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Christian Origins: A People's History Of Christianity, Vol. 1 ePub download

by Richard A. Horsley

  • Author: Richard A. Horsley
  • ISBN: 080063411X
  • ISBN13: 978-0800634117
  • ePub: 1686 kb | FB2: 1555 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: World
  • Publisher: Fortress Pr (February 28, 2006)
  • Pages: 318
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 363
  • Format: lrf rtf txt rtf
Christian Origins: A People's History Of Christianity, Vol. 1 ePub download

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Christian Origins book.

Christian Origins" provides a well-written portrayal of ordinary people's history, focusing on various aspects of life.

Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Christian Origins" provides a well-written portrayal of ordinary people's history, focusing on various aspects of life. By reading "Christian Origins" individuals would get a greater appreciation for the Church's history and the Scripture itself.

A People's History of Christianity 1. Minneapolis: Fortress. Eugene, OR: Cascade Books. Publications by Richard A. Horsley by year. Pages 23-46 in Christian Origins. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2005. 1976 Horsley, Richard A. Pneumatikos vs. Psychikos: Distinctions of Spiritual Status among the Corinthians.

The Paraclete Mani as the Apostle of Jesus Christ and the Origins of a New Christian Church. By Nicholas Hope September 1998 · The Journal of Modern History.

The history of Christianity concerns the Christian religion, Christendom, and the Church with its various denominations, from the 1st century to the present. Christianity originated with the ministry of Jesus in the 1st century Roman province of Judea

Richard A. Horsley, Christian Origins: A Peoples History Of Christianity, Vol. 1ISBN .

Richard A. 1ISBN: 080063411X 2003 EPUB 318 pages 5 MBDealing with a time when Christians were moving towards separation from the movements Jewish origins, this inaugural volume of A Peoples History of Christianity tells . .

Shop our inventory for Christian Origins, Volume 1 by Richard A. Horsley with fast free shipping on every used book we have in stock! . Dealing with a time when "Christians" were moving towards separation from the movement's Jewish origins, this inaugural volume of A People's History of Christianity tells "the people's story" by gathering together evidence from the New Testament texts, archaeology, and other contemporary sources. Of particular interest to the distinguished group of are the often overlooked aspects of the earliest "Christian" consciousness: How, for example, did they manage to negotiate allegiances to two social groups?

Similar books to Christian Origins, Volume 1 (People's History of Christianity). Christian Origins" offers a refreshing look at the history of early Christianity.

Similar books to Christian Origins, Volume 1 (People's History of Christianity). Richard A. Horsley is Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and the Study of Religion at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He is the author of The Message and the Kingdom (2002 with Neil Asher Siberman), Jesus and the Spiral of Violence (1992), and Jesus and the Empire (2002). The book provides view of the past from "below," portraying the life of the poor and the world they lived in.

CHRISTIANITY During the tumultuous period of world history from 1660 to.History of the Christian Church, Volume I: Apostolic Christianity.

CHRISTIANITY During the tumultuous period of world history from 1660 to 1815, fronted Cambridge. The Cambridge History of Christianity, Volume 3: Early Medieval Christianities c. 600. 876 Pages·2010·5. 89 MB·4,687 Downloads. The Cambridge History Of Christianity, Vol. 4, Christianity In Western Europe 1100–1500. 31 MB·15,449 Downloads. resource for scholars and students alike. This volume of The Cambridge Hist. The Limits of Organic Life in Planetary Systems. On Becoming Baby Wise: Giving Your Infant the Gift of Nighttime Sleep.

This first volume in A People's History of Christianity covers a period of time roughly from the turn of the . Horsley explains two contrasts that will help readers to understand what "people's history" is.

This first volume in A People's History of Christianity covers a period of time roughly from the turn of the first century CE. to the middle of the second century CE. The contributors are scholars who are well known for their social-historical studies of the New Testament and early Christianity. First, he contrasts "people's history" and "standard history" (5). Whereas standard history focuses on elites and political events, people's history focuses on all aspects of the lives of the non-elite majority.

Dealing with a time when "Christians" were moving towards separation from the movement's Jewish origins, this inaugural volume of A People's History of Christianity tells "the people's story" by gathering together evidence from the New Testament texts, archaeology, and other contemporary sources. Of particular interest to the distinguished group of scholar-contributors are the often overlooked aspects of the earliest "Christian" consciousness: How, for example, did they manage to negotiate allegiances to two social groups? How did they deal with crucial issues of wealth and poverty? What about the participation of slaves and women in these communities? How did living in the shadow of the Roman Empire color their religious experience and economic values?
Urtte
"Christian Origins" offers a refreshing look at the history of early Christianity. The book provides view of the past from "below," portraying the life of the poor and the world they lived in. "Christian Origins" is a must-read for any Christian, ranging from a seminary student to a new believer, and even an atheist.

