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Christianizing the Roman Empire: A.D. 100-400 ePub download

by Ramsay MacMullen

  • Author: Ramsay MacMullen
  • ISBN: 0300036426
  • ISBN13: 978-0300036428
  • ePub: 1486 kb | FB2: 1196 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: World
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (1984)
  • Pages: 183
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 349
  • Format: lrf mobi rtf txt
Christianizing the Roman Empire: A.D. 100-400 ePub download

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Christianizing the Roman Empire book. This is Ramsay MacMullen’s thesis as presented in his book, Christianizing the Roman Empire: . While, at times, MacMullen’s book may What we can no longer see, we cannot report.

This item:Christianizing the Roman Empire: . Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). The first two chapters may cause some sincere readers to give up on the book before they have an opportunity to enjoy its valuable contribution. Despite its shortcomings, I would highly recommend Christianizing the Roman Empire to those with a high interest in learning more about this period of Roman and church history.

Page iii Christianizing the Roman Empire (. 100–400) RAMSAY MacMULLEN. This book may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, in any form (beyond that copying permitted by Sections 107 and 108 of the . YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS New Haven and London <. Designed by Nancy Ovedovitz and set in Bembo Roman by Eastern Graphics.

When MacMullen was honored for a lifetime of scholarly achievement at the 2001 annual meeting of the American Historical Association with the Award for Scholarly . Christianizing the Roman Empire: AD 100-400 (1984).

When MacMullen was honored for a lifetime of scholarly achievement at the 2001 annual meeting of the American Historical Association with the Award for Scholarly Distinction, the award citation called him "the greatest historian of the Roman Empire alive today. With important new books published in 2006 and 2009 and 2011 at the ages of 78 and 81 and 83, he remains a powerful voice for scholarly accuracy and lucidity among students of the Roman world. Soldier and Civilian in the Later Roman Empire (1963) Non-military life of the legions.

Christianizing the Roman Empire: . By: Ramsay MacMullen

Christianizing the Roman Empire: . By: Ramsay MacMullen. Yale University Press, 1986, Paperback. MacMullen's provocative conclusion is that mass conversions to Christianity were based more on the appeal of miracle or the opportunity for worldly advantages then simply on a 'rising tide of Christian piety. ▲. Title: Christianizing the Roman Empire: . 100-400 By: Ramsay MacMullen Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 184 Vendor: Yale University Press Publication Date: 1986.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. اليد الخفية: دراسات في الحركات اليهودية الهدامة والسرية.

How did the early Christian church manage to win its dominant place in the Roman world? In his newest book, an eminent historian of ancient Rome examines this question from a secular-rather than an oint. MacMullen’s provocative conclusion is that mass conversions to Christianity were based more on the appeal of miracle or the opportunity for worldly advantages than simply on a rising tide of Christian piety. Provocative to the Christian religious scholar and the nonreligious historian alike.

Christianizing the Roman Empire: (. The subject of this book is something that happened to pagans, of course, and to the Roman Empire, not to the church and the Christians. Published by: Yale University Press. MacMullen's style is lucid, and the story of a period with its own innate interest is narrated with compelling feeling. The latter are already converted. It is in the non-Christian world where the action lies that chiefly interests me: the action of coming over.

How did the early Christian church manage to win its dominant place in the Roman world? In his newest book, an eminent historian of ancient Rome examines this question from a secular―rather than an ecclesiastical―viewpoint. MacMullen’s provocative conclusion is that mass conversions to Christianity were based more on the appeal of miracle or the opportunity for worldly advantages than simply on a “rising tide of Christian piety.”“Provocative to the Christian religious scholar and the nonreligious historian alike. . . . MacMullen’s style is lucid, and the story of a period with its own innate interest is narrated with compelling feeling. . . . It is an important book, and highly recommended for the general reader of history as well as the Christian who wonders how the ‘Jesus movement’ came, by Constantine’s time, to be the church we know―Choice“Written in a fresh and vigorous style, . . . [this book] offers an admirable survey of some major aspects of the history [of the early Christian church].”―Robert M. Grant, New York Times Book Review“Gently provocative. . . . MacMullen has written an instructive and enjoyable book on a great theme.”―Henry Chadwick, Times Literary Supplement“A carefully argued and well-written study.”―Jackson P. Hershbell, Library Journal
Malogamand
By reading this book, I learned a great deal about how the transformation of the Roman Empire from a pagan to a Christian culture took place. If a reader has this objective in mind it should be highly recommended. However, it isn't very entertaining so don't expect it to be. Assume you are in college and you are reading it for information to put in a term paper and you won't be disappointed.
Rocksmith
Ramsay MacMullen, the author of Christianizing the Roman Empire, is the Dunham Professor of History and Classics at Yale University. On January 5, of 2001 he was the recipient of a lifetime Award for Scholarly Distinction from the American Historical Association. The citation begins, "Ramsay MacMullen is the greatest historian of the Roman Empire alive today." Obviously the author is eminently qualified for his research for this work.

