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The Rolls-Royce Armoured Car (New Vanguard) ePub download

by David Fletcher,Henry Morshead

  • Author: David Fletcher,Henry Morshead
  • ISBN: 1849085803
  • ISBN13: 978-1849085809
  • ePub: 1468 kb | FB2: 1750 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Military
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (April 17, 2012)
  • Pages: 48
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 689
  • Format: mobi lrf rtf azw
The Rolls-Royce Armoured Car (New Vanguard) ePub download

David Fletcher was born in 1942 This book describes the use of the Rolls-Royce armored car as a weapon of war. From its birth in August 1914 as a private vehicle used in France by a Royal Naval Ai. .

David Fletcher was born in 1942. He has written a number of books and articles on military subjects and is currently the historian at the Tank Museum, Bovington, UK. He has spent over 40 years studying the development of British armoured vehicles during the two World Wars. This book describes the use of the Rolls-Royce armored car as a weapon of war. From its birth in August 1914 as a private vehicle used in France by a Royal Naval Air Service Squadron, to its final use in WWII by the Home Guard (Dad's Army) for internal security. I found it intriguing that most of the cars were privately owned, often locally made.

The Rolls-Royce Armoured Car - New Vanguard 189 (Paperback)

The Rolls-Royce Armoured Car - New Vanguard 189 (Paperback). David Fletcher (author), Henry Morshead (illustrator). The first Rolls-Royce armoured car was a privately owned vehicle fitted with a machine-gun and a limited amount of armour plate, used by the Royal Naval Air Service in Flanders in 1914. By 1915, nearly 100 had been built and turned over to the Army. The cars were fast, quiet and reliable but above all powerful.

The first Rolls-Royce armoured car was a privately owned vehicle fitted with a.

The first Rolls-Royce armoured car was a privately owned vehicle fitted with a machine-gun and a limited amount of armour plate at a dockyard in France. It was used by a squadron of the Royal Naval Air Service in Flanders in 1914. A new design with a larger body and dome shaped turret also appeared for service in India. The 11th Hussars still had Rolls-Royces in Egypt when the war against Italy began and the youngest of these was over fifteen years old when they went into action, but after that their numbers dwindled as newer vehicles came along. But then history repeated itself. Britain was threatened with invasion and a new army of veterans was raised to assist with defence. Backed by First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill more and better versions followed until, by 1915 there were about 100 of them which were then handed over to the Army.

David John Fletcher MBE (born 1942) is a British military historian specialising in the history of armoured . Fletcher, David; Morshead, Henry (2011). The Rolls-Royce Armoured Car. New Vanguard S. Oxford: Osprey Publishing.

David John Fletcher MBE (born 1942) is a British military historian specialising in the history of armoured warfare, particularly that of the United Kingdom. He was an employee of The Tank Museum, Bovington from 1982 until December 2012, becoming the museum's longest serving member of staff. Earlier that year, he was a panellist on Operation Think Tank, an international symposium on tanks, held in California. He also presents contemporary media such as YouTube for the Tank Museum. David Fletcher hosts a regular video.

The Rolls-Royce Armoured Car. Author: David Fletcher. We are aware of 1 similar reference publications related to "Rolls Royce Armoured Car". Rolls-Royce Armoured Car Owners Workshop Manual 1915-44.

The first Rolls-Royce armoured car was a privately owned vehicle fitted with a machine-gun and a limited amount of armour plate, used by the Royal . The Rolls-Royce Armoured Car - David Fletcher. Introduction.

The first Rolls-Royce armoured car was a privately owned vehicle fitted with a machine-gun and a limited amount of armour plate, used by the Royal Naval Air Service in Flanders in 1914. A Rolls in the desert is above rubies,' said Lawrence of Arabia.

David Fletcher, Henry Morshead. The first Rolls-Royce armoured car was a privately owned vehicle fitted with a machine-gun and a limited amount of armour plate, used by the Royal Naval Air Service in Flanders in 1914

David Fletcher, Henry Morshead. New Vanguard 189. Illustrator: Henry Morshead. David Fletcher was born in 1942. Short code: NVG 189. Publication Date: 20 Apr 2012. Henry Morshead is a design consultant in the European automotive and aerospace sectors, with clients including Jaguar, Bentley, Citroën and Airbus.

The first Rolls-Royce armoured car was a privately owned vehicle fitted with a machine-gun and a limited amount of armour plate at a dockyard in France. It was used by a squadron of the Royal Naval Air Service in Flanders in 1914. Backed by First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill more and better versions followed until, by 1915 there were about 100 of them which were then handed over to the Army. "They searched the world for War" as Sir Albert Stern said of them and before long there were Rolls-Royce armoured cars operating as far apart as German South West Africa, the Western Desert, Gallipoli, all over the Middle East and the north west frontier of India.

All of them used the classic 40/50hp Silver Ghost chassis. They were fast, silent and reliable but above all strong. "A Rolls in the desert is above rubies" said Lawrence of Arabia and the Duke of Westminster would have agreed with him following his famous raid to rescue the kidnapped crew of the steamship HMS Tara. At least one car accompanied the adventurous MP Oliver Locker-Lampson on his adventures in Russia.

