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Holocaust Theology: A Reader ePub download

by Dan Cohn-Sherbok

  • Author: Dan Cohn-Sherbok
  • ISBN: 0859896242
  • ISBN13: 978-0859896245
  • ePub: 1198 kb | FB2: 1539 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: World
  • Publisher: University of Exeter Press (January 1, 2002)
  • Pages: 432
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 393
  • Format: mbr lit mobi rtf
Holocaust Theology: A Reader ePub download

Rabbi Dan Cohn-Sherbok has provided a much needed and indeed "panoramic survey of Holocaust theology" . Holocaust Theology: A Reader provides a fine, comprehensive overview of the interpretive possibilities.

Rabbi Dan Cohn-Sherbok has provided a much needed and indeed "panoramic survey of Holocaust theology" (1) that offers a comprehensive overview of excerpts from representative writings in the field. Journal of the American Academy of Religion. This anthology does indeed offer a panoramic survey, and thus is a valuable contribution to Holocaust literature.

Holocaust Theology book.

Holocaust Theology: A Reader (Paperback). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. "Holocaust Theology: A Reader should prove useful as an introductory text which grapples with complex issues. SHOFAR ""This anthology does indeed offer a panoramic survey, and thus is a valuable contribution to Holocaust literature.

Dan Mark Cohn-Sherbok is a rabbi of Reform Judaism and a Jewish theologian. He is Professor Emeritus of Judaism at the University of Wales

Dan Mark Cohn-Sherbok is a rabbi of Reform Judaism and a Jewish theologian. He is Professor Emeritus of Judaism at the University of Wales. Born in Denver, Colorado, he graduated from East High School (Denver) and was a student at Williams College, Massachusetts, spending a junior year abroad in Athens, Greece. He was ordained a Reform rabbi at the Hebrew Union College at Cincinnati. He was a Chaplain of the Colorado House of Representative, and Honorary Colonel Aide-de-Camp of New Mexico

Book Theology: A Reader.

Book Theology: A Reader. New York University Press.

Rabbi Professor Dan Cohn-Sherbok has a P.

This book is thus designed to provide a panoramic survey of Holocaust theology-throughout I have selected representative . The book begins in Part I with an exploration of the religious challenge posed by the Holocaust.

This book is thus designed to provide a panoramic survey of Holocaust theology-throughout I have selected representative passages from over one hundred important Jewish and Christian thinkers. While this study is not exhaustive, it nonetheless aims to offer a representative sample of material drawn from over fifty years of religious reflection. After each reading I have included several questions to stimulate discussion and debate. The first reading is from After Auschwitz published.

Dan Cohn-Sherbok is a rabbi of Reform Judaism, a Jewish theologian and a prolific author on religion.

Holocaust Theology - A Reader School Lehigh University. Throughout this book I attempted to demonstrate that all these attempts to come to terms with the Holocaust suffer from numerous defects. In the bibliography I listed the major works published by these writers as well as other books and articles dealing with the Holocaust. Subsequently, this study was republished as God and the Holocaust, and the bibliography was expanded to include important works by a range of Christian thinkers.

Cohn-Sherbok's section on Jewish-Christian dialogue contains useful selections and reveals a wide range of thinking on the topic.

New York: New York University Press, 2002. The book itself is divided into four interconnected parts: "The Religious Challenge of the Holocaust," "Faith in the Death Camps," "Wrestling with the Holocaust," and "Jews, Christians and the Holocaust. Each excerpt is followed by two questions based on the reading. Cohn-Sherbok's section on Jewish-Christian dialogue contains useful selections and reveals a wide range of thinking on the topic. Concerning post-Auschwitz Christian and Jewish theology, he correctly notes that a "shift from the absolutism of the past" has "radical and far-reaching" implications.

Where was God when six million died? Over the last few decades this question has haunted both Jewish and Christian theologians. If God is all-good and all-powerful, how could he have permitted the Holocaust to take place?
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Yellow Judge
I liked that the book represented many different perspectives on the holocaust from many famous rabbis and other learned people. It was a godsend for writing my paper on theodicy.
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