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Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know ePub download

by Jeremy Bernstein

  • Author: Jeremy Bernstein
  • ISBN: 0521126371
  • ISBN13: 978-0521126373
  • ePub: 1782 kb | FB2: 1923 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Military
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (February 8, 2010)
  • Pages: 316
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 814
  • Format: azw mbr docx lrf
Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know ePub download

David Hafemeister, Physics Today.

David Hafemeister, Physics Today. Jeremy Bernstein's Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know delivers as advertised, arming the reader with sufficent historical and technical background to engage contemporary journalism on nuclear weapons or to begin more in-depth study of the histories of science, the Cold War, and related topics. Edward H. Jeter, World History Bulletin.

Nuclear Weapons book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Nuclear Weapons is a history of nuclear weapons.

This book is a history of nuclear weapons. From their initial theoretical development at the start of the twentieth century to the recent tests in North Korea, Jeremy Bernstein seeks to describe the basic science of nuclear weaponry at each point in the narrative. This book is a history of nuclear weapons.

Nuclear Weapons What You Need to Know by Jeremy Bernstein. ark:/13960/t2g777w9n.

Bernstein is best known for his popular science writing and profiles of scientists. He was a staff writer for The New Yorker from 1961 to 1995 and authored many dozens of articles.

Author: Bernstein, Jeremy. Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know. Jeremy Bernstein is Professor Emeritus of Physics at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. Title: Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know. Acceptable - A readable copy. He was a staff writer for the New Yorker from 1961 to 1995. He has written some fifty technical papers, three monographs, and twelve books, including Albert Einstein, which was nominated for a National Book Award; Hitler's Uranium Club; a biography of Robert Oppenheimer entitled Oppenheimer: Portrait of an Enigma; and most recently Plutonium: A History of the World's Most Dangerous Element.

In particular, I wish he had given more space to the topic of nuclear weapons proliferation, one of the gravest threats to the world.

51, 126 (2013); 1. 119/1. 4775551 Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know Phys. I conclude that Bernstein, an author of recognized skill, wrote this book mainly for his own enjoyment and to set the record straight. Good reasons, to be sure, but likely to reduce the number of readers for a subject that is almost certainly one of the most important facing mankind today. In particular, I wish he had given more space to the topic of nuclear weapons proliferation, one of the gravest threats to the world.

Nuclear Weapons is a history of nuclear weapons. From their initial theoretical development at the start of the twentieth century to the recent tests in North Korea, the author seeks to, at each point in the narrative, describe the basic science of nuclear weaponry.

Jeremy Bernstein has written a very interesting, albeit somewhat mistitled, book that offers a lively and anecdotal history of the evolution of nuclear weapons, but hardly all of "what you need to know. The book may be particularly illuminating for the reader who has already perused the more comprehensive histories of the emergence of nuclear physics and the resultant destructive weapons. It offers insight on the human side of physics; the author is a former staff writer for the New Yorker and a highly competent nuclear physicist with experience at the various weapon laboratories

Nuclear Weapons is a history of nuclear weapons. From their initial theoretical development at the start of the twentieth century to the recent tests in North Korea, the author seeks to, at each point in the narrative, describe the basic science of nuclear weaponry. At the same time, he offers accounts and anecdotes of the personalities involved, many of whom he has known firsthand. Dr. Bernstein writes in response to what he sees as a widespread misunderstanding throughout the media of the basic workings and potential impact of nuclear weaponry.
JoJoshura
An excellent guide to the most powerful weapons known to man, by a physicist who observed two nuclear explosions. The theory and scientific history behind nuclear fission and fusion given is accessible enough for any reader.

On history there is discovery of uranium in 1789, Mendelev’s periodic table and its missing elements, Crooke’s cathode–ray tubes, cyclotrons, Zippe gas centrifuges, even elementary star wars (Project Argus). A culmination was in the 1940s at Los Alamos where super weapons like Little Boy and Fat Man that ended WWII were designed.

