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Mischief: A Novel of the 87th Precinct ePub download

by Len Cariou,Ed McBain

  • Author: Len Cariou,Ed McBain
  • ISBN: 0694523291
  • ISBN13: 978-0694523290
  • ePub: 1794 kb | FB2: 1360 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Mystery
  • Publisher: HarperAudio; Audio edition (April 1, 1993)
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 344
  • Format: mobi docx doc mbr
Mischief: A Novel of the 87th Precinct ePub download

McBain, Ed, 1926-2005.

McBain, Ed, 1926-2005. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The 87th Precinct cops in Isola, New York . Shelve Ed McBain: Seven 87th Precinct Novels.

The 87th Precinct cops in Isola, New York: Book 1. Cop Hater. Three chillers from the files of the 87t. ore.

Fiddlers, his final 87th Precinct novel, was recently published in hardcover. Writing as both Ed McBain and Evan Hunter, he broke new ground with Candyland, a novel in two parts. Classic Ed McBain and the 87th Precinct

Fiddlers, his final 87th Precinct novel, was recently published in hardcover. He also wrote the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds. Classic Ed McBain and the 87th Precinct. Maybe a little short of the very best of the series, but plenty of interesting characters, plot twists, and insight into the life of a metropolitan cop. Police procedural fans will like it, and 87th Precinct fans will love it!

The latest in the 87th Precinct series, this bizarre and gripping novel shows why MWA Grand Master McBain is acclaimed for his stories about police at work in a big city.

The latest in the 87th Precinct series, this bizarre and gripping novel shows why MWA Grand Master McBain is acclaimed for his stories about police at work in a big city. Detectives Carella and Hawes are investigating the murder of Fr. Birney at St. Catherine's, a church near the headquarters of satanists, which makes them obvious suspects.

Estimated delivery: Wed, Jan 15th. Returns/refunds accepted.

Debuting in 1956, the popular 87th Precinct is one of the longest running crime series ever published, featuring over fifty novels, and is hailed as one of the great literary accomplishments of the last half-century. McBain was awarded the Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement in 1986 by the Mystery Writers of America and was the first American to receive the Cartier Diamond Dagger award from the Crime Writers Association of Great Britain.

The 87th Precinct is a series of police procedural novels and stories written by Ed McBain (pseudonym of Evan Hunter). McBain's 87th Precinct works have been adapted, sometimes loosely, into movies and television on several occasions. The series is based on the work of the police detective squad of the 87th Precinct in the central district of Isola, a large fictional city based on New York City

With trademark wit and sizzling dialogue, Ed McBain unravels a mystery that takes us to the outer edge of the city and . And most choose their prey for a reason, not randomly. The detectives of the 87th Precinct are stumped by a serial killer who doesn't fit the profile

With trademark wit and sizzling dialogue, Ed McBain unravels a mystery that takes us to the outer edge of the city and examines the dreams we chase in the darkening hours, before the fiddlers have fled. Most serial killers don't shoot their victims twice in the face with a Glock. The detectives of the 87th Precinct are stumped by a serial killer who doesn't fit the profile. A blind violinist taking a smoke break, a cosmetics sales rep cooking an omelet in her kitchen, a college professor trudging home from class, a priest contemplating retirement in the rectory garden, an old woman walking her dogthese are the seemingly chance targets.

In this 87th Precinct thriller, Detective Steve Carella must track down a killer who's systematically rubbing out all the city's graffiti artists, leaving each victim mischievously splashed with paint and blood.

Listen to unlimited audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In this 87th Precinct thriller, Detective Steve Carella must track down a killer who's systematically rubbing out all the city's graffiti artists, leaving each victim mischievously splashed with paint and blood. Foul play takes another form when an old nemesis, the Dead Man, taunts Carella and the eight-seven with riddling clues for solving a crime – or crimes – not yet committed.

Читать онлайн - McBain Ed. The Heckler Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн The Heckler. Mcbain Ed. The 87th Precinct series one of the great literary accomplishments of the last half-century. Pete Hamill,Daily News (New York) It’s hard to think of anyone better at what he does. In fact, it’s impossible.

In this 87th Precinct thriller, Detective Steve Carella must track down a killer who's systematically rubbing out all the city's graffiti artists, leaving each victim mischievously splashed with paint and blood.  Foul play takes another form when an old nemesis, the Dead Man, taunts Carella and the eight-seven with riddling clues for solving a crime - or crimes - not yet committed.  Given what he's deduced from the prankish perpetrator, Carella strongly suspects the crime will take place during a free rock and rap concert scheduled to take place in the city's largest park.  As Carella tries desperately to second guess him, the Dead Man meticulously puts together a plan to carry off a multi-million dollar coup.  Soon Carella finds himself racing against time in a game of wits that could leave the city reeling under an onslaught of dirty tricks from one of the underworld's masters of criminal mischief.

