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Combat Jump: The Young Men Who Led the Assault into Fortress Europe, July 1943 ePub download

by Ed Ruggero

  • Author: Ed Ruggero
  • ISBN: 0060088753
  • ISBN13: 978-0060088750
  • ePub: 1927 kb | FB2: 1655 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Military
  • Publisher: Harper; 1 edition (October 21, 2003)
  • Pages: 400
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 194
  • Format: lit mbr azw doc
Combat Jump: The Young Men Who Led the Assault into Fortress Europe, July 1943 ePub download

By 1943, the war in Europe had reached a turning point. To achieve this, Ike had a new weapon: . Combat Jump recounts the extraordinary contributions these young men made when their country called them to war, and it tells a classic tale of military action and remarkable courage. Well-written and flowing like a good novel, this book is highly recommended.

Combat Jump recounts the extraordinary contributions these young men made when their country called them to war, and it tells a classic tale of military action and remarkable courage Читать весь отзыв.

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Ed Ruggero's "Combat Jump" is a wonderfully written and engaging piece of story-telling! Based mainly upon interviews with veterans of the 82nd Airborne Division (most specifically members of the 505th PIR), Ruggero has crafted a real page turner that takes the reader from the initial.

Ed Ruggero's "Combat Jump" is a wonderfully written and engaging piece of story-telling! Based mainly upon interviews with veterans of the 82nd Airborne Division (most specifically members of the 505th PIR), Ruggero has crafted a real page turner that takes the reader from the initial theoretical ideals of American Airborne forces to the first major combat - the Sicilian invasion of 1943 - seen by the fruits of the imaginative "fathers of the Airborne".

In Combat Jump, Ed Ruggero describes the failure of the attempt to deliver a regiment of airborne infantry en masse to its landing zones in. .Ruggero paints Colonel James Gavin as the moving spirit of the new parachute force.

In Combat Jump, Ed Ruggero describes the failure of the attempt to deliver a regiment of airborne infantry en masse to its landing zones in Sicily. Despite this, the mission of the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR) was a success. The regiment’s performance led to the massive drop 11 months later in Normandy. Gavin, a military intellectual, was a rising star in the Army when he accepted command of the 505th PIR. The assignment would test his leadership and his resolution in every way possible.

Fine in Fine DJ. B&W Photographs. The young paratroopers of the U. S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division and how they changed the American way of war ISBN: 0060088753 (Parachute Troops, Airborne Operations, Aerial Operations). Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). Cooley, J. D. Beachmaster At Iwo Jima.

Combat Jump recounts the utions these young men . Books are returnable within 7 days, if not satisfactory.

Combat Jump recounts the utions these young men made when their country called them to war, and it tells a classic tale of military action and remarkable courage. Ed Ruggero is the author of Duty First: West Point and The Making of American Leaders, in addition to five novels about the military. He is an experienced keynote speaker on leadership and leadership development, and was an infantry officer in the United States Army for eleven years.

Combat Jump" by Ed Ruggero is the story of these young men who lead the assault . Ed Ruggero's Combat Jump is superb in every respect.

Combat Jump" by Ed Ruggero is the story of these young men who lead the assault into fortress Europe. This is a book for those who have an interest in how great leaders like James Gavin train and inspire their followers; in how the Army recruited its early airborne soldiers and the kinds of men who signed up; in the after-hours carousing that went on in the GI honky-tonks in the towns outside of Ft.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Combat Jump : The Young Men Who .

Follows the paratrooper invasion of Sicily in 1943 that set the groundwork for the Fortress Europe attack, citing the challenges that were presented to Dwight Eisenhower's troops, the consequences had they failed, the force's training activities, and their encounters with German Wehrmacht.

Jumping at night for the first time in combat from low-flying planes under fire, wandering far from their drop-zones, the 505th hit .

Jumping at night for the first time in combat from low-flying planes under fire, wandering far from their drop-zones, the 505th hit concrete-like hillsides and sun-dried furrows waiting in the dark to snap ankles or legs like twigs. The mission of this advance unit was to keep German and Italian defenders from counterattacking the most massive Allied landing force yet assembled on its beachheads.

