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Duel of Eagles ePub download

by Peter Townsend

  • Author: Peter Townsend
  • ISBN: 0297179284
  • ISBN13: 978-0297179283
  • ePub: 1556 kb | FB2: 1392 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Military
  • Publisher: Littlehampton Book Services Ltd; First Thus edition (1970)
  • Pages: 476
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 198
  • Format: rtf lit docx mbr
Duel of Eagles ePub download

Peter Townsend was a British fighter pilot during the Battle of Britain

Peter Townsend was a British fighter pilot during the Battle of Britain. As a side note, he was also the man Princess Margaret wanted to marry but was forbidden by her sister, the Queen.

Duel of Eagles: The Struggle for the Skies from the First World War to the Battle of Britain

Duel of Eagles: The Struggle for the Skies from the First World War to the Battle of Britain. Return to the exciting first days of air warfare and see how these early events ultimately shaped this seminal struggle. A stirring survey led by a pilot who himself took part in the conflict.

Peter Townsend was a fighter pilot during the Battle of Britain which prevented a Nazi invasion of England in September 1940. This 1969 book has 480 pages for its Contents, seven Parts, and 29 chapters, Bibliography, Acknowledgments, and Index. There are 16 pages of photographs after page 256.

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Author:Townsend P. Duel of Eagles. Book Binding:Hardback. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites

Author:Townsend P. million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. Read full description. Duel of Eagles by Peter Townsend (Hardback, 1970). Pre-owned: lowest price. This 1969 book has 480 pages for its Contents, seven Parts, and 29 chapters, Bibliography, Acknowledgments, and Index

Peter Townsend was a fighter pilot during the Battle of Britain which prevented a Nazi invasion of England in September 1940.

Title: Duel of Eagles. Author: Peter Townsend. ISBN-10: 0-7858-1568-6. We are aware of 10 similar reference publications related to "Reference books (Cross topic-aircraft)". Messerschmitt Me163 & Heinkel He162.

Peter Michael Paul Townsend (born 16 September 1946) is an English professional golfer. After a very successful amateur career he turned professional in 1966. He had a number of wins in the early part of his professional career including the Piccadilly PGA Close Championship in 1968. He represented Great Britain twice in the Ryder Cup, in 1969 and 1971. Townsend had a very successful amateur career.

Group Captain Peter Townsend - himself a Battle of Britain pilot - traces the background to the conflict from the defeat and destruction of the Kaiser's air force to the long days of 1940 when Spitfires and Messerschmitts fought.

Group Captain Peter Townsend - himself a Battle of Britain pilot - traces the background to the conflict from the defeat and destruction of the Kaiser's air force to the long days of 1940 when Spitfires and Messerschmitts fought their battles to the death over England.

Painshade
A truly excellent accounting of the political and military build up to the air war, culminating here in the life and death struggle Britain faced in 1940 while being greatly outnumbered. I've read many books on the subject and this rates easily among the best. The first hand accounts - from both sides - are marvelous, written with a heavy dose of 1940's wit that enabled the Brits to keep their stiff upper lip in the face of relentless "total air war bombing" and invasion by, up to the Battle of Britain, a victorious foe.

It was a war where everyone had a part to play, unlike today where most people go about their business with hardly a care:

"Back in the mess at Digby the party had already begun as the last few pilots were coming in to land. They entered the anteroom by ones and twos until there were two nineteen-year-old wives without husbands. Those girls knew that they had not to wait any longer….'They just slid out of the anteroom. There was no fuss, no tears. They just left.'
They could have wrecked the morale of the squadron, but they never did. 'They were made of the same stuff as their husbands.' "

Sums up the mettle of these people, and the nations of today should be forever thankful to them.
Love Me
I have Robert Taylor's print of Peter Townsend banking his Hurricane over London towards Biggin Hill in the summer of 1940 - this book published in 1970 is a story from 1933 to the end of WW2 about the.slow sleep walk to war and his days as one of The Few. Great reading - long out of print but Amazon got a copy for me from a supplier.
Llathidan
This is a truly excellent book. I have loved it since it appeared in 1970. I have some knowledge of the literature and technology of the RAF of this period; my father flew for them, and my cousins were killed as RAF pilots. They would have called this "Pukka Gen" -- RAF slang for totally correct information. Of great interest to me was the description of the development of the RAF and Luftwaffe before the duel began. The author writes with humanity and with graceful style. Highly recommended.
Wire
Even giving credit to the fact that this book was written by a pilot who was there ( Townsend served in 43 Squadron ), one cannot escape the conclusion that this is just another book about the Battle of Britain. And not the best, unfortunately...
GWEZJ
Duel of Eagles