Christianity grew dramatically from the day of Pentecost to the year 400 through mass conversations. At the end of the first century, the church held a minimal significance in Roman society. It simply "did not count." Within three centuries it included ten percent of the population and had displaced the other religions of the empire. In Christianizing the Roman Empire MacMullen addresses the factors for this amazing growth. The author demonstrates that these mass conversions first came through the power of miracles and later through the social advantage of becoming a Christian. As such, MacMullen is diminishing the value of Christian piety and the testimony of martyrs as reasons for the mass evangelization.

The book is divided into two sections, which are the times prior to 312 and after 312 (Constantine's "conversion" in 312 and the Edict of Milan in 313). He first examines what Pagans of the culture believed. Then he looks at what Christians presented to the Pagans about this new faith, and how they presented it. The influence of Constantine is examined, as are the non-religious factors that led to conversions. MacMullen then looks at evangelical campaigns after 312, including the conversion of intellectuals. Finally he looks at the quality of the conversions and those that were won through coercion.

I found MacMullen's research and use of sources of the highest quality. The book contains forty-three pages of endnotes and commentary by the author about the endnotes. In addition, the biography is extensive and would be of great value for those desiring to do additional research on the subject. He uses many sources to verify his thesis that Christian miracles during the early years and favored advantage in the former years, rather than Christian love, piety, and courage in martyrdom, resulted in the dramatic growth of the church. MacMullen's research confirmed that Christianity becoming the Roman State religion strongly diluted the spiritual nature of the church.

Christianizing the Roman Empire is an outstanding work of research by an eminently qualified authority. I found the material fascinating. Some of it attacked my pre-conceived notions, while other aspects of the book confirmed my reasoned suspicions. The book is written for those who already have some knowledge and study in church history during this era in Rome. Though MacMullen obviously is writing this book to an educated audience, the writing style is not nearly as high quality as his research. The first two chapters may cause some sincere readers to give up on the book before they have an opportunity to enjoy its valuable contribution. Despite its shortcomings, I would highly recommend Christianizing the Roman Empire to those with a high interest in learning more about this period of Roman and church history.
LØV€ YØỮ
MacMullen adds the important observation that the ferocity of Christians towards non-Christians tends to be given little notice in accounts of the early church. The examples he adduces precede the conversion of Constantine only by a little while, so one may conclude that it was the sheer growth of the church, rather than its endorsement by the state, that began to corrupt it.
Burisi
This book very effectively goes through the historical inaccuracies most people are confronted with when discussing martyrdom in the roman empire and how the shift from a pagan society to a christian society occurred, as well as how the christians acted once they weren't the "persecuted" people anymore.
superstar
Ramsey MacMullen has much to offer contemporary scholarship on the much-discussed and always open-ended problem of Christianization in the Roman Empire. MacMullen systematically renders an insightful overview of the different transitions in the process of Christianization as follows: first the period from New Testament evangelism (as found in the Epistles and the Acts) to Constantine's conversion, and the period following after the emperor's conversion all the way to AD 407. MacMullen does not discount the more customary viewpoints held by scholars such as Edward Gibbon and J.B. Bury, or, for that matter, traditional ecclesiastical interpretation as well; he does add to them though; and this is his most remarkable feat. He manages to maintain a balance between the secular and the ecclesiastical, in turn offering food-for-thought for all readers. Ramsey MacMullen's work deserves praise and possible precedence even over the renowned scholar Peter Brown's works, which bear a similarity to R.M.'s but lack the same objectivity. While his style of prose is a bit unseasonable and skewed at times, the work, overall, will undoubtedly come as a relief and reward to anyone yet to be familiar with it.
Sermak Light
WHAT YOU'LL LEARN: In 100 AD Christianity was a minor cult, by 400 AD it was on it's way to converting the vast empire. How? Well, convincing the Emperor (Constantine, 312 AD) and being able to kill people who disagreed helped. But earlier, between 100 and 300, Christian miracle workers won converts. Martyrs were less common and less important than you'd think.
MacMullen had devoted a 40 year career to ancient Rome around this time. Every conclusion he draws is based on original ancient sources.
This book is based on non-Christian sources and looks at the early conversions as the ancient non-christians would have understood them. Highly recommended. And yes, it is hard to read.
Joony
It's got the facts, lacks the force to weave it into one common story. This book is about the alienness that Christianity in times of the Romans would be for us today: a religion of hell and missionary Dawkinian uppitiness, who madly killed the Gods, and convinced through faith healing and other chamanisms.

It's also about the alienness that Christianity was to the Pagans: mad deniers of the Holy, transhumanist affirmers of material resurrection and immortality, atheists but for one god.

A good try, but could be revised. Made more "narrative" like, if you will.
Read this first. Then read Rodney Stark's "Rise of Christianity".
These are quality books, in contrast to "There is a God" supposedly by Antony Flew but actually written by Roy Abraham Varghese (see my other review, and avoid paying for that book at all costs). I felt cheated by that book and the (real) author Varghese. The book is simply a polemic and feels completely dishonest.
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