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Pandora's Keepers: Nine Men and the Atomic Bomb (Dynasty) ePub download

by Brian VanDeMark

  • Author: Brian VanDeMark
  • ISBN: 0316907901
  • ISBN13: 978-0316907903
  • ePub: 1402 kb | FB2: 1136 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Military
  • Publisher: Back Bay Books (July 12, 2005)
  • Pages: 432
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 720
  • Format: txt lrf mobi lrf
Pandora's Keepers: Nine Men and the Atomic Bomb (Dynasty) ePub download

Brian Van Demark, writes about the the men designed and built the world first Atomic Bomb and the concern they had . Pandora's Keepers" is a shining example how history should be told. One person found this helpful.

Brian Van Demark, writes about the the men designed and built the world first Atomic Bomb and the concern they had about it's use against innocents. Many of the same issues were covered by Richard Rhodes, in his great book 'The Making of the Atomic Bomb'. The designers had problems with the fact that the great feat of Science they performed would change the world for ever.

There Were Nine of Them: men with the names Oppenheimer, Teller, Fermi, Bohr, Lawrence, Bethe, Rabi, Szilard, and . In explaining their lives and their struggles, Brian VanDeMark superbly illuminates the ways in which these brilliant and sensitive men came to terms with their horrific creation.

There Were Nine of Them: men with the names Oppenheimer, Teller, Fermi, Bohr, Lawrence, Bethe, Rabi, Szilard, and Compton-brilliant men who believed in science and who saw before anyone else did the awesome workings of an invisible world. They came from many places, some fleeing Nazism in Europe, others quietly slipping out of university teaching jobs, all gathering in secret wartime laboratories to create the world's first atomic bomb.

Pandora's Keepers book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Pandora's Keepers: Nine Men And The Atomic Bomb as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

book by Brian VanDeMark. Many books have tried to shed light on why the greatest minds of 20th century physics designed the most horrific weapon in history. They Were Nine Brilliant Men who believed in science and who saw before anyone else the awesome workings of an invisible world.

Nine men - Oppenheimer, Teller, Fermi, Bohr, Lawrence, Bethe, Rabi, Szilard, Compton - brilliant men who believed in science .

Nine men - Oppenheimer, Teller, Fermi, Bohr, Lawrence, Bethe, Rabi, Szilard, Compton - brilliant men who believed in science and who saw before anyone else the amazing workings of an invisible world. Some of them were fleeing Nazism in Europe, others quietly slipping out of university teaching jobs, all gathering in secret wartime laboratories to create the world's first atomic bomb. During the war, few of the atomic scientists questioned the wisdom of their desperate endeavour, but afterwards they were forced to deal with the sobering legacy of their creation.

Books : History : English . Pandora's Keepers: Nine Men and the Atomic Bomb By Brian Vandemark 2005 416 Pages ISBN: 0316160512 EPUB + MOBI 2 MB + 2 MB. Nine men - Oppenheimer, Teller, Fermi, Bohr, Lawrence, Bethe, Rabi, Szilard, Compton - brilliant men who believed in science and who saw before anyone else the amazing workings of an invisible world.

Home VanDeMark, Brian Pandora's Keepers : Nine Men and the Atomic . Bibliographic Details. We also sell new Schiffer and Fedorowicz books for 20% off list price.

Home VanDeMark, Brian Pandora's Keepers : Nine Men and the Atomic Bomb. Pandora's Keepers : Nine Men and the Atomic Bomb. Title: Pandora's Keepers : Nine Men and the Atomic. Publisher: Little Brown & Company, New York, NY, . Publication Date: 2003. Shipping Terms: Shipping costs are based on books weighing . LB, or 1 KG.

Nine Men and the Atomic Bomb. Although thousands of scientists and support staff contributed to the development of the Trinity bomb and its cousins, writes VanDeMark (History/US Naval Academy), nine contributed centrally to the bomb’s creation and just as quickly raised objections, on a variety of grounds, to its employment.

' PANDORA'S KEEPERS offers a fresh look at the dawn of the nuclear age by examining not just the scientific accomplishments, but the thoughts, feelings, and judgments of these nine men who created the first weapon of mass destruction.' -Boston Globe They were nine brilliant men who believed in science and who saw before anyone else the awesome workings of an invisible world. They came from many places, some fleeing Nazism in Europe, others quietly slipping out of university teaching jobs, all gathering in secret wartime laboratories to create the world's first atomic bomb.
Xanna
Brian Van Demark, writes about the the men designed and built the world first Atomic Bomb and the concern they had about it's use against innocents. Many of the same issues were covered by Richard Rhodes, in his great book 'The Making of the Atomic Bomb'. The designers had problems with the fact that the great feat of Science they performed would change the world for ever. They should be less conerned because Nuclear Devices have never been used in War since the first two were dropped on Japan, they are so terrible that leaders have blinked from ever using them. That achievement is something they would have been proud of.
Yellow Judge
excellent
Authis
In Greek mythology, Pandora was the first woman on earth and was given a beautiful container which she was told never to open. But, of course, her curiosity got the better of her and when she opened it all the evil inside escaped into the world. When she tried to close it the only thing left inside was the Spirit of Hope. Pandora was afraid she would be punished, but Zeus didn't because he knew it would happen from the beginning, and so Hope was released as well.

