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The Creed: What Christians Believe and Why It Matters ePub download

by Luke Timothy Johnson

  • Author: Luke Timothy Johnson
  • ISBN: 0232525218
  • ISBN13: 978-0232525212
  • ePub: 1705 kb | FB2: 1335 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: World
  • Publisher: Darton Longman and Todd (September 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 452
  • Format: azw lit lrf doc
The Creed: What Christians Believe and Why It Matters ePub download

In "The Creed, Luke Timothy Johnson, a New Testament scholar and Catholic theologian, clarifies the . This book is perfect for anyone who wants to learn what Christians believe now and what they have believed since the early Church times.

In "The Creed, Luke Timothy Johnson, a New Testament scholar and Catholic theologian, clarifies the history of the creed, discussing its evolution from the first decades of the Christian Church to the present day. By connecting the deep theological conflicts of the early Church with the conflicts and questions facing Christians today, Johnson shows that faith is a dynamic process, not based on a static set of rules. Also, if you want to better understand the Creed which is recited every Sunday in church, this is an excellent read.

In The Creed, Luke Timothy Johnson, a New Testament scholar and Catholic theologian, clarifies the history of the creed, discussing its evolution from the first decades of the Christian Church to the present day. By connecting the deep theological conflicts of the early Church. Written in a clear, graceful style and appropriate for Christians of all denominations, The Creed is destined to become a classic of modern writings on spirituality.

Luke Timothy Johnson (born November 20, 1943) is an American New Testament scholar and historian of early Christianity

Luke Timothy Johnson (born November 20, 1943) is an American New Testament scholar and historian of early Christianity. He is the Robert W. Woodruff Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at Candler School of Theology and a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University.

Luke Timothy Johnson does a superb job describing the history and early function of the Nicene Creed, then he skillfully produces compelling arguments for modern day functions of the Creed for all Christians who confess Christ as Lord

Luke Timothy Johnson does a superb job describing the history and early function of the Nicene Creed, then he skillfully produces compelling arguments for modern day functions of the Creed for all Christians who confess Christ as Lord. Although it may be a bit idealistic of me, I think The Creed could potentially close the gap that formed in the Church as a result of the Protestant Reformation. A must read for all Christians who believed Jesus wanted unity in his body when he prayed in John 17.

4 Luke Timothy Johnson former Benedictine monk Robert W. Woodruff Professor of New Testament at Candler School of Theology, Emory University. 6 We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church. We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins. We look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come. 7 Introduction A Scandal of Appearance To recite the Creed requires us to overcome many Scandals of Appearance: Faith involves perceiving the unseen in what can be seen.

Luke Timothy Johnson, former Benedictine monk, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of New Testament at Candler . IntroductionThe Son of God and the Father, Earlier Creeds spent much less time trying to describe the precise relationship between Jesus and God the Father. We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ,, the only Son of God,, eternally begotten of the Father,, God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God,, begotten, not made, of one Being with the Father. Through him all things were made. For example in Hippolytus’ (170-235 AD) Apostolic Tradition:, Do you believe in God the Father almighty?,

Think of Luke Timothy Johnson's The Creed as a user's manual.

Think of Luke Timothy Johnson's The Creed as a user's manual. But Johnson, who teaches at Emory University's Candler School of Theology, was part of the wave of Catholic thinkers that, in the wake of Vatican II, rejected the church's old emphasis on faith as merely giving assent to propositions.

Luke Timothy Johnson Luke Timothy Johnson (2007). The Creed: What Christians Believe and Why it Matters, . 6, Image. Mind, Heart, Profession.

Luke Timothy Johnson. As a human being, the way Jesus responded to God in faithful obedience and gave his life in service to other humans-is the pattern for all authentic humanity renewed by the Spirit of God. Luke Timothy Johnson. Luke Timothy Johnson (2007). 4. It is a form of generational narcissism to change texts to suit one's own needs. 5, Image. Needs, Suits, Narcissism.

Luke Timothy Johnson: "Early Christians and Gentile Religion: A New Approach" - Продолжительность: 1:16:40 Tulane . Why Bible Typography Matters - Продолжительность: 47:41 Mark Ward Recommended for you. 47:41

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This thoughtful, fully accessible exploration of the creed, the list of beliefs central to the Christian faith, delves into its origins and illuminates the contemporary significance of why it still matters.During services in Christian communities, the members of the congregation stand together to recite the creed, professing in unison the beliefs they share. For most Christians, the creed functions as a sort of �ABC� of what it means to be a Christian and to be part of a worldwide movement. Few people, however, know the source of this litany of beliefs, a topic that is further confused by the fact that there are two different versions: the Apostle�s Creed and the Nicene Creed. In The Creed, Luke Timothy Johnson, a New Testament scholar and Catholic theologian, clarifies the history of the creed, discussing its evolution from the first decades of the Christian Church to the present day. By connecting the deep theological conflicts of the early Church with the conflicts and questions facing Christians today, Johnson shows that faith is a dynamic process, not based on a static set of rules. Written in a clear, graceful style and appropriate for Christians of all denominations, The Creed is destined to become a classic of modern writings on spirituality.
Hilarious Kangaroo
I belong to a liturgical church and have known the Nicene Creed since I was a little girl in church listening to the grown ups recite the words. I think Mr. Johnson did a wonderful job exploring the background of the words and intent of those words, the history behind the words. What can never be explained, of course, is the feeling, the knowledge, the sense of correctness one feels when one, in church or alone, recites these words. The Nicene Creed is the holy history of the Christian.

