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Before You Get Your Puppy ePub download

by Ian Dunbar

  • Author: Ian Dunbar
  • ISBN: 1888047003
  • ISBN13: 978-1888047004
  • ePub: 1431 kb | FB2: 1209 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Pets & Animal Care
  • Publisher: James & Kenneth Pub; First Edition edition (August 20, 2001)
  • Pages: 104
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 751
  • Format: lit azw rtf lrf
Before You Get Your Puppy ePub download

Before and After Getting Your Puppy: The Positive Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy, and Wel. y Dr. IanĀ .

Ships from and sold by books4little. Veterinarian, animal behaviorist, and author Dr. Ian Dunbar is Director of the Center for Applied Animal Behavior, Founder of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, and host of the British TV series "Dogs with Dunbar. Dr. Dunbar is the author of numerous books and videos, including "SIRIUS Puppy Training" and "How To Teach A New Dog Old Tricks. Ian lives in Berkeley, California, with little brown dog Oliver, large brown dog Claude, and a kitty called Mitty.

Before you choose your puppy, you need to know how to assess your prospective puppy's current socialization and educational status. 3. An errorless housetraining and chewtoy-training program should be instituted from the very first day your puppy comes home. When you choose a new puppy, you need to meet six developmental deadlines before your puppy is just five months old. If your puppy fails to meet any of these deadlines, he will never achieve his full potential and will be playing "behavioral catch-up" for the rest of his life.

Before & After Getting Your Puppy: The Positive Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy & Well-Behaved Do. However, I do think Ian Dunbar is rather unrealistic and terribly discouraging. As I began reading this book, I thought this was IT, the Holy Grail of dog/puppy training.

Before & After Getting Your Puppy: The Positive Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy & Well-Behaved Dog. ISBN. 1888047003 (ISBN13: 9781888047004). But I quickly realized that with my 9 week old puppy, according to Dunbar, I was already a total failure.

When you choose a new puppy, you need to meet six developmental deadlines before your puppy is just five months old. "BEFORE You Get Your Puppy" covers the first three developmental deadlines covering the period of puppy selection until your puppy's first week at home. 2nd Developmental Deadline: Evaluating Your Prospective Puppy's Progress - Before you choose your puppy, you need to know how to assess your prospective puppy's current socialization and educational status.

He has a book 'before you get your puppy', I think it would be good to read this book also. The two books overlap. The second book would be easier if the first one has already been read. I found this book when my pup was three months old. I am already behind, I so wish I could have found his material before bringing the pup home. If you are getting a pup or know someone who is, please, look into this. Truly, I have found this data no where else.

Before & After Getting Your Puppy is a simple, practical guide for anyone bringing a new puppy into the family.

eBook (PDF), 104 Pages. Please, read this book if you are thinking about getting a puppy. How can I use this format?

Get it BEFORE you get your puppy.

Get it BEFORE you get your puppy. This book is fantastic - Dr. Dunbar is clear and concise with his instructions, and his techniques are strongly rooted in animal behavior science. I'm considering becoming a first time dog owner, and Dr. Dunbar's frankness and honesty were very appreciated, as were his very creative and surprisingly doable training techniques. I feel confident in my decision to get a puppy now, and his instructions/guides have given me a very good idea of what to expect and how to prepare.

Before You Get Your Puppy. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9781888047004.

Ian Dunbar is a veterinarian and animal behaviorist, founder of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, and the author and star of numerous books and videos on dog behavior and training. He lives in Berkeley, California with his wife, trainer Kelly Dunbar, and their three dogs

Ian Dunbar is a veterinarian and animal behaviorist, founder of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, and the author and star of numerous books and videos on dog behavior and training. He lives in Berkeley, California with his wife, trainer Kelly Dunbar, and their three dogs.

When you choose a new puppy, you need to meet six developmental deadlines before your puppy is just five months old. If your puppy fails to meet any of these deadlines, he will never achieve his full potential and will be playing "behavioral catch-up" for the rest of his life. BEFORE You Get Your Puppy covers the first three developmental deadlines covering the period from puppy selection to your puppy's first week at home: 1. Before you search for a puppy, you need to complete your education about puppy education. 2. Before you choose your puppy, you need to know how to assess your prospective puppy's current socialization and educational status. 3. An errorless housetraining and chewtoy-training program should be instituted from the very first day your puppy comes home.
Dream
I read and summarized this book in three hours as I prepare to adopt a puppy. This book is most useful for those preparing to adopt an eight-week-old puppy from a breeder as the author has outlined precise timeframes in which the optimal, hands-on, developmental conditioning MUST occur. The fate of older dogs or puppies not exposed to this plan appears dim according to the author, so that made the book a bit difficult to read. However, the teachings were helpful, so I am still really glad I read it and organized it into a more concise format. Below is an outline of my personal takeaways. This is not meant as a substitute for the author's words or for reading the book, but perhaps it can serve as a post-read reminder for some!

