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The Crannogs of Scotland: An Underwater Archaeology (Revealing History) ePub download

by Nicholas Dixon

  • Author: Nicholas Dixon
  • ISBN: 075243151X
  • ISBN13: 978-0752431512
  • ePub: 1257 kb | FB2: 1112 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Europe
  • Publisher: Tempus; 1st edition (August 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 168
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 188
  • Format: doc txt lrf mbr
The Crannogs of Scotland: An Underwater Archaeology (Revealing History) ePub download

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Underwater archaeology paints a dramatic picture of life in the prehistoric past

Underwater archaeology paints a dramatic picture of life in the prehistoric past. The public perception of underwater archaeology is usually related to shipwrecks and yet there are thousands of submerged settlement sites from all periods. This book explains the methods of working underwater and the exciting discoveries from a number of sites in Scotland. Format Paperback 176 pages.

The Crannogs of Scotland: An underwater archaeology. Tempus Publishing, Limited. Scotland After the Ice Age: Environment, Archaeology and History, 8000 BC–1000 AD. New York: Wiley & Sons. a b c Armit, Ian (1996). The Archaeology of Skye and the Western Isles. Edinburgh University Press. National Handbook of Underwater Archaeology. The Springer Series in Underwater Archaeology. The History of a Scottish Lowland Crannog: Excavations at Buiston, Ayrshire", 1989–90, STAR Monograph 4, AOC/Historic Scotland, Edinburgh. a b O'Sullivan, . Sands, R. (2005). Impressive, well-appointed, rich and enigmatic: Collure Demense crannog, Lough Derravaragh, County Westmeath".

Underwater excavation at Ederline crannog, Loch Awe, Argyll, Scotland. The crannogs of Scotland: An underwater archaeology. International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, 34, 282–298. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Cavers, . Crone, . Engl, . Fouracre, . Hunter, . Robertson, . & Thoms, J. (2011). Dean, . Ferrari, . Oxley, . Redknap, . & Watson, K. (Ed.

The history of a Scottish lowland crannog: Excavations at Buiston . What can this shifting figure reveal about the Seal Wife topos, and the changing landscape of folklore in the twentieth century? View full-text.

Archaeology underwater: The NAS guide to principles and practice. Microscopic views of Swiss Lake Villages.

The public perception of underwater archaeology is usually related to shipwrecks, and yet there are thousands of submerged settlement sites from all periods. This book explains the methods of working under water and the exciting discoveries from a number of sites in Scotland.

The highest concentrations of crannógs (in Scotland) are found in several lochs within Dumfries and Galloway region, although many have . A variant of the crannóg was the island roundhouse

The highest concentrations of crannógs (in Scotland) are found in several lochs within Dumfries and Galloway region, although many have been found in the highlands as well. In the Grampian Highlands a well known crannóg was built by the Burnetts of Leys, whose family thence moved nearby to the present 16th century Crathes Castle. A variant of the crannóg was the island roundhouse. Built on a small, rocky island in a lochan and usually reached by means of a causeway, these are extremely common in the Western Isles. The visible remains are most often those of a dún, although there are examples of full broch towers occupying some sites.

Watch a video tour with Nicholas Dixon of the Scottish Trust for Underwater Archaeology, talking . A "Crannóg", a very old form of Scottish housing

Watch a video tour with Nicholas Dixon of the Scottish Trust for Underwater Archaeology, talking about the reconstructed Oakbank Crannog. How British is Scotland? Archaeological Origins of Scotland’. A "Crannóg", a very old form of Scottish housing. The remains of crannógs can be found on almost all major Scotland lochs & were used in ancient times (& as late as the century) as a means of defensive dwellings.

The public perception of underwater archaeology is usually related to shipwrecks, and yet there are thousands of submerged settlement sites from all periods. Most of these lie in shallow waters and are therefore readily available to the underwater archaeologist. This book explains the methods of working under water and the exciting discoveries from a number of sites in Scotland. The focus is the excavation of the Early Iron Age crannog in the Highlands of Scotland.
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