On theory and technology are various energy conversions and calculations (including TNT/truck bomb baselines), implosive lense balls with plutonium pits, and lithium/ heavy hydrogen fuels. On fusion, an error is made a hydrogen gas cloud could self-collapse under gravity to form a star (p. 214) which is impossible unless a miracle occurred to suspend the ideal gas law.

Smoky’s 1956 nuclear blast anatomy given dispels myths about what happens and types of damage a bomb causes.

The book has many veiled spiritual references for those with eyes to see:

*The first successful test was called Trinity.
*Mendelev and Robert Oppenheimer’s Sanskrit usages: ‘eka’ (‘near’) Osmium, and (at Trinity) Baghavad Ghita 11.32 ‘…I am become Death, The shatterer of Worlds.’
*Uranium and the first few transuranics named after planets (Neptune and Pluto), then people (Fermi and Einstein), so both planets and men can be idolised.
*If the sun was created the eye must have been at the same time (wrong as the eye was created on day six of the universe, two days after the sun).

And what of the future? The conclusion is about proliferation: there are still 1,000s of live weapons, also rogue states, nuclear shopping lists and emboldened Islamic terror groups. Treaties are useless and time to next detonation approaches. For effect the author uses the word Armageddon, which is from the ‘out-dated’ Holy Bible, the battle of that great day of God Almighty:

“And he gathered them together into a place called in the Hebrew tongue Armageddon.”
Revelation 16.16 (cf. I Thessalonians 5.3 and Zechariah 14.12)
Livina
Provides colorful and detailed account of the development and basic functioning of nuclear weapons as seen through the eyes of a physicist-turned-writer whose career in physics started just after the basic engineering challenges of nuclear weapons were mostly solved. Written with clarity, thus fun and easy to read. Nicely puts into perspective the initial discovery of nuclear fission. Good coverage of the Manhattan Project of the political intricacies that led to the development of the "super"(hydrogen booster) bomb.
Prorahun
Jeremy Bernstein has been studying, researching and writing about the science, the people and the history of nuclear weapons for years. He builds the stories into a concise, readable and understandable book that is well worth the hours of reading and thinking about the power, the dangers and the politics of an important force in our world.
Kazigrel
NUCLEAR WEAPONS: What You Need To Know, is a very well written account of the people and the physics that went into creating the world's weapons of mass destruction. Any one teaching about this topic will surely wish to consider this as a textbook or reference. The book makes a nice complement to the video THE DAY AFTER TRINITY in which one "meets" many of the characters in Bernstein's book. The Day After Trinity

A 2007 book, it makes reference to many contemporary problems, Iran, Iraq, a terrorist bomb, DPRK, and proliferation. It includes suggestions for further reading should one find something missing, or wish to pursue the topic in more depth.

The one element I found missing in detail, since this is "What You Need To Know," is what happens to people when such a device explodes overhead or otherwise nearby. Bernstein does state numbers for deaths in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. He gives, 90,000 and 74,000. I believe Carey Sublette provides similar numbers. The question becomes, "In what year do you stop counting?" For many decades now the "official" figure that comes from reliable sources in Hiroshima is that by Dec. 31, 1945, the death toll was 140,000, with 10% possible error. Sadako Sasaki died 10 years later as did many others between 1945 and 1955. In general, not criticizing Bernstein or Sublette, when an enemy of ours kills, we use death figures from the victims; when WE kill we use OUR figures. When the 90,000 figure is used for nuclear deaths, I wonder if someone is trying to make it seem no worse than the Tokyo air raids. The United States government has never published a full and detailed account of what happened to the people of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and still remains with the few survivors to this day, some 63 years after.

I would add to the Further Reading Suggestions, Naomi Shohno's THE LEGACY OF HIROSHIMA, Legacy of Hiroshima: Its Past, Our Future, James C. Warf's ALL THINGS NUCLEAR, All Things Nuclear, and DAYS TO REMEMBER from the Hiroshima Nagasaki Publishing Committee, Days to Remember: An Account of the Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

NUCLEAR WEAPONS: What You Need To Know, is an excellent book. It has my highest recommendation. Give it 10 STARS!
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