Fani
Mischief has the Deaf Man as its main character and what a main character he is. Is there a smarter character, hero or villain, in crime fiction than the Deaf Man? No way. (Is he McBain's DARK alter ego, as Hope and Carella are his "good" alter ego?) As per usual, bad things are happening in the big bad city. But the Deaf Man creates special problems for the 87th. He provides (and harrasses) Carella and his mates with clues etc. to his upcoming nefarious action, which will take place on a grand scale. But the best part of this story concerns a black rap band and its leader--no p.c. condescension in his treatment of the band, the rock concert of which they are to be a major act and their plot action, just honest, good and accurate writing about our "in trouble" society and about the individuals whose stories actually make this society come to life. A killing near the end of the story takes your breath away and gives much "haunting" food for thought. Much mischief in the city. Cops really are having trouble capturing and containing the bad guys. No plot spoilers here. Read the book. It is great.
Alister
Finished Mischief by Fay Weldon and gave it 3 1/2 stars. I thought I was going to love this as FW is one of my favourite authors. The 1st half is wonderful with lots of typical FW wry comments by the woman whose husband dies and she remarries very soon thereafter. BUT then it went weird with supernatural exploration which is not my thing.
Clandratha
This book, which was first published in 1993, is the 45th entry in the 87th Precinct series. A lot has changed in the thirty-seven years since Cop Hater, the first in the series, was released, and as the books progress, one can watch the evolution of the technology used by police to fight crime from index cards and penciled notes to the advent of computers and much more sophisticated forensics.

The books themselves have changed as well. Cop Hater was very much a book of the old-school pulp novel tradition from an age when books like this were mostly sold of off spinning racks in the neighborhood drug store. Many of these books were little longer than a novella, and could easily be consumed in a single evening. Cop Hater, for example, told a gripping story in a bare 236 pages.

By the early 1990s, though, crime novels had become a more respectable form of entertainment, now enjoyed even by relatively sophisticated readers, many of whom would have never admitted to reading the "trashy" pulp novels of the Fifties. The books themselves had begun to bulk up, perhaps as a sign of their growing respectability, and Mischief weighs in at 420 pages--almost twice as long as the book that first introduced the detectives of the 87th Precinct. This was not necessarily a bad thing; a good book is a good book irrespective of its length, while a bad one is still going to suck no matter how brief it might be.

Judging by this book though, McBain might have been better off sticking to the shorter form. He winds up producing a much longer book not by telling a more complex story, but rather by cramming together three entirely separate investigations into one novel. Even this wouldn't necessarily be a problem; in the earlier books, the detectives were often working a couple of cases at a time.

The difficulty lies in the fact is that all three of these cases are very convoluted and McBain leaps from one investigation to another, often several times in the same chapter, sometimes devoting only a few short paragraphs to one case before jumping on to the next. This is further complicated by the fact that there's a large cast of characters involved and several different teams of detectives investigating the cases, and in the end it all gets extremely confusing at points. There's no relaxing into this book; you've got to be constantly paying attention to keep everything straight.

One thing that hasn't changed involves the detectives themselves. In thirty-seven years, they haven't changed a bit. Casting an eye around the squad room, McBain notes that all of the detectives are in their middle thirties, which is pretty much where they were when the series began. (In fairness, this is not entirely McBain's fault. His initial plan was to have a rotating cast of characters, and detectives would come and go just as one would expect to see on a real police force. Very early in the series, he killed off one of the detectives who had become the lead protagonist up to that point, and his publisher threw a fit. They made him rewrite the ending of the book so that the detective would live and could go on to star in another fifty-odd books. Like most fans of this series, I've grown to really enjoy this cast of characters and so I'm glad McBain was forced to deviate from his original plan, but it might have been interesting to see how the series would have evolved had he stuck to his guns.)

The first of the disparate plots in the book involves the 87th Precinct's persistent nemesis, the Deaf Man, who returns to taunt the detectives with a great new scheme. He spends most of the book running them around in circles and, as always, it's fun to watch the battle of wits that results.

In another case, someone is killing graffiti writers who are defacing the walls and other blank spaces of the city. Naturally, some citizens are applauding the killer and feel that the "writers" are getting exactly what they deserve. But the cops still feel the need to track down the killer and put a stop to his vigilante justice. Finally, someone is dumping elderly people with dementia in public places around the city and attempting to destroy any means of identifying these people who will then have to be cared for by the general public. Some of these poor people are being left out in the elements and after one elderly woman dies, the case becomes increasingly serious.

This is not a bad book by any stretch of the imagination, but McBain has clearly padded the daylights out of it, perhaps to accommodate emerging trends. It would have been a much more entertaining read at 320 pages than at 420. Of the three investigations, the one involving elder dumping is the least interesting and it has the feel of being tacked on to the rest of the story. The book would have been much tighter and more enjoyable had this whole plot line been left on the cutting room floor. In the end, Mischief falls into the middle of the pack of the books in this series, not the worst, but certainly not among the best.
Forey
87th Precinct books are awesome! My
Simple fellow
this had too many characters. too hard to keep up with them all
MeGa_NunC
awesome
Nirad
Overly reliant , to my taste, on the paranormal but a quick easy read.
This is another terrific entry in McBain's long running 87th Precinct series of police novels. Its a well plotted combination of three short stories that come together to make a book. One storyline involves dumping elderly people when they become too difficult to care for. Another one is about someone murdering the city's graffiti artists and the third one deals with the Deaf Man's heist of the precinct's stock of confiscated drugs. The Deaf Man is a recurrent villain in the series and his appearance always wrecks havoc with the cops of the 87th. As always the book is well written and the three stories combine for a fun read.
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