Rome ePub download

by Robert Hughes

  • Author: Robert Hughes
  • ISBN: 0753823055
  • ISBN13: 978-0753823057
  • ePub: 1989 kb | FB2: 1600 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Phoenix (April 1, 2012)
  • Pages: 416
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 236
  • Format: azw mbr docx txt
Rome ePub download

Rome Robert Hughes ALSO BY ROBERT HUGHES The Art of Australia (1966) Heaven and Hell in Western Art (1969) The Shock of the New (1980) The Fatal Shore (1987).

Rome Robert Hughes ALSO BY ROBERT HUGHES The Art of Australia (1966) Heaven and Hell in Western Art (1969) The Shock of the New (1980) The Fatal Shore (1987). Published in the United States by Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House, In. New York, and in Canada by Random House of Canada Limited, Toronto. Knopf, Borzoi Books, and the colophon are registered trademarks of Random House, Inc. English translation of Giuseppi Belli’s L’illuminazione de la cuppola courtesy of Anthony Merlino. eISBN: 978-0-307-70058-2.

Robert Studley Forrest Hughes AO (28 July 1938 – 6 August 2012) was an Australian-born art critic, writer, and producer of television documentaries. His best seller The Fatal Shore (1986) is a study of the British penal colonies and early history of Australia. He was described in 1997 by Robert Boynton of The New York Times as "the most famous art critic in the world.

Although book is a biography of Rome, it is also an acutely written historical essay informed by his wide-ranging knowledge of. The Economist "Robert Hughes couldn't have chosen a better subject for himself than Rome. His cultural history of the city is superb.

The Economist "Robert Hughes couldn't have chosen a better subject for himself than Rome. Hughes devours art-and Rome offers a feast worthy of his gargantuan appetites.

Rome was, as Hughes observes, the Thailand of the period, and he includes plenty of revealing stories about the .

What on earth did the locals make of these people? In his epilogue, Hughes, the modern cultural critic, elegantly savages the mass tourism and commercial culture of Berlusconi's Italy.

Robert Hughes, who has stunned us with comprehensive works on subjects as sweeping and complex as the history of Australia (The Fatal Shore), the modern art movement (The Shock of the New), the nature of American art (American Visions), and the nature of America itself as seen through its art (The Culture of Complaint), now. Turns his renowned critical eye to one of art historys most compelling, enigmatic, and important figures, Francisco Jos de Goya y Lucientes.

From Robert Hughes, one of the greatest art and cultural critics of our time, comes a sprawling, comprehensive, and deeply personal history of Rome-as city, as empire, and, crucially, as an origin of Western art and civilization.

From Robert Hughes, one of the greatest art and cultural critics of our time, comes a sprawling, comprehensive, and deeply personal history of Rome-as city, as empire, and, crucially, as an origin of Western art and civilization, two subjects about which Hughes has spent his life writing and thinking. Starting on a personal note, Hughes takes us to the Rome he first encountered as a hungry twenty-one-year-old fresh from Australia in 1959. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 1 нояб.

An extraordinary volume-even a masterpiece-about the early history of Australia that reads like the finest of novels. Hughes captures everything in this complex tableau with narrative finesse that drives the reader ever-deeper into specific facts and greater understanding. He presents compassionate understanding of the plights of colonists-both freemen and convicts-and the Aboriginal peoples they displaced. One of the very best works of history I have ever read.

Read Rome, by Robert Hughes online on Bookmate – From Robert Hughes, one of the greatest art and cultural critics of our time, comes a sprawling, comprehensive, and deeply personal history of Rome-a.

Read Rome, by Robert Hughes online on Bookmate – From Robert Hughes, one of the greatest art and cultural critics of our time, comes a sprawling, comprehensive, and deeply personal history of Rome-. From Robert Hughes, one of the greatest art and cultural critics of our time, comes a sprawling, comprehensive, and deeply personal history of Rome-as city, as empire, and, crucially, as an origin of Western art and civilization, two subjects about which Hughes has spent his life writing and thinking. Starting on a personal note, Hughes takes us to the Rome he first.

Author: Robert Hughes.

A dazzling biography of the Eternal City - 'A tour of the great city with a great guide: who could do this better?' EVENING STANDARD.For almost a thousand years, Rome held sway as the spiritual and artistic centre of the world. Hughes vividly recreates the ancient Rome of Julius Caesar, Marcus Aurelius, Nero, Caligula, Cicero, Martial and Virgil. With the artistic blossoming of the Renaissance, he casts his unwavering critical eye over the great works of Raphael, Michelangelo and Brunelleschi, shedding new light on the Old Masters. In the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when Rome's cultural predominance was assured, artists and tourists from all over Europe converged on the city. Hughes brilliantly analyses the defining works of Caravaggio, Velasquez, Rubens and Bernini.Hughes' Rome is a vibrant, contradictory, spectacular and secretive place; a monument both to human glory and human error. In equal parts loving, iconoclastic, enraged and wise, peopled with colourful figures and rich in unexpected details, ROME is an exhilarating journey through the story of one of the world's most glorious cities.
Narder
Robert Hughes' brilliant revelation of Imperial Rome as a complex world chiefly remembered for its art, the only thing that comes out of ancient Rome as an exemplar of beauty and truth, changed so much of what I thought of Rome from Ancient to Modern life and practice.

