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William Faden and Norfolk's Eighteenth Century Landscape: A Digital Re-Assessment of his Historic Map ePub download

by Andrew Macnair,Tom Williamson

  • Author: Andrew Macnair,Tom Williamson
  • ISBN: 1905119348
  • ISBN13: 978-1905119349
  • ePub: 1649 kb | FB2: 1721 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Europe
  • Publisher: Windgather Press; Pap/DVD edition (October 23, 2010)
  • Pages: 218
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 611
  • Format: lrf azw rtf doc
William Faden and Norfolk's Eighteenth Century Landscape: A Digital Re-Assessment of his Historic Map ePub download

William Faden's map of Norfolk, published in 1797, was . This book, with accompanying DVD, presents a new digital version of the map, and explains how this can be interrogated to produce a wealth of new historical information.

William Faden's map of Norfolk, published in 1797, was one of a large number of surveys of English counties produced in the second half of the eighteenth century.

William Faden's map of Norfolk, published in 1797, was one of a large number of surveys of English counties .

He is the author of Ancient Trees in the Landscape: Norfolk's Arboreal Heritage, The Origins of Hertfordshire, and William Faden and Norfork’s Eighteenth Century Landscape: A Digital Re-assessment of His Historic Map. Библиографические данные. Hertfordshire: A Landscape History. Anne Rowe, Tom Williamson.

Find nearly any book by Andrew Macnair. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers

Find nearly any book by Andrew Macnair. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Founded in 1997, BookFinder.

of the Norfolk landscape many centuries before the map was surveyed, as well . The book includes a digital version of the map, on DVD.

This innovative study employs digitisation techniques and GIS technology to coax a wealth of significant new information from an important eighteenth-century map; William Faden's survey of Norfolk, published in 1797. It also shows how - when combined with other datasets - interrogation of the various patterns and distributions which it shows can cast a shaft of new light on the development of the Norfolk landscape many centuries before the map was surveyed, as well as telling us a great deal about the contemporary, late-eighteenth century landscape, and how this was understood, exploited and experienced.

Jefferys, Thomas, William Faden, and Mary Sponberg Pedley. William Faden and Norfolk's 18th century landscape: a digital re-assessment of his historic map. Bollington: Windgather. The map trade in the late eighteenth century: letters to the London map sellers Jefferys and Faden. Oxford: Voltaire Foundation.

This book is about the map of an English county – Hertfordshire – which was published in 1766 by two London mapmakers, Andrew Dury and John Andrews

This book is about the map of an English county – Hertfordshire – which was published in 1766 by two London mapmakers, Andrew Dury and John Andrews. For well over two centuries, from the time of Elizabeth I to the late 18th century, the county was the basic unit for mapping in Britain and the period witnessed several episodes of comprehensive map making. The map which forms the subject of this book followed on from a large number of previous maps of the county but was greatly superior to them in terms of quality and detail.

He is the author of Ancient Trees in the Landscape: Norfolk's Arboreal Heritage, The Origins of Hertfordshire, and William Faden and Norforkâ?™s Eighteenth Century Landscape: A Digital Re-assessment of His Historic.

He is the author of Ancient Trees in the Landscape: Norfolk's Arboreal Heritage, The Origins of Hertfordshire, and William Faden and Norforkâ?™s Eighteenth Century Landscape: A Digital Re-assessment of His Historic Map. You may also be interested i. Notice:The articles, pictures, news, opinions, videos, or information posted on this webpage (excluding all intellectual properties owned by Alibaba Group in this webpage) are uploaded by registered members of Alibaba. If you are suspect of any unauthorized use of your intellectual property rights on this webpage, please report it to us at the following:ali-guideice.

William Faden and Norfolk’s 18th-century Landscape. 225 years of ordnance survey. The article contains some corrections from the original.

William Faden and Norfolk's 18th-century landscape. Hondius is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake

William Faden and Norfolk's 18th-century landscape. Oxford: Windgather Press. Hondius is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. One of the notable figures in the Golden Age of Dutch/Netherlandish cartography, he helped establish Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century. Aaron Arrowsmith (1750–1823) was an English cartographer, engraver and publisher and founding member of the Arrowsmith family of geographers.

William Faden's map of Norfolk, published in 1797, was one of a large number of surveys of English counties produced in the second half of the eighteenth century. This book, with accompanying DVD, presents a new digital version of the map, and explains how this can be interrogated to produce a wealth of new historical information. It discusses the making of the Norfolk map, and Faden's own career, within the wider context of the eighteenth-century "cartographic revolution". It explores what the map, and others like it, can tell us about contemporary social and economic geography. But it also shows how, carefully examined, the map can also inform us about the development of the Norfolk landscape in much more remote periods of time. The book includes a digital version of the map, on DVD. Andrew Macnair is Research Fellow at the School of History in the University of East Anglia; Tom Williamson is Professor of History and Head of the Landscape Group at the University of East Anglia.