Follows the paratrooper invasion of Sicily in 1943 that set the groundwork for the Fortress Europe attack, citing the challenges that were presented to Dwight Eisenhower's troops and the consequences had they failed.
Crazy
What happens when you take a group of young fresh-faced American boys, train them to become parachute infantry and drop them erroneously all over an island with a poorly conceived plan and faulty intelligence? Well, if they're members of the 82nd Airborne Division and under the command of James T. Gavin, they simply get the job done anyway!

This is the story that is depicted in Combat Jump. By all accounts, no one knew what to truly expect when the green 505th Regimental Combat Team was tasked with the first vertical envelopment of regimental size in the history of the United States Army. It was an experiment where the lab rats were the young sons of America and the test tube was the crucible of Sicily.

They were told there were no Germans on the island, no tanks and, after a concentrated drop, they would simply have to block the roads to prevent the Italian forces from attacking the beaches. In reality, the young paratroopers were scattered all over the island, came up against the Hermann Goering Panzer Division with its monster Tiger tanks and their reinforcement drop was attacked and decimated by friendly fire the next night.

The overall casualties were so great that General Eisenhower almost completely abandoned any future plans for airborne operations. What changed his mind was that the young, feisty paratroopers actually completed their mission and then some.

Just how these courageous boys overcame all of these failures against insurmountable odds is brilliantly told through the voices of the veterans who served in that campaign. Combat Jump describes the baptism of fire that taught the hard lessons and forged the doctrine of the airborne fighting forces that would become victorious in Normandy, Holland, the Battle of the Bulge and the Rhine River crossing.

John E. Nevola
Author of The Last Jump - A Novel of World War II
Tehn
Ed Ruggero's "Combat Jump" is a wonderfully written and engaging piece of story-telling! Based mainly upon interviews with veterans of the 82nd Airborne Division (most specifically members of the 505th PIR), Ruggero has crafted a real page turner that takes the reader from the initial theoretical ideals of American Airborne forces to the first major combat - the Sicilian invasion of 1943 - seen by the fruits of the imaginative "fathers of the Airborne". Particularly interesting is the description of how initial concepts of the US Airborne Army were brought to fruition, and how a young West Point Captain, James ("Slim Jim") M. Gavin, played into these early events. Gavin is of course central to the entire story of the 82nd as he was a company commander in the 503rd PIR (Parachute Infantry Regiment) during training at Fort Benning, later regimental commander of the 505th PIR on its jump into Sicily and combat through Italy, and finally division commander of the 82nd Airborne (promoted to this post in August '44). While initially not of rank and stature to play a significant role in pushing the Airborne concept into reality, "Slim Jim" was certainly a major player in keeping the Airborne on the map - this is exemplified by his leadership of the 505th in the Sicilian campaign, which is so eloquently relayed here in "Combat Jump". It is the strong and steadfast picture of Gavin as a commander leading from the front that comes shinning through in "Combat Jump". It is no wonder that the US Airborne Army succeeded (in spite of many perceived tactical failures and let downs) with man like Gavin at the helm! Ruggero should be commended for bringing to life again the larger than life character that was Jim Gavin.
