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The Hundred Years War (British History in Perspective) ePub download

by Anne Curry

  • Author: Anne Curry
  • ISBN: 0333531752
  • ISBN13: 978-0333531754
  • ePub: 1363 kb | FB2: 1751 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Europe
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (July 1993)
  • Pages: 208
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 536
  • Format: docx rtf doc mobi
The Hundred Years War (British History in Perspective) ePub download

Curry, Anne (2003) The Hundred Years' War (British History in Perspective series). ISBN 978-0-333-92435-8.

The Fifteenth Century: Concepts and Patterns of Service in the Later Middle Ages (vol. 1: Fifteenth Century). The Boydell Press (UK). ISBN 978-0-85115-814-3. Curry, Anne (2003) The Hundred Years' War (British History in Perspective series). Curry, Anne (2005) The Parliament rolls of Medieval England 1275-1504. Boydell & Brewer (UK). Agincourt: A New History.

Anne Curry, an English expert on the Hundred Years War, brings her considerable knowledge of the subject to bear in Osprey's .

Anne Curry, an English expert on the Hundred Years War, brings her considerable knowledge of the subject to bear in Osprey's Essential Histories volume Quite simply, this volume is a tour de force in that the author presents a complex subject with insight and depth. This is one of the best volumes that Osprey published in 2002.

The Hundred Years War book. Start by marking The Hundred Years War (British History in Perspective) as Want to Read

The Hundred Years War book. Start by marking The Hundred Years War (British History in Perspective) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The name the Hundred Years’ War has been used by historians since the beginning of the nineteenth century to describe the long conflict that pitted the kings and kingdoms of France and England against each other from 1337 to 1453

The name the Hundred Years’ War has been used by historians since the beginning of the nineteenth century to describe the long conflict that pitted the kings and kingdoms of France and England against each other from 1337 to 1453

Includes bibliographical references (pages 179-183) and index. 1. The Hundred Years War and historians

The Hundred Years War grew out of these earlier clashes and their consequences.

The Hundred Years War grew out of these earlier clashes and their consequences. England's King John lost Normandy and Anjou to France in 1204. His son, Henry III, renounced his claim to those lands in the Treaty of Paris in 1259, but it left him with Gascony as a duchy held under the French crown. The English kings’ ducal rights there continued to be a source of disquiet, and wars broke out in 1294 and 1324. Henry V probably had fewer than 7,000 men at Agincourt, Talbot at Castillon maybe 6,000.

The ‘Hundred Years War’ is, strictly speaking, an invention of historians In: The Hundred Years War. British History in Perspective.

The ‘Hundred Years War’ is, strictly speaking, an invention of historians. The phrase ‘Guerre de Cent Ans’ first occurs in print in France in 1861, and was soon taken up with enthusiasm in England. In: The Hundred Years War.

Although the term 'Hundred Years War' was not coined until the 1860s, the .

Although the term 'Hundred Years War' was not coined until the 1860s, the Anglo-French conflicts of the later Middle Ages have long been of interest to historians. The Hundred Years War British History in Perspective Essential histories (Том 19). Anne Curry provides a straightforward narrative of English involvement in France, placing the well known military events in their diplomatic context.

Hundred Years’ War, intermittent struggle between England and France in. .By permission of the British Library. Hostilities in the Hundred Years’ War began at sea, with battles between privateers.

Hundred Years’ War, intermittent struggle between England and France in the 14th–15th century over a series of disputes, including the question of the legitimate succession to the French crown. By convention it is said to have lasted from 1337 to 1453, but there had been periodic fighting since the 12th century. The assembly decided in favour of the count of Valois, who became king as Philip VI. Edward III protested vigorously, threatening to defend his rights by every possible means. Edward III did not disembark on the Continent until 1338.

Velan
Any review of this book would have to start out by stating that it is part of Osprey Publishing’s “Essential Histories”. As such, it is very short, at only 93 or so pages of text. In addition, of these 93 pages, very crudely a third consist of illustration of one type or another (i.e., maps, contemporaneous tapestries and paintings, photos of battlefields, etc.). Another few pages are dedicated, as is common to this series, to “portraits of civilians”. Hence the book’s formats limits the narrative of the war to, very roughly, about 45 or so pages of text. Considering the length of the war and its complexity, one would consider the book just because of the limits imposed on it by its format, to be of limited value. After all, wars that were much shorter and less complicated in nature had many volumes of “essential histories” books dedicated to them. For example, the US Civil War has 4 volumes in this series dedicated to it, and the first, second and Napoleonic wars about 5 each. This reviewer, upon reading the book, was pleasantly surprised to see that the book did a pretty good job (4.5-star rating in this reviewer’s opinion).

One of the reasons for this high rating is the author’s extreme knowledge of the time. She is a Professor of History specializing in the period and has written quite a few books on the periods (including a full-length book on the topic, “The Hundred Years War” [highly recommended for those who desire a more in-depth narrative]). She provides the reader with a very good and succinct narrative on the war. This includes not only a narrative of the war itself but also to the factors behind it as well as to, implicitly, the factors that lead to French victory (i.e., France’s larger economic base and adoption of a professional armed force as well as adoption of gunpowder). It should be emphasized however, that this narrative and analysis is extremely bare-boned. Not surprising considering the limitations imposed by the too short length of the series it is part of. Nevertheless, it hits all the essential and most important factors of the war on the head. Highly recommended for someone who is a novice and desires to get up to speed in the 2 or so hours it takes to read this book.