In contrast to many popular history books that focus on elites and political events, "Christian Origins" focuses on ordinary people and their lives. The book includes collection of essays divided into three parts: Early Jesus Movement, Cities and Texts, and Social Patterns and Practices. The book includes essay such as, "Why Peasants Responded to Jesus," "Conflicts in at Corinth," "Matthew's People," "The Gospel of John as People's History." "Disciplining the Hope of the Poor in Ancient Rome," "Eyes Have It: Slaves in the Community of Christ-Believers," and "Prophets, Prophetic Movements, and the Voices of Women." Essays on the Gospel of John and Matthew and on the Church in Corinth are especially worth reading, because they specifically focus on the socio-economic aspects and religious practices of the New Testament Christians.

The authors do a splendid job reconstructing history from "below," depicting the daily lives, culture, society, religious practices, and beliefs of ordinary people. People are presented in their own circumstances. The writers also portray people's actions and reactions to the world they live in. Of note, the majority of "ordinary people" were the poor; not the kind of poor we think of today, but the kind of poor who live just at or below the subsistence level. Other works fail to consider the significance of the poor, but "Christian Origins" gives the poor main priority.

Although it might seem that "Christian Origins" provides a one-sided view of the past, the book provides a more complete and refreshing approach to history. Many historians depict the Church's history by focusing on the rulers (kings and popes) and their contributions, Saints, political events and wars, and famous theologians. However, by only studying the past from "above" one does not get an adequate picture of history. Of course, I do not suggest one should abandon other approaches to history, but he or she should supplement them with "Christian Origins."

The authors are successful in bringing the audience into the world of early "Christians." People get a glimpse of what it means to live during the time of Jesus and be a disciple of Jesus. The early believers were part of Judaism, who lived within the Roman Empire. Their life and practices were shaped and influenced by both the Jewish and the Roman cultures. Understanding to society in which Jesus and the New Testament writers lived is crucial to understanding the context of the Holy Scriptures. A person cannot fully understand the Holy Bible, if she or he does not study its history (and its the overall context).

"Christian Origins" provides a well-written portrayal of ordinary people's history, focusing on various aspects of life. By reading "Christian Origins" individuals would get a greater appreciation for the Church's history and the Scripture itself. The authors use plain language to illustrate the world of the first Christians, which makes it pleasure to read.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn about beginning of the Christian faith and get a glance into the lives and practices of the first believers. You will not be disappointed by purchasing this book.
Wizard
The bookstore guru at our church showed this title to me a few months ago, and we decided to do a summer study of the book at our church. As a researcher and professor (in education and addiction) I thoroughly enjoy reading decently supported hypotheses and points of view, rather than the dry research standard of the "nearly proven" and "facts." The book has made for fascinating reading, lively discussion, and a great deal of outside research on materials that we were not finding to our liking! Fun, exciting, fresh, interesting, and yes, quite inaccurate from time to time, but we didn't pick it as a research based memorization project, but rather for the provocative points of view within. If you want to learn a great deal about early christianies (yes, plural and small "c"), this is the place to go. As there are 7 books in the series, this will probably be the first of a set of 7 reading clubs spread out over seven summers. I cannot recommend this highly enough for discussion groups. If your background is strictly fundamentalist, this may not be to your liking at all, definitely not material for someone with the King James only point of view, if this is where you are coming from, you would be best served by reading some of the content online before making a purchase decision.
Visonima
This is a great introduction to the New Testament and questions the faithful student and reader should raise. Well written and informative. The offereings by different researchers and commentators adds perspective to the people and times of the New Testament origins.
Reemiel
Haven't they dominated center stage long enough?
By Kevin Hrebik, MAR, MDiv (in process)

Having been significantly impressed with the book as a whole, it came as a surprise to read other basically negative reviews, especially to claim insufficient premise support. Granted, no book will ever please everyone, but what book claims to? By the same token, what perspective is all-encompassing? Even the Bible is criticized for not being a science book or a history book, but neither of these is its purpose (although it contradicts no real science or real history, i.e., micro-evolution portending macro-evolution and thus being junk science, putting theory ahead of fact). That the authors chose to explore the relatively young and still undeveloped social and literary science of a "people's perspective" is to make an a priori case for their not being able to speak simultaneously and with equal weight to all standard perspectives, or to possess incontestable evidence.

It seemed the critics were somewhat patronizing and arguably illustrated the thesis of the commendably creative seven-volume series, that the vast preponderance of history has been written from the "top down", from the perspective and perpetuation of the elite view, assiduously capturing only the key people, events and "major tradition". A "bottom up" view of history, thus the subtitle, "A People's History..." written from the "minor tradition" and encompassing much harder to find nuances, requiring incomparably greater research and analysis, and some necessary speculation, is not only welcome but sorely needed. Most average scholars can access and comment on the public record, but reading "across the grain" and between the lines, adducing the reasons behind the great proclamations, discerning the purposes of the documented material, and interpolating the causes of the official records requires an applaudable, even heroic drilling into the silenced, forgotten and often unnamed masses.