A great study, the first critic to explode absurd, conventional ideas about culture and not tolerate the evaluations of the unintelligent.
Dobpota
This is a very well written, brief introduction to Roman history, culture, and art with a delightful personal touch. Easy to read, helpful information. Don't miss the epilogue, it is an unusually candid and passionate opinion of the author, which I happen to share with the author.
ndup
There are folks who would gaze upon the Mona Lisa and say "I don't like the frame"...and walk away with nary a further thought or comment.
Just finished the book on Rome by Hughes and it was a fun ride. Gosh, to think a book covering centuries with untold numbers of facts might have some errors? And there's...gasp... some "repetition"...oh my.
I lived in Rome 40 years ago and am always fascinated by the city and it's influence on art and history. This book filled in some areas. I only wish Hughes was as funny and critical throughout the book as he was in the end part where he really lets loose on the death of culture in Rome.
And I don't agree with him always; I will always think that Rubens was one of the worst painters ever. But who cares. He goes into detail about MANY things I've always wondered about. It aint the be all, end all of books on Rome but it sure beats the hell out of many. It doesn't PRETEND to be anything other than what it is; one man's view (and love) of Rome. Sadly, Hughes died very soon after and didn't have the time to get it all perfect and tied up in a nice bow for the wanna be critics. He was on his last frail legs (literally) and suffering greatly as he did this book. I for one, loved it.
Arihelm
Hughes was a knowledgeable and erudite scholar and his book reflects his multi-faceted knowledge of the historical and cultural centrality of Rome. To Hughes, Rome was not merely a geographical location, but a cultural phenomenon, as well as a situs of the Western imagination. Hughes, in his book, illustrates this understanding with a broad and, at times, delightfully idiosyncratic examination of Rome and its influence on the development of Western art, politics and philosophy. Reading his book is like spending an evening with a lively and intellectual raconteur.
superstar
How do you fall in love with a city? I've fallen in love with a few of them: London, Venice, Istanbul. I fell in love with London before I ever got there, so when I did get there, I don't think I even saw the London of today. It seemed as if I already knew it like the back of my hand. Everywhere I went, familiar names called out to me. Baker Street, Bloomsbury, Tower Bridge. The Clink. The Clink!? Well, that explains that. Istanbul. I'd built the Hagia Sofia right along with Guy Gavriel Kay as he was writing The Sarantine Mosaic, but it was also redolent with the magic of the crossroads, of ancient ways and closed courtyards. There wasn't a cobblestone in Istanbul that didn't remember more than I'll ever be able to forget. Venice. I knew little to nothing of Venice. I was there for less than 24 hours. At least a third of that time asleep. The rest of the time it was raining. But I fell in love the way one does with a fleeting smile from a stranger you will never see again.

Robert Hughes fell in love with Rome. He fell in love with Rome the same way I fell in love with London, with Istanbul. Through myth and legend and story:

"For a time in my adolescence - not knowing Rome in any but the sketchiest way - I longed to be a Roman expatriate ... I was nuts about the idea of Rome ..."

Most of all - and this is something that Rome has in quantities that my particular loves can only dream of - he fell in love with art:

[An elderly Jesuit from his school in Australia, who traveled to Rome from time to time] "would bring back postcards, sedulously and with obvious pleasure gleaned from their racks in various museums and churches ... : Caravaggios, Bellinis, Michaelangelos."

It was art that brought him, eventually, to Rome where, before laying eyes on so much as one Rafael, he realized that right there in front of him was the most important work of art in the entire city. The city itself.

"Nothing exceeds the delight of one's first immersion in Rome on a fine spring morning ... The enveloping light can be of an incomparable clarity, throwing into gentle vividness every detail presented to the eye. First, the color, which was not like the color of other cities I had been in. Not concrete color, not cold glass color, not the color of overburned brick or harshly pigmented paint. Rather, the worn organic colors of the ancient earth and stone of which the city is composed, the colors of limestone, the ruddy gray of tufa, the warm discoloration of once-white marble and the speckled, rich surface of the marble known as pavonazzo, dappled with white spots and inclusions like the fat in a slice of mortadella."

I remember those colors, and if I'd had Hughes' critical eye I might have seen them so. I might have fallen in love with Rome the way I fell in love with Venice. With the color of the stones and the quality of the light on a rainy day.

Rome: A Cultural, Visual, and Personal History is all of that. Hughes gives us his personal history of Rome, from the fables of Romulus, Remus, and Aeneas to the fabulous Berlusconi, skimming swiftly over politics and personalities in order to settle down every few pages with a building, a fountain, a painting, a statue. With the stuff that matters. With the stuff that remains.
salivan
It is written in a nice way, it is easy to read, and enjoyable. But it starts as a story of Rome, then it turns to be a story of christianism, then it is the story of painting. It seems the author gets carried away by a subject he is touching and follows in that line, and then in another. In the end it is nothing integrally, and it is certainly not the story of Rome. I expected more deepness it doesn't move far beyond what we all already know.
Gunos
As in "Barcelona", Hughes has written a very engaging and well rounded account of the "Eternal City". Of particular interest is his perspective on the cultural, religious and social aspects of Rome as viewed by a contemporary art critic. I always enjoyed that about Hughes. He writes without any hesitation in expressing his opinion, which of course, is what critics do best. His work is wonderful. I recommend his autobiography as well, one of the best I ever read and "Barcelona" is facinating. Haven't read "Fatal Shores" but will soon.
Robert Hughes is an amazing writer. Rome is his last book and he is as creative, faithful to history, accurate, using a combination of his journalistic style with his profound knowledge of art and architecture, being an architect himself. His sense of humor is always there. Shame we will not be able to read any more books written by him. I am an academic and Robert Hughes is a compulsory reading for my students, always!
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