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Excavating Mormon Pasts: The New Historiography Of The Last Half Century ePub download

by Newell G. Bringhurst,Lavina Fielding Anderson

  • Author: Newell G. Bringhurst,Lavina Fielding Anderson
  • ISBN: 1589580907
  • ISBN13: 978-1589580909
  • ePub: 1725 kb | FB2: 1136 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Historical Study & Educational Resources
  • Publisher: Greg Kofford Books Inc; Limited edition (July 30, 2006)
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 847
  • Format: azw docx doc lrf
Excavating Mormon Pasts: The New Historiography Of The Last Half Century ePub download

Excavating Mormon Pasts book. Bringhurst, Davis Bitton, and Lavina Fielding Anderson.

Excavating Mormon Pasts book. The advent of the New Mormon History after World War II- launched by such works as Leonard Arrington's Great Basin Kingdom, Fawn Brodie's No Man Knows My History, Robert Flanders' Nauvoo: Kingdom on the Mississippi, The historiography of Mormonism's first hundred years consisted of a loud but fairly simple debate between two voices: faithful Mormonism and anti-Mormonism.

Newell G. Bringhurst (born 3 April 1942) is an American historian and author of books and essays. Excavating Mormon Pasts: The New Historiography of the Last Half Century. Salt Lake City: Greg Kofford Books. Most of his writings have been about Mormonism- particularly topics and figures of controversy, such as blacks and the priesthood, Fawn Brodie, polygamy, and schisms within the LDS movement Contents. Bringhurst, Newell . Smith, Darron . eds.

Excavating Mormon Pasts assembles sixteen knowledgeable scholars . Books related to Excavating Mormon Pasts: The New Historiography of the Last Half Century.

Excavating Mormon Pasts assembles sixteen knowledgeable scholars from both LDS and the Community of Christ traditions w. . Bringhurst, Lavina Fielding Anderson

Newell G. Bringhurst, Lavina Fielding Anderson. The historiography of Mormonism's first hundred years consisted of a loud but fairly simple debate between two voices: faithful Mormonism and anti-Mormonism. The advent of the New Mormon History after World War II- launched by such works as Leonard Arrington's Great Basin Kingdom, Fawn Brodie's No Man Knows My History, Robert Flanders' Nauvoo: Kingdom on the Mississippi, and Juanita Brooks' Mountain Meadows Massacre-created a more complex, polyvocal discussion.

The historiography of Mormonism's first hundred years consisted of a loud but fairly simple debate between two voices: faithful Mormonism and anti-Mormonism  .

Excavating Mormon Pasts: THE BRAND NEW Historiography from the Last Fifty percent Century. Bringhurst, Newell G. (Winter season 1978). An Ambiguous Decision: The Execution of Mormon Priesthood Denial for the Dark Guy-A Re-Examination". Sodium Lake Town: Greg Kofford Books. (2004). Urbana: School of Illinois Press. Hamer, John . (10 Sept 2007). Scattering FROM THE Saints: Schism Within Mormonism. Utah Historic Quarterly (46): 45–64. (Summer season 1979).

Excavating Mormon Pasts: The New Historiography of the Last Half Century. Salt Lake City, Utah: Greg Kofford Books, 2004. Quincy D. Newell (a1). University of Wyoming. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 28 July 2009.

Bringhurst, Newell . Anderson, Lavina Fielding, eds. (31 May 2004). Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Excavating Mormon Pasts assembles sixteen knowledgeable scholars from both LDS and the Community of Christ .

Excavating Mormon Pasts assembles sixteen knowledgeable scholars from both LDS and the Community of Christ traditions who have long participated skillfully in this dialogue. It presents their insightful and sometimes incisive surveys of where the New Mormon History has come from and which fields remain unexplored. It is both a vital reference work and a stimulating picture of the New Mormon History in the early twenty-­first century. Includes Mormon History Association Award Winning Essay by Roger Launius.

Bringhurst, Davis Bitton, and Lavina Fielding Anderson.

