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Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses (Women, Power and Politics) ePub download

by Barbara Yorke

  • Author: Barbara Yorke
  • ISBN: 0826460402
  • ISBN13: 978-0826460400
  • ePub: 1946 kb | FB2: 1532 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Europe
  • Publisher: Leicester University Press; 1 edition (June 16, 2003)
  • Pages: 224
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 992
  • Format: mbr lrf docx lit
Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses (Women, Power and Politics) ePub download

The book also looks at the opportunities the nunneries provided for royal . Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses (Women, Power and Politics Series).

Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses is the first book to examine in detail a distinctive group of female religious communities which were founded by royal families and usually commanded by princesses and queens. The book also looks at the opportunities the nunneries provided for royal women to exercise the types of public power and authority that in the early middle ages were often the preserve of me. . 0826460402 (ISBN13: 9780826460400).

Other books in this series. Women and the Politics of Schooling in Victorian and Edwardian England. Barbara Yorke is Professor of Early Medieval History at King Alfred's College, Winchester

Other books in this series. Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses. Barbara Yorke is Professor of Early Medieval History at King Alfred's College, Winchester. Previous books include Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England (1990) and Wessex in the Early Middle Ages (1995).

Kings and kingdoms of early Anglo-Saxon England' - subject(s): Kings and rulers, Anglo-Saxons, History. The conversion of Britain' - subject(s): Church history, History.

Saxon Villages l Saxon Houses. We know what Saxons houses may have looked like from excavations of Anglo Saxon villages, such as the one at West Stow in the east of England. The Anglo-Saxons did not understand the Roman ways and would not live in their towns, so the villas, streets and baths were soon forgotten. They fell into ruins and became covered over with weeds. Roman houses were made of brick or stone and had a tiled roof. Here, an early Anglo-Saxon village (. 20-650AD) has been carefully reconstructed where it was excavated. Using clues from the what was discovered, archeologists have reconstructed the houses as they may have looked about 1,500 years ago.

By the late Anglo-Saxon period almost all newly founded nunneries were founded by royal patronage Barbara Yorke.

By the late Anglo-Saxon period almost all newly founded nunneries were founded by royal patronage. Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses is the first book to examine in detail a distinctive group of female religious communities which were founded by royal families and usually commanded by princesses and queens. Although the author recognizes that facets of their history can be viewed in common with that of other ecclesiastical houses in Anglo-Saxon England, she is particularly interested in what made them different.

The Anglo-Saxon World by M. J. Ryan Paperback £1. 2. A discusssion of Anglo-Saxon kingship prior to 600 AD, and an introduction to the main classes of documentary evidence supplements individual treatment of each kingdom. The final chapter draws the conclusions together and deals with the four main facets of kingship in this period: kingship and overlordship; royal resources; royal and noble families; king and church.

Nunneries and Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses. Signs of Devotion: The Cult of St. V Blanton. Progress and Promise': The German Empire in the Mid Eleventh Century: 3. Social stratification and the structure of government in the Ottonian and Salian period 4. Rex et sacerdos - the priestly kingship of Henry III (1039-56) 5. Strengths and weaknesses of Salian kingship 6. Henry III as Roman patricius and the German popes 7. The beginnings and aims of church. reform 8. The distance from the rest of Europe: France, England and the North Part III. From Christus Domini to Antichrist: The King of Germany and the Investiture Contest: 9. The reign of Henry IV and its consequences 10.

Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses. Continuum International, 2003. She presented "King Alfred and the traditions of Anglo-Saxon kingship" at the 2011 Toller Lecture

Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses. The Conversion of Britain: Religion, Politics and Society in Britain, 600-800. She presented "King Alfred and the traditions of Anglo-Saxon kingship" at the 2011 Toller Lecture. Yorke"s publications include: Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England. Wessex in the Early Middle Ages. Continuum International, 1995. Bishop Aethelwold: His Career and Influence. The Boydell Press, 1997.

The role of women Anglo-Saxon society was decidedly patriarchal, but women were in some ways better off than they would be in later times. A woman could own property in her own right. She could and did rule a kingdom if her husband died

The role of women Anglo-Saxon society was decidedly patriarchal, but women were in some ways better off than they would be in later times. She could and did rule a kingdom if her husband died. She could not be married without her consent and any personal goods, including lands, that she brought into a marriage remained her own property. If she were injured or abused in her marriage her relatives were expected to look after her interests. Related: Early Anglo-Saxon Britain Also see Anglo-Saxon London in our London History section.

By the late Anglo-Saxon period almost all newly founded nunneries were founded by royal patronage. This detailed study, which traces the histories of royal nunneries in the 7th and 8th centuries, examines how they differed from other types of religious communities in terms of their organisation, status, special secular and ecclesiastical features and the authority and power which the abbess and other women held. Barbara Yorke reveals how the royal nunneries were not only subject to the changing fortunes of the Church and state, but also to the successes and failures of the royal houses that patronised them. This particular group of nunneries is also compared and contrasted with the variety of other arrangements available to religious women, both within and outside of convents and male religious establishments, and with gender and societal norms.
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