It's easy to see the parallel to the story of Adam and Eve and the forbidden fruit, but Brian VanDeMark draws a more modern parallel to the beginning of the nuclear age. Instead of simply retelling the story of the Manhattan Project or the subsequent nuclear arms race, VanDeMark focuses on nine men who were involved in it: Leo Szilard, Enrico Fermi, I. I. Rabi, Niels Bohr, Edward Teller, Ernest Lawrence, Arthur Compton, Robert Oppenheimer, and Hans Bethe. Some were theoreticists whose insights paved the way, others were instrumental in refining the uranium and plutonium, and others put it all together in the mountains of New Mexico. All were incredibly brilliant men who changed the world.

Many of them had been forced to leave their European homelands by the threat of Nazism and found a welcoming community in America of fellow scientists and thinkers. Physics in those days was a mostly theoretical exercise with little practical application. But when it became known that Nazi scientists were working on splitting the atom to unleash its destructive power, the Manhattan Project was born with a goal of developing an atomic bomb first. But it wasn't just the threat that drove them; it was also the opportunity of a lifetime to pursue an intense professional curiosity.

But for some, seeing the devastation wrought on civilians in Hiroshima and Nagasaki caused anxiety over their work, even describing it as a "sin." They understood their willing role in developing the bomb and were conflicted by the obvious fact that it had indeed ended the war. Some argued for international control of the bomb and warned of an arms race, but not all. When international negotiations failed and the Soviet Union successfully tested their own atomic bomb (using information gained by espionage) some again lent their talents to the race to develop even bigger thermonuclear weapons, which used atoms of hydrogen - the hydrogen or H bomb - and release hundreds of times the destructive energy of the bombs dropped in WWII.

VanDeMark treats the subject rather fairly and he shows a talent for bringing the story to life in an exciting way that emphasizes the moral dilemmas of the time and the questions the physicists faced, and that there were no easy answers. There wasn't just a tremendous amount of research that went into the book but a lot of thought as well. I thought it was both interesting and readable, and it's one of those books that didn't get the kind of attention it deserved. (Incidentally, the title of my review comes from a poem written by Edward Teller for his children.)
Beazezius
With the skill of a fine novelist, Brian VanDeMark takes on a far more ominous subject as he fleshes out the lives and actions of 9 atomic scientists before, while, and after they created the first atomic bomb. It was a diverse group, some motivated to build a bomb out of fear that Hitler would otherwise get it first; others happy to do it simply because it could be done, with no concern for the consequences.

He deftly weaves together several threads, giving a broad explanation of the science involved, as he vividly describes the clashes and discussions, and sometimes lack of discussion, among scientists, political leaders, and the military, as the bomb was developed.

Half of the book is set after Hiroshima, and it's equally riveting. Top-rate minds, who thought being right was enough, were confronted by second-rate minds who hoarded power and grievances.

Today, we can all look back and freely offer our opinion about whether the atomic bomb should have been used. VanDeMark helps us focus on what the scientists knew, and didn't know, as they worked. Would Germany develop the bomb first? What would happen if Germany won the war? After the nuclear genie was released, could it ever be controlled?

VanDeMark did an enormous amount of research, then sorted all the facts, observations, and reports into a riveting book. "Pandora's Keepers" is a shining example how history should be told.
Urllet
The Soviet Union scientists -- and, yes, the Soviet Union had world class scientists, too -- successfully tested an atomic bomb almost exactly four years after we first tested our atom bomb in July of 1945.

I wonder what we would be writing -- even if we were still a free people who were allowed to write -- about these same nine men if they had refused to work on the bomb.

The simple fact is that the atom bomb ended up saving untold millions of lives.

As Richard Rhodes -- author of the masterful book "The Making of the Atomic Bomb" -- said on the History Channel's "The Manhattan Project":

"If you graph the human deaths from wars across the last 200 years, you will see an exponential increase up to 1945 at which point the line on the graph drops to about a million a year and stays there for the rest of the century. Clearly, there was a radical break in international affairs in 1945, and I think that break has to be attributed to this discovery that scientists made working peacefully in their laboratories trying to understand how the world really works rather than how we would wish that it worked."

As Robert Oppenheimer said, "A scientist cannot hold back progress because of fears of what the world will do with his discoveries."
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