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An Irreverent Curiosity: In Search of the Church's Strangest Relic in Italy's Oddest Town ePub download

by David Farley

  • Author: David Farley
  • ISBN: 1592404545
  • ISBN13: 978-1592404544
  • ePub: 1255 kb | FB2: 1125 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: World
  • Publisher: Gotham; 1st edition (July 9, 2009)
  • Pages: 304
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 254
  • Format: mbr lit txt lrf
An Irreverent Curiosity: In Search of the Church's Strangest Relic in Italy's Oddest Town ePub download

DAVID FARLEY's travel writing has appeared in The New York Times (including a feature on Calcata) . Thus, one can see why the book was called "An Irreverent Curiosity".

He teaches writing at New York University. However, I did not find the book irreverent at all. In all honestly, the author treated the topic with more maturity than I would have been able to do. However, while the main focus of the book was on the Holy Foreskin, this book was much more.

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An Irreverent Curiosity book. A tour through the centuries and through a bizarre Italian. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

In Chuck Palahniuk's book Choke, the main character is told that he was cloned from Jesus' foreskin. James Joyce's Ulysses has Stephen Dedalus pondering the Holy Prepuce while he urinates with Leopold Bloom, in the section titled "Ithaca.

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Автор: Farley David Название: An Irreverent Curiosity: In. .Ballerina kitten Mia is back in a seventh I Can Read Book by Robin Farley.

Ballerina kitten Mia is back in a seventh I Can Read Book by Robin Farley.

Read David Farley's posts on the Penguin Blog. Some postulated that it had been stolen by Satanists. Some said the priest himself was to blame. Some even pointed their fingers at the Vatican

The book was named one of the best travel books of the year by the Los Angeles Times and WorldHum. com and one of the best books of the decade by the Dubuque Telegraph Herald.

This series is perfect for fans of the Tallulah books.

Some postulated that it had been stolen by Satanists. This series is perfect for fans of the Tallulah books.

With almost blasphemous humor and wit, Farley sorts through all the history, legend, and town gossip from the small hilltop hamlet of Calcata

A tour through the centuries and through a bizarre Italian town in search of an unbelievable relic: the foreskin of Jesus Christ In December 1983, a priest in the Italian hill town of Calcata shared shocking news with his congregation: The pride of their town, the foreskin of Jesus, had been stolen. Some postulated that it had been stolen by Satanists. Some said the priest himself was to blame. Some even pointed their fingers at the Vatican. In 2006, travel writer David Farley moved to Calcata, determined to find the missing foreskin, or at least find out the truth behind its disappearance. Farley recounts how the relic passed from Charlemagne to the papacy to a marauding sixteenth-century German solider before finally ending up in Calcata, where miracles occurred that made the sleepy town a major pilgrimage destination. Over the centuries, as Catholic theology evolved, the relic came to be viewed as something of an embarrassment, culminating in a 1900 Church decree that allowed the parish to display it only on New Year's Day. An Irreverent Curiosity interweaves this history with the curious landscape of Calcata, a beautiful and untouched medieval village set atop four-hundred-fifty-foot cliffs, which now, due to the inscrutable machinations of Italian bureaucracy, is a veritable counterculture coven. Blending history, travel, and perhaps the oddest story in Christian lore, An Irreverent Curiosity is a weird and wonderful tale of conspiracy and misadventure.
Cargahibe
"When Halloween evening arrived, I put (the costume) all together, (including) my homemade cape, on which I had written SANTO PREPUZIO with a large Superman-style 'SP' underneath. Finally, I put on the brown ski cap, the color of which perfectly matched my brown turtleneck, rolled up the edges of the cap, and affixed a gold circle with the wire over my head." - the author goes to an Italian Halloween party dressed as the Holy Foreskin

Growing up Catholic, I was peripherally aware of the existence of holy relics though I never got too worked up about it. And certainly not to the obsessive degree admitted to by the author of AN IRREVERENT CURIOSITY, David Farley.

To make a long story short, Farley's narrative is an account of his extended stay in the medieval hill town of Calcata, 29 miles north of Rome, in which the Holy Foreskin, ostensibly circumcised from the infant Christ, made its appearance in 1527 and was subsequently venerated as a precious relic until its disappearance in 1983. David's self-imposed mission was to track the lost artifact down. A hobby is a good thing.

Most fascinating to me was Farley's history and description of the type of relics available for veneration by the pious in the Middle Ages subsequent to the death of Charlemagne in 814. Countless slivers of and nails from the True Cross, the breast milk, hair, comb, handkerchief and wedding ring of the Virgin Mary, St. Joseph's hammer and one of his carpentered carts that Jesus helped build, the Redeemer's tears, barbs from the Crown of Thorns, a preserved fish and stale bread from the miraculously enlarged picnic lunch used by Jesus to feed thousands, the very finger that Doubting Thomas stuck in the risen Christ's side, shards of marble from the pillar on which God's son was flogged, the sponge used to quench his thirst on the Cross, a chunk of the Last Supper's table, and JC's own sandals. And, of course, the Holy Foreskin. Several, in fact. The list is endless when one includes the alleged bits and pieces of the saints and martyrs left behind. One can only imagine the hand-rubbing glee felt by the Levantine flimflammers as they watched the suckers debarking from the long ships arrived from the ports of Western Europe.