For those interested in more details this reviewer highly recommends two other books. For the knowledgeable of history of this period, Anne Curry’s book mentioned above, “The Hundred Years War”, is highly recommended. For those who less knowledgeable (i.e., laymen), this reviewer highly recommends Desmond Seward’s “The Hundred Years War: The English in France 1337-1453” (for those interested in more details on the latter book please see my review on it – probably a bit too lengthy but should give the potential reader enough information to help them determine whether or not it is worth purchasing). Seward’s book is one of the most widely read on the subject.This reviewer also recommends David Nicole's "The Fall of English France 1449–53" . This is part of Osprey's "Campaign" series and, as a result covers the conflict during this time purely from a military perspective but it provides a very good history of the military campaigns that ended the war (this reviewer has written a review of that too for anyone interested).
Macage
This is a very complete book of the Hundred Years War for as brief a book as it is. However, I have found that the book is much more useful in its role as a reference after my initial reading of the book. The maps and the chronologies that are in many if not all of the books of the Essential Histories series published by the Osprey Publishing Company make these books excellent reference materials as a person reads other books on the same or related subject matter.
Adrierdin
Interesting, but not as good as her other book.
JUST DO IT
A god brief summary of the 100 years war.
Sharpbringer
If you think of the Hundred Years War, epic English victories like Crecy, Poitiers and Agincourt would probably come to mind. However despite these impressive military triumphs, the fact is that the French ultimately won the series of wars that stretched out over a 116-year period. Anne Curry, an English expert on the Hundred Years War, brings her considerable knowledge of the subject to bear in Osprey's Essential Histories volume #19. Quite simply, this volume is a tour de force in that the author presents a complex subject with insight and depth. Unlike some of the other volumes in this series, The Hundred Years War 1337-1453 represents a real research effort and not just a condensation of other sources. This is one of the best volumes that Osprey published in 2002.
As usual, The Hundred Years' War 1337-1453 begins in standard Osprey format with a short introduction, a chronology, a background to the war and the opposing sides and how the war began. The narrative of the war itself is 38 pages in length. Final sections are portrait of a soldier (one French and two English), the cruel nature of the war (attacks on civilians, raids on England), portrait of a civilian (the remarkable female poet and historian Christine de Pizan), how the war ended and conclusions. The author has provided a substantial bibliography as well as genealogical tables for both the French and English nobility. There are a total of ten maps (English lands in Gascony, campaigns in Northern France in 1340, campaigns in the north in 1341-1359, the campaign of 1346, the campaigns of the Black Prince, the second phase of the war, the Agincourt campaign, campaigns of 1415-1428, English garrisons in Normandy, and the defeat of the English) in this volume and they add great value.
The Hundred Years War was unusual for its protracted nature, although this was frequently interrupted by truces. The English, who began the war with modest objectives and expanded them when fortune favored their cause, crushed one French army after another in the early phases of the war. Much of French fell under English control by 1415 and it appeared that the French monarchy was in eclipse. Anne Curry does a wonderful job detailing how the French gradually turned the war around, beginning with the incredible campaigns of Joan of Arc. The French were not the complete blockheads that recurrent defeats would suggest, but were capable of learning from past mistakes. During the 1430s, the French monarchy oversaw the creation of the first standing army in Europe since the Romans. The French were also quick to adopt and efficiently organize artillery, which was used to help smash English armies at Formigny and Castillon (battles that are all but forgotten but which helped to decide the war). The author also does a splendid job detailing the war finances and economies of both sides. French revenue grew ten-fold during the course of the war as the French monarchy organized a robust tax system. However, the English fought the war on an economic shoestring and their revenues declined as the war dragged on. Indeed, the English often conquered land that was devastated and incapable of producing revenue for some time. In the end, the English lacked the money to sustain large armies in France and they were eventually overwhelmed. The author rightly calls this war a defining moment in European history, where large standing armies become possible and royal authority was forced to construct more complex fiscal structures than had existed under parochial feudalism.
Agalas
This is a great concise 90 page overview of the Hundred Years War.Lots of pictures and maps.The War is broken up into 4 different phases showing how it changed from the first to the last phases with the English finally pushed out.If the French could take any consolation,the Wars of the Roses broke out in 1450 as a direct result of the Hundred Years Wars. Unfortunately however the French had their own civil war which also came about from the Hundred Years War,but at least the major English armies were tied to their own islands.The only good it seems that came about was the final extinguishing of continental land claims by English Kings.These claims were in existence since the time of William the Conqueror and even before.Instead of using war outright as policy to keep an influence on the continent,the English will now use diplomacy and politics to maintain a continental influence. War comes only when the other 2 fail.At any rate England will refuse to be isolated and continental ties are the lifeline.This is a well researched pamphlet style book,a superb general overview.
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