After the war, unable to find a better model the War Office simply copied the original Admiralty design with minor improvements. If that was not enough the Royal Air Force also acquired some to support their operations in the Middle East. A new design with a larger body and dome shaped turret also appeared for service in India. They also served in Ireland and even, briefly in Shanghai.

The 11th Hussars still had Rolls-Royces in Egypt when the war against Italy began and the youngest of these was over fifteen years old when they went into action, but after that their numbers dwindled as newer vehicles came along. But then history repeated itself. Britain was threatened with invasion and a new army of veterans was raised to assist with defence. Some battalions built home made armoured cars, on private chassis and at least three of these were based on Rolls-Royces.

Adrielmeena
Although I'm not totally obsessed with armored fighting vehicles (although my interest level IS growing), I've really enjoyed Haynes' tank manuals so far. I recently re-read their Tiger tank manual, and was impressed by how detailed and well-rounded it was. Having gotten hooked on the author's "tank chats" on The Tank Museum's YouTube page, I was looking forward to another David Fletcher/Haynes/Tank Museum collaboration. The result is kind of a missed opportunity.

The big problem with this book is that it's terribly unbalanced. For a "workshop manual," it's rather short on the hardcore technical details I've come to expect from this series. Sans introduction and index, this book is 147 pages long. Of that, a whopping 83 pages are devoted to a lengthy potted history of the vehicle, which is essentially a blow-by-blow account of the many operations they participated in. The first few chapters are interesting enough for military history buffs, but have been recounted endlessly elsewhere.

The second half fares better, but is obviously a bit pressed for space. There are some excellent technical diagrams and descriptions, some interesting photographic walkthroughs of vehicle maintenance (checking the engine oil, starting the engine, etc.), and a chapter on restoring "Sliabh na mBan," which was escorting Michael Collins when he was ambushed and killed. Unfortunately, the technical descriptions are rather skimpy when compared with those in Haynes' other tank manuals.

For all the talent involved, this book is kind of disappointing. Like other Haynes titles, it has plenty of excellent photographs of restored vehicles, and plenty of "in action" shots, which should come in handy for modelers. As a hardware geek, it's merely decent. Haynes has published some solid books this year, but they're yet to hit it out of the park.
Opilar
The Rolls Royce {RR} Silver Ghost was built from 1907 - 1925. This is the model {more than any other} produced by company that deserves "The Best Car in the World" moniker that was the company's [unoffical} slogan for most of the 20th century. The 1st World War created the unlikely circumstance where a high quality/cost luxury car chassis was translated into a supremely reliable, quiet, adaptable and durable armored fighting vehicle that this excellent Vanguard volume details in a concise, lucid and highly readable manner. Luxury car chassis such as the Silver Ghost were sold without a body - so each Armored shell for a RR chassis was a semi-customized and individual effort. This vehicle was very expensive to build but it's quality and long service record show that Britain got it's "money's worth" for them ! This book gives a complete history of the RR armored car design,specifications, various model development, upgrading/moderization and the numerous military/colonial campaigns that it participated in between 1915 and 1941. BUT some of them would remain in service right thru the end of World War 11 - a remarkable run !! France, Gallipoli, Iraq, Africa, Egypt, Libya, Ireland, India - the Rolls Royce Armoured Car was a design that was adaptable for use thru- out the Brtish Empire and it's protectorate and client states. The used copy that I recently received thru the Amazon Web Site was in excellent condition. This 46 page volume packs a lot of information and is an excellent value and I give it between a 4 and 4 1/2 star rating.
Xaluenk
There haven't been too many books on the Rolls-Royce armored car; this book redresses that imbalance. The quality of the paper and printing is excellent as are the many photos of the armored car in service. There are color pictures of two restored cars. The only negative I can find is that the book is geared more for the automotive crowd. It is not quite the walk-around needed by modelers where every aspect is photographed in detail . Still, that is a minor quibble for an overall excellent book.
Kison
Very nice overview of this iconic armored car - hardcover, full color throughout, high quality printing. Many color photos of preserved examples. A truly definitive book on this type is waiting to be written, but this is about as good as it gets for the time being.
Alsalar
Given the author and the publisher, its only natural to be left on the last page feeling a little disappointed the book wasn't a few hundred pages longer.

Good news
The content is usual decent gloss one gets with books of this type, and Mr Fletcher has the knowledge along with the resources to pack the tight word/illustration limits full of first rate stuff. It is a good book within the limits of the format, and since there's not a lot else out there on the subject anyway, if you want a book on RR A/C's look no further.

Bad news
The Kindle edition is a bit hard on the photos which are such an important part of these books, and the formatting was a bit off base from multi-page images like the cutaways.
Lli
This book describes the use of the Rolls-Royce armored car as a weapon of war. From its birth in August 1914 as a private vehicle used in France by a Royal Naval Air Service Squadron, to its final use in WWII by the Home Guard (Dad's Army) for internal security. I found it intriguing that most of the cars were privately owned, often locally made. All in all, this book is an interesting side note to the New Vanguard series on military equipment.
Dark_Sun
Nice book great service
An excellent addition to the series.
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