The subtitle of AN IRREVERENT CURIOSITY is IN SEARCH OF THE CHURCH'S STRANGEST RELIC IN ITALY'S ODDEST TOWN. The town is, obviously, Calcata, and its history and inhabitants absorb much of the author's narrative; so much so that the main thread of the book - the hunt for the sacred relic - is sometimes obscured by all the textual padding. Of course, it's to be expected that the recorded experiences of a resident in foreign climes become focused on the eccentricities of the locals. One only need read the books of such expats as Peter Mayle (A Year in Provence), Annie Hawes (Extra Virgin: A Young Woman Discovers the Italian Riviera, Where Every Month Is Enchanted), and Victoria Twead (Chickens, Mules and Two Old Fools: Tuck into a slice of Andalucían Life); that's part of the fun.

And what degree of success did Farley have in his quest for the Holy Foreskin? Well, that would be telling, wouldn't it? Let it suffice to say that AN IRREVERENT CURIOSITY reminds me more than a little of Miracle Ball: My Hunt for the Shot Heard 'Round the World, in which author Brian Biegel recounts his search for the missing home run ball - a contemporary holy relic to some - socked into the bleachers by New York Giant Bobby Thomson to beat the Dodgers in the 1951 National League playoffs. Indeed, I'm tempted to award a similar number of stars - three. However, the interesting history lesson that David provides and his congeniality is such that I'll gladly ratchet the award up to four.

I'm left bemused, however, why Farley would sneak his 10-pound miniature pinscher/Chihuahua mix of a dog, Abraham Lincoln, into the Vatican's Sancta Sanctorum hidden in a shoulder bag. Is that ridiculous or what? Remind me to smuggle my favorite cat, Amanda, into Westminster Abbey next time I visit to examine tomb inscriptions.
Swordsong
First of all, I have to confess that, like the author, I am fascinated by the idea and history of relics - so that may bias me a little.

Basically this book recounts the author's search for the "lost" relic of the Holy Foreskin - the little piece of flesh cut of Christ's penis during his circumcision and venerated in many places in Europe up until the 20th century. Thus, one can see why the book was called "An Irreverent Curiosity".

However, I did not find the book irreverent at all. In all honestly, the author treated the topic with more maturity than I would have been able to do. However, while the main focus of the book was on the Holy Foreskin, this book was much more. It was also an account of everyday life in a small town of Italy filled with a variety of interesting characters who the author described in a way which made the reader feel like he was getting to know them (in person) as well. I think I found that aspect of the book - the study of the people and their relationships in this small town - very enjoyable.

Overall, I would definitely recommend this to individuals with an interest in relics (unless you are a "fundamentalist" when it comes to that topic) and to individuals who enjoy character studies of real people.

I think this author would be a fun guy to sit down and talk with in person over a cup of coffee or glass of wine ... which is essentially how you have to approach this book - as a conversation with an interesting fellow who is telling a great story about his experiences in a small town in Italy.
Uickabrod
This is an interesting, inconclusive search for a nebulous relic, at best. The quirky characters of Calcata, the history if the Catholic Church, and the picture of this tiny Italian village made it an entertaining read.
Walan
Extremely funny view of the plethora of relics mostly perpetuated by wishful thinking. Farley also brings the reader to a small area of Italy and limns its inhabitants in a memorable fashion.
Vertokini
How do you solve a mystery in a town you don't know the language, where everyone knows each other, and the most knowledgeable people would never talk to outsiders? David Farley makes a commendable effort to crack the 20-year-old case of the missing Holy Foreskin, and while doing so imparts a good feel of Italy, knowledge of the town of Calcata, a load of history, an insight into the bewildering New Age culture, and a whole lot of entertainment. This book was worth every penny. I would undoubtedly recommend it to everyone.

The only problem is that (spoilers! ---------) he leaves us facing a much deeper mystery than we had before, and only barely and accidentally cracks the surface of rumors and cover-ups surrounding this event. The asides made this book extremely enjoyable, but I can't help but think that another researcher, most likely a native Italian, needs to get to the bottom of this before all the chief figures involved with the theft/reclaiming/disappearance/whatever it was pass away.
Gardagar
I bought this book for my mom for Christmas and then borrowed it when she finished! I am huge fan of anything Italy and I really enjoyed the authors detail about life in a small Italian hill town. The whole concept of this book and the search for Jesus' foreskin was fun and made the book fun to read. There was a lots of history of the Catholic relegion and their holy relics in the story but the author did a great job of making it interesting, entertaining and easy to read. This was a great book and one I look forward to keeping in my collection.
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