From the standpoint of precision of presented historical facts "Combat Jump" suffers in a fashion not uncommon in similarly presented second-hand "oral histories", such as works by Stephen Ambrose. Mr. Ruggero has no doubt taken the relayed oral histories of veterans at face value (in fact Ruggero essentially conveys this message in the last paragraph of his Author's Note at the end of the book) as historical inconsistencies are present in the text. One glaring example is the common reference to battles with numerous Tiger tanks during the first 3-4 days of battle in Sicily. No doubt lightly-armed paratroopers fighting as essentially as foot infantry without support of mechanized forces and little by way of supporting artillery would "see" any German tanks as the dreaded Tigers. In reality just 17 Tiger 1 tanks were actually present on Sicily at the time of the invasion on July 10, 1943, and were essentially rendered non-combatant by pressing US Naval Gunfire. Moreover, by D-Day+3 ten of these tanks were destroyed by the Germans themselves to avoid their capture (six of the remaining seven met a similar fate in the days that followed). It therefore seems almost certain that many of the "Tigers" fought by the 82nd on Sicily were in fact Mark IV or Panther tanks. This in no way diminishes the valor and bravery of the paratroopers who took on multi-ton armored vehicles, often with little more than adrenalin and a carbine, it merely points out that soldiers fighting in the field seldom see the events historically, but rather from the real perspective of life or death. To the trooper in the field any tank might as well be a Tiger when he was exposed without shelter and on his own. Neither Ruggero nor the veterans relaying their experiences can be particularly faulted for such errors. It is only pointed out here to illustrate the point from a "purity of history" vantage point.
Despite errors in precision of historical facts, "Combat Jump" is a wonderful read and worthy of attention as a tribute to the men who fought with the US Airborne, not just those of the 82nd Sicilian campaign. A solid read, not quite 5 stars but definitely 4 and three-quarters!!
Tori Texer
As enjoyable as his second work First Men In, and considering how widely dispersed this RCT was, the concrete soil they had to land on and they had to take on Tiger tanks, makes their achievements even more remarkable in some respects than the Normandy landings. Another testament on how the actions of just a few men, and frequently only one man, can influence the outcome of a battle. My only complaint is that this book even had fewer maps than First Men In...in fact just one non topographical map. Especially considering how widely dispersed actions were in Sicily, more tactical maps would certainly have made following the action a lot easier.
Felhalar
The book came quickly and was in excellent condition. The author tells the story of the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment's training, preparation and jump into Sicily. The story is well written. From the first chapter, the reader understands that most of the pilots got lost and were desperate to even find the island of Sicily much less the correct drop zones. Then, the US and British Navy open fire shooting down hundreds of paratroopers in their harmless cargo planes. The book becomes a "page turner" as these men overcome the terrible flight to Sicily and then engage German Tiger tanks with little more than hand grenades and bazookas. If you think the story of Normandy was exciting, just try the jump into Sicily.
Winail
Great job of making the reader feel as if he was with the men of the 505th! Makes me even more prouder to be a former Paratrooper and member of the 82nd Airborne when you read how well they performed under tremendous pressure and accomplished their mission. Well done!
Enila
A very good description of the actual feelings and actions of small unit Airborne Infantry Soldiers and Commanders in North Africa and Sicily. Original interviews with the WWII soldiers who were actually there!
Vosho
What happens when you take a group of young fresh-faced American boys, train them to become parachute infantry and drop them erroneously all over an island with a poorly conceived plan and faulty intelligence? Well, if they're members of the 82nd Airborne Division and under the command of James T. Gavin, they simply get the job done anyway!

