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The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council ePub download

by Andrew Greeley

  • Author: Andrew Greeley
  • ISBN: 0520244818
  • ISBN13: 978-0520244818
  • ePub: 1278 kb | FB2: 1698 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: World
  • Publisher: University of California Press; First edition (March 10, 2004)
  • Pages: 237
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 519
  • Format: rtf lrf azw lrf
The Catholic Revolution: New  Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council ePub download

Greeley's Catholics who stay because they like being Catholic are the ones the Revolution worked for because they've got a compatible or likeable Catholic cultural milieu to fit into. Those who don't, have little reason to stay.

Greeley's Catholics who stay because they like being Catholic are the ones the Revolution worked for because they've got a compatible or likeable Catholic cultural milieu to fit into. In the 1960s, Andrew Greeley was often accused of never having had an unpublished thought.

The Catholic Revolution book.

How, a mere generation after Vatican Council II initiated the biggest reform since the Reformation, can the Catholic .

Greeley was born into a large Irish Catholic family in Oak Park, Illinois (a suburb . The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council (2004); ISBN 0-520-24481-8.

Greeley was born into a large Irish Catholic family in Oak Park, Illinois (a suburb of Chicago) in 1928. He grew up during the Great Depression in Chicago's Austin neighborhood, where he attended St. Angela Elementary School, and by the second grade, he knew that he wanted to be a priest. After studying at Archbishop Quigley. The prayer journal was neither a book of prayers nor a book about prayer but rather an experience of praying, to dialogue with God. It is prayer as it happens. Priests: A Calling in Crisis (2004).

Home Browse Books Book details, The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old. Greeley tackles the big question of how the Roman Catholic Church could be in such deep trouble just a generation removed from its biggest reform

Home Browse Books Book details, The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old. The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council. Greeley tackles the big question of how the Roman Catholic Church could be in such deep trouble just a generation removed from its biggest reform. once again he shows us why millions of American Catholics trust him to be their voice. -Mike Hout, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley.

Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Издание: 1st. Язык: english. ISBN 13: 9780520238176. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Matematyka Dyskretna.

Andrew Greeley reappears now at a moment when I, and I suspect others . In the second part of the book, Greeley's argument becomes more personal.

Andrew Greeley reappears now at a moment when I, and I suspect others, really need him, addressing a question that has been bothering me for some time. Old Wineskins" explains the rule-bound rigidity of the pre-conciliar church. It was a defense against attacks from Enlightenment anti-clericals and revolutionary liberals.

the "new wine" burst the "old wineskins. This book is about the revolutionary impact of the Second Vatican Council on the Catholic Church in the United States. The revolution that Greeley describes brought about changes that continue to reverberate-in a chasm between leadership and laity, and in a whole generation of Catholics who have become Catholic on their own terms.

Andrew Greeley, today an older Catholic priest who attended the third session of the Second Vatican Council, better known for . Greeley presents a metaphor: New wine poured into old wineskins and the wineskins break

Andrew Greeley, today an older Catholic priest who attended the third session of the Second Vatican Council, better known for his novels and TV ‘talk show’ appearances, writes this book as an empirical sociologist. He presents the results of several sociological surveys about religious topics that he and others ran before and after the Council. The surveys reveal a significant decline from 1962 to 1972 in values and attitudes that Catholics have always held dear. Greeley presents a metaphor: New wine poured into old wineskins and the wineskins break. The old wineskins were the pre-existing structures and the upper clergy’s attachments to them.

The Catholic Revolution : New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council. by Andrew M. Greeley.

How, a mere generation after Vatican Council II initiated the biggest reform since the Reformation, can the Catholic Church be in such deep trouble? The question resonates through this new book by Andrew Greeley, the most recognized, respected, and influential commentator on American Catholic life. A timely and much-needed review of forty years of Church history, The Catholic Revolution offers a genuinely new interpretation of the complex and radical shift in American Catholic attitudes since the second Vatican Council (1962-1965). Drawing on a wealth of data collected over the last thirty years, Greeley points to a rift between the higher and lower orders in the Church that began in the wake of Vatican Council II―when bishops, euphoric in their (temporary) freedom from the obstructions of the Roman Curia, introduced modest changes that nonetheless proved too much for still-rigid structures of Catholicism: the "new wine" burst the "old wineskins." As the Church leadership tried to reimpose the old order, clergy and the laity, newly persuaded that "unchangeable" Catholicism could in fact change, began to make their own reforms, sweeping away the old "rules" that no longer made sense. The revolution that Greeley describes brought about changes that continue to reverberate―in a chasm between leadership and laity, and in a whole generation of Catholics who have become Catholic on their own terms. Coming at a time of crisis and doubt for the Catholic Church, this richly detailed, deeply thoughtful analysis brings light and clarity to the years of turmoil that have shaken the foundations, if not the faith, of American Catholics.
Mr.Bean
I really enjoyed this book and have given it as a gift. Wonderful perspective on Vatican II.
Zinnthi
I have always like Greeley's books, but this is the first non-novel I have read. His writing method remains as fluid as ever, although I do appreciate his views as a socialist, also. We have a book club mainly made up of former DREs and most of us have expressed a very positive view of this book.
Froststalker
Pretty much boils down to the idea that (American) Catholics who stay "in" the church, do so "because they like being Catholic".