Peter Townsend was a fighter pilot during the Battle of Britain which prevented a Nazi invasion of England in September 1940. This 1969 book has 480 pages for its Contents, seven Parts, and 29 chapters, Bibliography, Acknowledgments, and Index. There are 16 pages of photographs after page 256. Part 1 describes “The Fledgling Years”. In 1916 Germany used Zeppelin airships to bomb London, the beginning of strategic bombing to damage people, property, and morale (Chapter 1). Airplanes fought over the front lines in France without parachutes. British fighters shot down Zeppelins. In May 1917 German Gotha bombers attacked England. Britain retaliated by bombing Germany. Chapter 2 tells more about the air war until 11/11/1918. Part 2 discusses the years through 1930's. Churchill’s advice to emphasize the Air Force helped to preserve it against budget cutters (Chapter 4). The Air Force is the front line of defense (p.54).

The Treaty of Rapallo allowed Germany to train an air force in Russia. The RAF faced two enemies: the Navy and the Army (p.59). The Baldwin government decided for a single air service (p.62). Chapter 5 tells about the secret training in Russia. Chapter 6 has stories about various future pilots. Part 3 continues the history. The Nazi Party came to power in Germany (Chapter 7). Goering began to create the most powerful air force in Europe. The Baldwin government expanded the RAF (Chapter 8). Radio waves could detect aircraft and show their distance and height (p.108). In March 1935 Hitler renounced the Versailles Treaty (Chapter 9). Hawker and Supermarine developed new fighters (p.116). Germany’s new military aircraft were built in 1936 (Chapter 10). Hitler occupied the Rhineland, France did not resist (p.121). The British worked on their radar system (Chapter 11). In 1937 Germany invaded Austria (Chapter 12). The Gestapo arrested many (p.145).

There was conflict in the British Air Ministry (p.149). Dowding requested bulletproof windshields for fighters. The menace of the Luftwaffe affected French policy (p.153). Britain’s air defenses were inadequate too (p.154). Neither France nor Britain were prepared for war, the Munich Agreement of 1938 followed. This gave Britain time to catch up in strength (Chapter 13). Then Germany occupied the rest of Czechoslovakia (p.163). Hundreds of Czech airmen left for France and England. Hurricanes and Spitfires arrived for the RAF (Chapter 14). British radar was operational (p.170). Hitler would invade Holland and Belgium for their airbases. The Pact with Russia enabled the start of WW II (p.180). Part 4 has the events after the war started. Britain was attacked (Chapter 15). Peter Townsend shot down a Heinkel 111 (Chapter 16), then another (Chapter 17). Germany invaded neutral Denmark and Norway (p.213).

Churchill became Premier. Dunkirk allowed 338,226 Allied soldiers to escape (Chapter 18). The French asked for an armistice (Chapter 19). General de Gaulle flew to London to head the Free French. The Battle of Britain was next (Part 5). The defeat of the RAF would allow an invasion (p.264). Hitler hoped for a peaceful settlement (p.266) until the British attacked the French fleet at Oran. Part 6 tells about the preparation for the battle. Fifty radar stations could detect enemy aircraft, this information was given to fighter pilots (Chapter 21). The German attack began (Chapter 22). The Battle of Britain begins in Part 7. RAF fighters inflicted serious losses on the Luftwaffe (Chapter 23). The bombing of London allowed Fighter Command to repair its damage (p.404). RAF bombers attacked German ships and barges (p.417). September 15 was the peak of the attack and defense (p.423). The invasion was postponed (p.424). This was a defeat (p.425). German losses increased, the daylight raids were stopped (p.429).

The RAF retained control of the skies, a decisive victory (‘Epilogue’). Keith Park explained the tactics (p.432). Fighter Command had more pilots and machines than when the Battle started. This may be the best book to explain the Battle of Britain, one of the most crucial battles in history.
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