP RIP RIP RIP RIP R.I.P. Hahaha (inside joke for after reading).
Modifyn
Michael Dibdin's writing is masterful and the story is gripping, but I was turned off by what seemed to me to be excessive description of bloody mayhem.
Arabella V.
I am a true and loyal fan of Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, however, I can accept Holmes as portrayed by other writers. Some other writers, that is, but not this one. I wanted to like this book but I couldn't. Michael Dibdin was a fine writer and I was fully expecting to enjoy this book. After all, it has great subject matter...Sherlock Holmes and Jack the Ripper. It turns out I didn't enjoy anything about this book.
There is no mystery in this novel because the mystery is given away halfway through the book. Reading the book from then on is anticlimactic. I didn't like the treatment of any of the main characters, not even Lestrade. The author's treatment of Watson is most unforgivable. Watson's comments and attitude regarding the Ripper's victims, for instance, were most disturbing; he seems to have no mercy at all for them and indeed, wonders why anyone would care if they died, including the victims themselves.
No, not my Watson.
Overall, it is a book both boring and disturbing. As for his treatment of Holmes...all I can say is what the hell did Holmes ever do to Michael Dibdin?
Danskyleyn
I've read nearly all the Sherlock Homes cases and "The Last Sherlock Holmes Story", to me, doesn't equal the others.
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