Which apparently means they like the familiar "American Catholic" culture or ethnicity (ethnicities: Irish, German, Polish) that they were born and raised in: the rituals, color, music, customs ("May crownings"). The vernacular language change they accept as good, the Vatican, medieval ethics and theology they ignore (and have been for decades.) Greeley himself comes from ethnic/cultural Catholicism with good music and colorful liturgies and customs, so he's got a good "born Catholic" culture to like.

But there's little here in this compendium/rehash of Greeley's previous writings to lead someone not born into one of those likeable traditions to turn to Catholicism, or of help to anyone who converted because of the attraction of Catholic theology and the Vatican II vision of Church despite the poverty and disfunction of a local Irish Catholic culture of minimal liturgical beauty (concentration on "validity" as good enough) and little or awful music and zero spiritual content. Or who now find themselves stuck in a parish with all the same (updated with awful music) and now overlaid with a return of authoritarian top down heavy handed management from the Vatican and local bishops, the rollback of the Vatican reforms, and the crackdowns on the least signs of life in intellectual life, particularly in Catholic institutions.

What was the "Revolution"? It is when Catholics openly decided not to "receive" (i.e. ratify with "religious assent") fiats from the hierarchy that they found unreasonable, unworkable, and out of touch with reality. The hierarchy still hasn't gotten the message that if the Church (the faithful) doesn't "receive" a teaching (i.e. the believers don't believe it), it can't reflect the "sense of the faithful" no matter how the Vatican invokes infallibility of either the ordinary or papal magisterium. The Vatican doesn't get it that they're function should be to express what the believers who are the Church believe, not tell them what they should believe based on some theoretical neo-scholastic theology and 13th century concepts that ignore everything humanity has learned about itself since.

Greeley's Catholics who stay because they like being Catholic are the ones the Revolution worked for because they've got a compatible or likeable Catholic cultural milieu to fit into. Those who don't, have little reason to stay.
Dakora
Will try to put everything he has written on my Kindle except for mystery novels. Admire his outlook and keen wit.
Jugore
In the 1960s, Andrew Greeley was often accused of never having had an unpublished thought. Following his inordinate number of novels, we can now add that he hasn't had an unpublished fantasy. This scattered and strangely dated book envisions a kind of fantasy revolution in an American Catholicism where lay people can be holier than priests (no kidding) even though most of them scoff at strictures against birth control and even abortion, where the biggest problem seems to be that someone removed the statues from the sanctuary of the parish church while failing to appreciate how movies like "Dogma" improve on 2,000 years of theological reflection. He seems to think it objectively true that guitar players are all terrible musicians (take THAT, Les Paul) while all organ players are virtuosos.

He has identified a class of Catholics called "liturgists," whose passionate aim is to strip worship of anything beautiful and everything ancient while replacing it with a pimply-faced folk singer thoroughly versed in his three guitar chords and three hundred heinous hymns which parishioners listen to because they are polite.

He does mention in passing that the new authoritarianism and dogmatism are having an effect but seems oblivious to the fact that those reactionary forces, the ones that elected our new Pope, are spiraling out of control as politicians are denied communion for upholding the law of the land and the priest-pedophile scandal is rapidly morphing into a combination cover-up and gay-bashing frenzy.

Greely is coming out with a book that purports to explain the mystery of the recent papal election. I hope his big issue is not the poor color coordination of Benedict XVI's liturgical vestments.
Cordann
Fr. Greeley has finally written a book that pretty well says it all, with the exception of one sentence. Hans Kung contrary to Fr.Greeley's opinion is "not" a celebrity theologian. Infact its uncanny how many of Fr.Greeley's observations resemble what Hans Kung has already written about in previous books, going back as far as the 80's.
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