The historiography of Mormonism's first hundred years consisted of a loud but fairly simple debate between two voices: faithful Mormonism and anti-Mormonism. The advent of the New Mormon History after World War II-- launched by such works as Leonard Arrington's Great Basin Kingdom, Fawn Brodie's No Man Knows My History, Robert Flanders' Nauvoo: Kingdom on the Mississippi, and Juanita Brooks' Mountain Meadows Massacre--created a more complex, polyvocal discussion. This nuanced dialogue is, after fifty years, only swelling in number of participants, methodological sophistication, respect for primary sources, and consideration of the full range of participants in the many Mormon stories. Excavating Mormon Pasts assembles sixteen knowledgeable scholars from both the Latter-day Saint and the Community of Christ traditions who have long participated skillfully in this dialogue. It presents their insightful and sometimes incisive surveys of where the New Mormon History has come from and which fields remain unexplored. They include Klaus J. Hansen, David L. Paulsen, Roger D. Launius, Stephen C. LeSueur, Glen M. Leonard, Craig L. Foster, M. Guy Bishop, Jessie L. Embry, Kahlile Mehr (heading a team of other international specialists, including Mark L. Grover, Reid L. Neilson, Donald Q. Cannon, and Grant Underwood), Danny L. Jorgensen, Mark A. Scherer, Todd Compton, Martha Sonntag Bradley, Newell G. Bringhurst, Davis Bitton, and Lavina Fielding Anderson. Taking a topical approach, these essays delve into the controversial views of Mormonism's beginnings, the work produced on Mormonism's development during Joseph Smith's lifetime with the divergent paths followed since then, Community of Christ contributions to the explorations--particularly of the shared pre-Martyrdom past, and what may be considered Mormonism's cultural and international flowering. The internal dialogue in this book is vigorous--over exact definitions of the New Mormon History, over which works deserve landmark status and which are peripheral, and over the many questions yet to be answered. Both a vital reference work and a stimulating picture of the New Mormon History in the early twenty-first century, it is also a beguiling invitation for others to join in producing and commenting on Mormon historiography during the next fifty years.
Marinara
This primarily a bibliography (a word I understand better). It lists books and articles about Church history. There is value in gaining more knowledge of all these sources, and their general approach. But, I thought there would be more actual content. My fault.
Umdwyn
Co-editor Newell Bringhurst noted in the Introdution to this 2004 book, "Over the past sixty years a growing body of historical literature has emerged, examining diverse aspects of Mormon history."

Here are some quotations from the book:

"For many years, many Mormon historians denied (Joseph) Smith's connection with these types of activities, asserting that the affidavits had been prepared as anti-Mormon statements designed to drum up opposition to Smith in the 1830s and that the 1826 court record was possibly a forgery and at best questionable as a document. But other records emerged in the 1970s and 1980s confirming that Smith had been involved in money digging." (Pg. 68)
"While some of those questioning the (Book of Mormon's) historical origins have suggested that the Church should formally repudiate the Book of Mormon, many people wisely have seen such a response as an overreaction. Contrary to the position that the Book of Mormon must be an authentic history of a central group of ancient peoples in America or it must be a hoax, a more 'catholic' middle position can be adopted that emphasizes the powerful message for the present-day LDS Church and the world as a whole." (Pg. 75-76)
"It is impossible to identify the precise level of (Joseph) Smith's involvement with the Danites---such as how many meetings he attended or how actively he directed their activities." (Pg. 102)
"A number of important historiographic essays during the 1960s and '70s examined what the new ways of explaining the past meant for Mormon history. Of concern to many Latter-day Saint historians was the trend toward secularization of what in preceding decades had been a faith-promoting history. While lauding the shift away from polemics, these students of the past often cautioned against the paucity of a purely secular approach. Practitioners of the New Mormon History sought a middle ground that invited frankness tempered by fairness." (Pg. 117)
"The Mormon Church has cut back on paper trails. The last complete Church census ... was conducted in 1950, but only selected results were published. While the Church has continued to survey its members to identify demographic and belief patterns, nearly all of these studies have been restricted to headquarters use." (Pg. 183)
"Ironically, what might be called 'faithful history,' which screens out Mormonism's difficult and controversial episodes, frequently tries the faith of uninformed Saints who hear problematic stories from other sources." (Pg. 321)
"New Mormon historians have steadfastly taken the position that establishing and confirming faith are religious questions, not historical questions and that history must limit itself to the tasks of reconstructing and interpreting the past that are its proper job. This position has obviously disquieted some General Authorities..." (Pg. 373)
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