This is the story that is depicted in Combat Jump. By all accounts, no one knew what to truly expect when the green 505th Regimental Combat Team was tasked with the first vertical envelopment of regimental size in the history of the United States Army. It was an experiment where the lab rats were the young sons of America and the test tube was the crucible of Sicily.

They were told there were no Germans on the island, no tanks and, after a concentrated drop, they would simply have to block the roads to prevent the Italian forces from attacking the beaches. In reality, the young paratroopers were scattered all over the island, came up against the Hermann Goering Panzer Division with its monster Tiger tanks and their reinforcement drop was attacked and decimated by friendly fire the next night.

The overall casualties were so great that General Eisenhower almost completely abandoned any future plans for airborne operations. What changed his mind was that the young, feisty paratroopers actually completed their mission and then some.

Just how these courageous boys overcame all of these failures against insurmountable odds is brilliantly told through the voices of the veterans who served in that campaign. Combat Jump describes the baptism of fire that taught the hard lessons and forged the doctrine of the airborne fighting forces that would become victorious in Normandy, Holland, the Battle of the Bulge and the Rhine River crossing.

John E. Nevola
Author of The Last Jump - A Novel of World War II
Ed Ruggero's "Combat Jump" is a wonderfully written and engaging piece of story-telling! Based mainly upon interviews with veterans of the 82nd Airborne Division (most specifically members of the 505th PIR), Ruggero has crafted a real page turner that takes the reader from the initial theoretical ideals of American Airborne forces to the first major combat - the Sicilian invasion of 1943 - seen by the fruits of the imaginative "fathers of the Airborne". Particularly interesting is the description of how initial concepts of the US Airborne Army were brought to fruition, and how a young West Point Captain, James ("Slim Jim") M. Gavin, played into these early events. Gavin is of course central to the entire story of the 82nd as he was a company commander in the 503rd PIR (Parachute Infantry Regiment) during training at Fort Benning, later regimental commander of the 505th PIR on its jump into Sicily and combat through Italy, and finally division commander of the 82nd Airborne (promoted to this post in August '44). While initially not of rank and stature to play a significant role in pushing the Airborne concept into reality, "Slim Jim" was certainly a major player in keeping the Airborne on the map - this is exemplified by his leadership of the 505th in the Sicilian campaign, which is so eloquently relayed here in "Combat Jump". It is the strong and steadfast picture of Gavin as a commander leading from the front that comes shinning through in "Combat Jump". It is no wonder that the US Airborne Army succeeded (in spite of many perceived tactical failures and let downs) with man like Gavin at the helm! Ruggero should be commended for bringing to life again the larger than life character that was Jim Gavin.
From the standpoint of precision of presented historical facts "Combat Jump" suffers in a fashion not uncommon in similarly presented second-hand "oral histories", such as works by Stephen Ambrose. Mr. Ruggero has no doubt taken the relayed oral histories of veterans at face value (in fact Ruggero essentially conveys this message in the last paragraph of his Author's Note at the end of the book) as historical inconsistencies are present in the text. One glaring example is the common reference to battles with numerous Tiger tanks during the first 3-4 days of battle in Sicily. No doubt lightly-armed paratroopers fighting as essentially as foot infantry without support of mechanized forces and little by way of supporting artillery would "see" any German tanks as the dreaded Tigers. In reality just 17 Tiger 1 tanks were actually present on Sicily at the time of the invasion on July 10, 1943, and were essentially rendered non-combatant by pressing US Naval Gunfire. Moreover, by D-Day+3 ten of these tanks were destroyed by the Germans themselves to avoid their capture (six of the remaining seven met a similar fate in the days that followed). It therefore seems almost certain that many of the "Tigers" fought by the 82nd on Sicily were in fact Mark IV or Panther tanks. This in no way diminishes the valor and bravery of the paratroopers who took on multi-ton armored vehicles, often with little more than adrenalin and a carbine, it merely points out that soldiers fighting in the field seldom see the events historically, but rather from the real perspective of life or death. To the trooper in the field any tank might as well be a Tiger when he was exposed without shelter and on his own. Neither Ruggero nor the veterans relaying their experiences can be particularly faulted for such errors. It is only pointed out here to illustrate the point from a "purity of history" vantage point.
Despite errors in precision of historical facts, "Combat Jump" is a wonderful read and worthy of attention as a tribute to the men who fought with the US Airborne, not just those of the 82nd Sicilian campaign. A solid read, not quite 5 stars but definitely 4 and three-quarters!!
As enjoyable as his second work First Men In, and considering how widely dispersed this RCT was, the concrete soil they had to land on and they had to take on Tiger tanks, makes their achievements even more remarkable in some respects than the Normandy landings. Another testament on how the actions of just a few men, and frequently only one man, can influence the outcome of a battle. My only complaint is that this book even had fewer maps than First Men In...in fact just one non topographical map. Especially considering how widely dispersed actions were in Sicily, more tactical maps would certainly have made following the action a lot easier.
The book came quickly and was in excellent condition. The author tells the story of the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment's training, preparation and jump into Sicily. The story is well written. From the first chapter, the reader understands that most of the pilots got lost and were desperate to even find the island of Sicily much less the correct drop zones. Then, the US and British Navy open fire shooting down hundreds of paratroopers in their harmless cargo planes. The book becomes a "page turner" as these men overcome the terrible flight to Sicily and then engage German Tiger tanks with little more than hand grenades and bazookas. If you think the story of Normandy was exciting, just try the jump into Sicily.
Great job of making the reader feel as if he was with the men of the 505th! Makes me even more prouder to be a former Paratrooper and member of the 82nd Airborne when you read how well they performed under tremendous pressure and accomplished their mission. Well done!
A very good description of the actual feelings and actions of small unit Airborne Infantry Soldiers and Commanders in North Africa and Sicily. Original interviews with the WWII soldiers who were actually there!
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