Six Developmental Deadlines:

1. Your Doggy Education (before searching)
a. Do research on breeds.
b. Seek advice from several sources. Seek training and behavior advice from trainers and behavior counselors; seek health advice from veterinarians; seek breed advice from breeders; seek product advice from pet-store personnel; go to a local puppy class and chat with owners.
c. Shopping List:
i. books/videos about puppy behavior and training (see list in back of book)
ii. dog crate (Vari Kennel) and an exercise pen or baby gate barrier
iii. at least six chewtoys to stuff with kibble and treats (Kong products, Biscuit Balls, and sterilized longbones)
iv. doggy toilet (construct your own): equip a litter box or cover a piece of old linoleum with what will be the dog's eventual toilet material, such as turf.
v. water bowl (for use once he is socialized, well-trained, and has impeccable household manners)
vi. dog food (dry kibble); during first weeks at home, he should receive all food stuffed in chewtoys, or handfed as rewards for socialization and training
vii. freeze-dried liver for use with men, strangers, and children to win puppy's confidence and as rewards for housetraining
viii. Martingale collar, leash, and maybe a Gentle Leader (Premier Pet Products) [...]

2. Evaluating Puppy's Progress (before selection)
a. By the time puppy is selected, usually at eight weeks of age, puppy should already:
i. be thoroughly accustomed/desensitized to sounds before he is four weeks old.
1. Stimuli while his eyes and ears are still developing allow the puppy to gradually become accustomed.
2. Ask the breeder about the extent of the litter's exposure to domestic noise as well as loud and unexpected noises, such as adults shouting, children crying, television (make voices shouting and screaming on ESPN), radio, and music (Country, Rock, and Classical - maybe Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture).
3. Judge whether the puppy reacts or overreacts to sounds (talking, laughing, crying, shouting, a whistle, a hiss, a single hand clap), and time how long it takes for the puppy to approach and take a food treat (the bounce-back time).
ii. be handled by many people, especially men, children, and strangers in the safety of home (due to immunization injection schedule) in the first three months. Look for puppies raised indoors around human companionship and influence.
1. Ask the breeder how many people have handled, gentled, trained, and played with the pups daily; specifically, how many children, men and strangers?
2. Socializing with a hundred people by 8 weeks old is recommended, followed by an additional hundred people during his first month at home.
3. Basic handling exercises:
a. make sure the dog enjoys being gently restrained (snuggled, cuddled, and hugged) ; specifically, see how he enjoys being stroked and massaged (examined) around his neck, muzzle, ears, paws, belly, and rear end.
b. find out whether he relaxes like a ragdoll or kicks and struggles; if he struggles, hold him gently while soothingly stroking him between the eyes or massage his ears or chest, and see how quickly you can calm him down.
iii. be underway w/ errorless housetraining and chewtoy-training.
iv. have a rudimentary understanding of basic manners; at the very least: come, sit, lie down, roll over.