The author, Luke Timothy Johnson, does a great job of making the Creed accessable to those folks not raised with the Nicene Creed and gives some moments of reflection to those of us who were.
Anen
This is a very well written scripturally and historically based explanation of every statement of faith recited in the Nicene Creed. Johnson explicates not only the meaning and significance of the belief elements of the Creed, but also the scriptural history and the early Christian church history of why and how each statement came to be selected for this fundamental document of Christian faith.

I particularly appreciate how the author captures the modern Christian mind, especially in its frequent failure to concentrate on the meaning of the words we recite at each Mass celebration. His honesty here is humbling and encouraging, making the reading of his book an especially rewarding experience. He acknowledges the challenge to faith the Creed represents while explaining its richness and clarifying as much as humanly possible the nature of the triune God that Christians are called upon to worship and obey. Many sections of the book also capture the marvelous phenomenon that was the vigorous growth of the Church so soon after the ignominious death on the cross of its Founder.

This work is a treat for the restimulation of a Christian faith that might be languishing from years of neglect or thoughtless habit and routine. I highly recommend it.
Connorise
Great resource that breaks down the Nicene Creed and gives an explanation of each component. If I remember correctly, Johnson is from the Catholic faith tradition, but he really does a great job leaving out sectarian bias. HE STICKS TO THE SCRIPTURES AND ITS THEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE! I highly recommend it to anyone trying to gain more theological insight (with a bit of historical information) on the Nicene Creed. It is very accessible and not bogged down with a lot of "hard-to-understand" theological terminology.
in waiting
Much of this book resounded with something that I've known and felt but could not put into words. As a result, I would now describe myself as a creedal or confessional Christian, but as the author points out; living out The Creed is the real challenge to those who recite it. The Nicene Creed's ability to put boundaries but not borders on our faith is one of its greatest strengths.
Rit
Timely explanation of Christianity's statement of faith in our post-modern and post-Christian times

For someone who grew up in a neo-Protestant denomination, where the Nicene-Constantinople Creed (or any other) have never been mentioned (from the pulpit or during Sunday School), I found this read not only enlightening but also upbuilding for my faith.

While I have to say there are a few statements that Luke Timothy Johnson makes without providing any evidence (and which I would like to challenge), this read is not a light read and neither a dry one. The first chapter briefly discusses the history of the early Christian creeds. The rest of the book is a treatise and explanation of every sentence, phrase, or words found in the Nicene-Constantinoplean creed. There are sub-chapters that are full of wisdom, and many of them are replete with Bible verses and quotations. While Dr. Johnson comes from a Roman-Catholic tradition, his writing is very Protestant and Orthodox friendly, and for that matter Heathen or non-believer friendly.

This book is perfect for anyone who wants to learn what Christians believe now and what they have believed since the early Church times. Also, if you want to better understand the Creed which is recited every Sunday in church, this is an excellent read. The only companion in this subtopic (Christian Creeds) that I would recommend is "Credo: Historical and Theological Guide to Creeds and Confessions of Faith in the Christian Tradition" by Jaroslav Pelikan.
Mash
This is the book for those who want to learn more about the Nicene Creed. Luke Timothy Johnson explains the meaning and history behind the words many Christians recite each Sunday. I highly recommend this book for Christians who want a deeper understanding of what they believe and for non-Christians who would like to understand what Christians believe and why. It is wonderfully written and brings the Nicene Creed to life.
Thetath
Regardless of your faith tradition, The Creed is a book worth exploring, studying, and discussing in your church. Agreement with Johnson's arguments and conclusions is not necessary -- it is the questions that Johnson raises that are important. Contemporary Christianity suffers a monumental credibility problem and identity crisis. Few Christians can clearly articulate what they believe, why it is important, and what ultimate meaning it has for their lives. Rigid fundamentalism to anything-goes liberalism paint a wide spectrum for confused seekers. Church-goers often simply go through the motions, mouthing professions of faith that have little or no meaning in their daily lives. Johnson calls all Christian believers to take seriously what we claim to believe, and he challenges us to act counter-culturally -- first and foremost by defining ourselves in relationship to community, rather than as individuals. This is a fine historical review as well as a clarion call to create a future grounded in a clear, compelling identity that says once and for all who we are, what we believe, and why we are here.
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