Other than what we glean from occasional, dramatic Hollywood efforts, who among us ever thinks about what life really was like in 1st century Greco-Roman times for the commoners, peasants, main streeters and average Joe's who shadowed Jesus like groupies? Or in the 2nd and 3rd centuries following his death and resurrection, when they labored to gain converts in a world more hostile than any of us will ever know? Are the non-elite and non-status masses really irrelevant to a comprehensive awareness and education of the history of Christianity--or is the top down view sufficient? What rare person analyzes parables from the vantage point of the "least among them"--or is only one historical perspective germane? One critic appealed to Rowan Williams, current Archbishop of Canterbury, as having a legitimate grasp on the genre of history, yet in his "Why Study the Past?" (2005, Grand Rapids: Eardman's), Williams is hardly a stranger to invention. His essential premise is to see all of history cast in a shroud of "strangeness," from which too many take too much certainty. His view is that only with the eyes of faith can we hope to clear the fog, and that only true believers can hope to peer through the unknowable into the lives of other believers experiencing the same Christ. If Williams' interpretive license, an "insider's view" so to speak, at once creative, novel and fresh, is wholly legitimate, why not a serious, multi-volume contribution to the relatively new "bottom up" view?

Regarding ancient history, the mass of the preserved and unearthed record that has been passed down through the centuries has been critical for the normal, established top-down view--one that also is as old and as tired as the hills. Not to say this is necessarily bad, because it is still both informative and instructive, but when others have uncovered something intrinsically valuable, a new tradition, a breath of fresh air, perhaps the fledgling genre should be given a little room to develop, and not immediately pounced on as not fulfilling all the established, normalized requirements of suitable historical documentation. Surely, as more join the effort, the new "bottom up" historical tradition will continue to be explored by the gamut of professions and generations of new thinkers. In this set alone, more than 100 contributed to the cause. Perhaps those well educated in old school history could lend a helping hand in weak areas instead of arms length, aristocratic-like condescension.

The critics complain of theories not being sufficiently well founded but the authors freely admit that obstacles abound, and supporting material is problematic in many ways (see especially Chapter Six, Warren Carter's "Matthew's People"), thus reinforcing the thesis that it is long overdue to make a credible and concerted effort to imagine and discover what went on behind the great elite historical tradition.

This writer for one was inspired by the upside down from normal interpretation of the parable of the rich man and Lazarus from Luke 16:19-31 (pp. 58-62). It was not a stretch at all to buy into the theory that virtually all of the peasants and poor, comprising 95% of the population, simply were sick and tired of being harshly dominated and unable to get ahead from triple taxation (Rome, Herod, Priests), and cheered at the idea of a just reversal of fortunes for a piggish rich man, now at the mercy of a poor man. A people's view of Jesus' parables offers previously hidden insights, and is not a threat to the standard interpretation (justice will prevail). Is there anything new to learn from it? And if yes, have not the authors succeeded at their task? Moreover, if we either cannot or do not learn anything new from the past, indeed as per Williams, why study it? Changing our vantage point for Jesus' parables is not only good Bible but great application--Jesus deliberately chose his words for specific reasons, in this case to help the poor masses relate and "get it", and his ultimate point is hardly the only lesson.

At the same time, much "big tradition" fact is incorporated in the view that oppressed peasants birthed the impetus of the various grassroots rebellions (pp. 24-30), which mushroomed into actual revolts, for these well-documented revolts did not materialize overnite. Non-status peasants simply do not rise up against a crushing, infinitely more powerful hierarchy for no reason--thus, "What pervasive, inherent, cumulative social/cultural/political factors contributed to their actions?" is as valid a question to investigate as any other; and more interesting reading than who led the revolt, what year it was crushed, how many were killed, and Rome's follow-up punishments. As well, to put readers in the well-worn sandals of the oppressed who heard Jesus' language like accessing the "kingdom of heaven" and becoming "children of the King" as immensely appealing--is not to rewrite eschatology or theology but to make the point of how and why the throngs followed him, how and why they dared to populate rebellions, and ultimately how and why they willingly faced death for their new faith. This is a view neither as empathetically nor as eloquently captured in standard history books.

If all you want is another top-down historical series hitting all the proper notes with all the proper documentation (perhaps even romanticizing Rome's brutish emperors), then by all means stay with the safe and predictable--there are certainly plenty of them. But if you want to step outside the box, are willing to be stretched a little, and can be obliged to see some new sights and new terrain, even if you don't agree with everything the tour guide suggests, consider this fresh, creative and for this reader at least, highly inspirational book. Who knows, you might even find--gasp!--some humor in history (for just one prime example, there is much remarkable and subtle humor in "The Cult of the Martyrs" by Vasiliki Limberis in the 3rd volume of the series, Byzantine Christianity). The elite and imperial aristocrats of the ancient world, both secular and Christian, have never been quite as important in the eyes of the populace and laity as they have been in their own, and neither have their best fans, their historians. Haven't the lot of them dominated center stage long enough?
Tejora
An excellent cross-reference to another view of diffeent areas of Christianity especially in the early church.
Bolanim
Arrived within 5 days of ordering and was in perfect condition. Could not have done better at a book store!
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