3. Errorless Housetraining (before homecoming)
a. Errorless housetraining and chewtoy-training is instituted prior to and immediately upon puppy coming home. YOU SHOULD TREAT ANY PUPPY HOUSESOILING OR HOUSE-DESTRUCTION MISTAKE AS A POTENTIAL DISASTER as these habits are near-impossible to un-learn.
b. When you are physically or mentally absent, confine puppy; the more you confine your puppy to his Doggy Den and Puppy Playroom during the first few weeks at home, the more freedom he will enjoy later.
c. Long-term Confinement Area (aka Puppy Playroom):
i. Confines the puppy to an area where chewing and toilet behavior is acceptable, so the puppy does not make any chewing or housesoiling mistakes around the house.
ii. Maximizes the likelihood that puppy will learn to use the provided toilet, chew only chewtoys, and settle down calmly without barking.
iii. When you are not at home, keep puppy confined to a fairly small Puppy Playroom, such as kitchen, bathroom, or utility room; you can also use an exercise pen to cordon off a small section of a room.
iv. Include a comfortable bed, a bowl of fresh water, plenty of hollow chewtoys (stuffed with dog food), a doggy toilet in the farthest corner from the bed.
d. Short-Term Confinement Area (aka Doggy Den):
i. Confines puppy to an area where chewing behavior is acceptable so puppy does not make chewing mistakes around the house.
ii. Makes the puppy a chewtoyaholic and teaches puppy to settle down calmly and happily for periodic quiet moments.
iii. Prevents housesoiling mistakes around the house and allows you to predict when the puppy needs to eliminate.
iv. Should include a comfortable bed and plenty of hollow chewtoys (stuffed w/ dog food).
v. Crate may be in same room or different room. If opposed to the idea of confining puppy to a crate, you may tie the leash to your belt and have puppy settle down at your feet. Or fasten the leash to an eye-hook in the baseboard next to your puppy's bed, basket, or mat. To prevent the chewtoys from rolling out of reach, also tie them to the eye-hook.
e. When home, enjoy short play and training sessions hourly. If you cannot pay full attention to your puppy every single second, play with puppy in Puppy Playpen. For periods of no longer than an hour at a time, confine Puppy to Doggy Den.
i. Puppy bladder capacity is 45 minutes at three weeks, 75 minutes at eight weeks, 90 minutes at twelve weeks, and two hours at 18 weeks. However, it's easier to remember to routinely awaken for a potty break each hour on the hour.
ii. Every hour, release puppy and quickly RUN him (on-leash if necessary) to toilet area. (Usually, puppies urinate within half a minute of waking up from a nap and usually defecate within a couple of minutes of that, so it's better to wake up the puppy yourself when you are ready and the time is right.) Be there to show puppy the right spot, verbally instruct him to eliminate, and give him three minutes to do so. If he does not eliminate in three minutes, put puppy back in the crate and try again in half an hour, repeating until he succeeds. Enthusiastically praise puppy for eliminating in the right spot, offer three freeze-dried liver treats, and then enjoy a short play/training session indoors. Play chewtoy games: chewtoy-search, chewtoy-fetch, chewtoy tug-o'-war, etc.
iii. At three months, puppy is old enough to go outside to eliminate. Take him to the designated spot, stand still and let him circle around you on a leash; after he eliminates, praise him and take him for a walk as a reward. After a couple of weeks, you can take puppy off-leash and let him choose where he would like to eliminate, but reward him according to how close he is to the spot; offer one treat for doing it outside quickly, two treats for doing it within five yards of the spot, three treats for within two yards, and five treats for a bull's eye.
iv. If you catch puppy in a potty training mistake, basically, assume it's your fault; at the very most, you can quickly, softly implore puppy, "outside, outside, outside!" with an urgent tone.
v. Never reprimand your dog in a manner that is not instructive.
f. Before confining puppy to his crate (Doggy Den), you first need to teach him to love the crate and love confinement. Stuff a couple of hollow chewtoys with kibble and the occasional treat. Let your puppy sniff the stuffed chewtoys and then place them IN the crate and shut the door with puppy on the outside. Once puppy begs you to open the door, let him inside. When leaving puppy in Puppy Playroom, tie stuffed chewtoys to the inside of the crate and leave the crate door open; puppy can choose whether to explore the Playroom or lie down in the crate with the chewtoys.
g. For the first few weeks at home, put away his food bowl and, apart from using kibble as lures and rewards for training, pre-measure and serve all of puppy's kibble stuffed in chewtoys. The goal is to keep puppy occupied and to teach puppy to only chew on chewtoys. To keep puppy interested in Kong chewtoys, squish a small piece of freeze-dried liver in the small hole in the tip so puppy will never be able to get it out; smear a little honey around the inside of the kong, fill it with kibble, then block the big hole with crossed dog biscuits; moisten puppy's kibble, spoon it into the Kong, then put it in the freezer overnight.
h. Once puppy has not had a chewing or housesoiling mishap for at least three months, you may increase puppy's playroom to two rooms. For each subsequent month without a mistake, puppy may gain access to another room, until eventually he enjoys free run of the house. If mistakes or accidents occur, go back to the original puppy confinement program for at least a month.
i. If puppy barks or whines, reward-train him to rest quietly. Sit next to puppy's crate or just outside his puppy playroom and busy yourself, completely ignoring puppy while he vocalizes. Each time he stops barking, immediately praise him calmly and offer piece of kibble. After half a dozen repititions, progressively increase the shush-time required for each successive piece of kibble - two seconds, three, five, eight, fifteen, twenty, etc. Thereafter, periodically praise and reward your puppy every few minutes or so if he remains resting quietly.
j. At night, confine puppy to a small nighttime sleep area and offer an intelligently stuffed chewtoy so he will chew himself to sleep. Once you have housetrained and chewtoy-trained puppy and he has learned to settle down quickly and quietly, you may allow pup to choose where he would like to sleep. Should puppy whine at nighttime, check on him every ten minutes. Talk softly to him and stroke him gently for a minute, then go back to bed ; reassure puppy, but do not overdo it.

4. Socialization with People (by 12 weeks of age), Socialization with Dogs (after 12 weeks):
a. Dogs must be well socialized toward people before they attend puppy classes at twelve weeks of age. During puppy's first month at home, he needs to meet and interact with at least one hundred different people. In addition to friendly interaction, have them practice basic handling exercise and command training with your dog.
b. Command Training:
i. Sit: Waggle a food lure in front of puppy's nose, and then raise the lure (palm upward) just a little while saying "sit". As puppy looks up to follow the lure, he will sit. Say "good sit" and offer the food as reward.
ii. Down: Waggle a food lure in front of puppy's nose, then lower the lure (palm downward) to just in front of puppy's forepaws, saying "down." Puppy will lower his nose to follow the lure and then lie down. Say "good down" and maybe offer food.
iii. Stand: Move the kibble away from puppy, hold the treat at nose level and say "stand," but lower it a tad as soon as puppy stands up and starts to sit; otherwise, puppy will sit as soon as he stands. "Good stand."
iv. Come: Back up a couple of steps, say "Come here," and wave the kibble. Praise puppy, "good come" as he approaches, then ask him to sit and lie down before offering the kibble.
v. Practice these commands in random sequences. See how many position changes puppy is willing to do for one food reward and how long you can keep puppy in each position (short stays) before giving each food reward. Strangely, the fewer treats you give and the longer you keep each treat in your hand, the better puppy will learn.
c. As soon as puppy turns three months old, it is time to add dog-dog socialization: puppy classes, long walks, and visits to dog parks.

5. Bite Inhibition (by 18 weeks of age):
a. Window for developing "soft mouth" begins to close at four-and-a-half months, about the time when the adult canine teeth first show.
b. Enroll him in puppy class as soon as he reaches three months of age.
c. Puppy play-biting and play-fighting is normal; the more dogs bite as puppies, the softer and safer their jaws in adulthood.

6. Preventing Adolescent Problems (by 5 months):
a. Puppy needs to be walked at least once a day once vet says it's safe.
b. Puppy may be taken for rides in the car and to visit friends' houses as early as desired.
c. Socialization must never end; an adolescent dog will begin to desocialize unless he continues to meet unfamiliar people every day on walks or socially at home.

For help: Association of Pet Dog Trainers at 1-800-PET-DOGS or [...]
Raelin
I still recommend this to all my friends who tend to ignore me until after they get their puppy and realize they need a guide, at which time I point them towards After You Get Your Puppy! :P This is a very helpful book though and I recommend reviewing it prior to adding any new dog to your house.
Kagda
I am a dog trainer and was assigned this book for our continued education. For trainers the information is repetitive and fairly obvious. This being said, I haven't had a puppy in over 8 years and the information was very well received. Even being experienced as I am, I still picked up a few tips and pointers that I will definitely use for my next puppy and even for my 8 and 4 year old mutts! I recommend this book to anyone that has a dog, especially if you have never had one before or are thinking about adding a puppy to your family. One key message, socialize, socialize, socialize; do it before the socialization window closes, and do it the right way. Dr. Ian Dunbar can help you raise a wonderful companion, you won't regret reading this easy, helpful book.
Nuadora
Overall good but I thought a lot of what he said impossible. So did other owners, breeders and trainers. Eg the puppy should be able to sit, down, stay when you get it from the breeder. Impossible. Takes a little time to teach these and an 8 week old puppy is thinking about playing and chewing. How could a breeder with half a dozen pups possibly teach her pups these things before they r adopted at 8 or 9 weeks.
Direbringer
This is a very well thought out book if you have not yet purchased a puppy. If you have a dog older than 12 weeks the principles of the book still apply but it is full of warnings about developmental timelines that are not applicable to older puppies or rescue dogs--in fact they just scared me. Other books (eg. Woodhouse's) address both puppies and older dogs.
Ranterl
Worst dog book I've ever read. Keeps repeating the same stuff and really doesn't teach ANYTHING.
Kagrel
Ian's advice is easy to read and practical. I found most of the answers I was looking for. Unfortunately he comes off almost arrogant declaring how "easy" things like house training are. The problem with this is if the puppy doesn't behave as he predicts there's little commentary on how to determine why.

If you follow instructions you'll probably be OK, but if at any point the puppy doesn't behave as advertised you're going to have to look elsewhere for help.
This book is a must read for anyone considering buying a puppy or adopting a dog. There is so much to consider before making the huge commitment a puppy requires. This book lays it all out there and makes the potential new owner aware of what they are getting into and how best to prepare for their dog. So many puppies are bought because they are cute, but wind up in shelters by age 1 or 2 due to "bad behavior" that is a complete result of the first owner's lack of training/commitment to the dog's development. Be responsible and read this book!
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