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The Great Raid: Rescuing the Doomed Ghosts of Bataan and Corregidor (Movie Tie-In-Edition) ePub download

by William B. Breuer,Barry McCaffrey

  • Author: William B. Breuer,Barry McCaffrey
  • ISBN: 1401360017
  • ISBN13: 978-1401360016
  • ePub: 1954 kb | FB2: 1817 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Asia
  • Publisher: Miramax; New edition edition (August 17, 2005)
  • Pages: 258
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 765
  • Format: lrf rtf lrf mbr
The Great Raid: Rescuing the Doomed Ghosts of Bataan and Corregidor (Movie Tie-In-Edition) ePub download

The Great Raid film will be showing in theatres across North America starting on August 12, and the screenplay is co-written by Miramax author William B. Breuer and Hampton Sides.

The Great Raid film will be showing in theatres across North America starting on August 12, and the screenplay is co-written by Miramax author William B.

The Great Raid book I was browsing Netflix and saw a movie called The Great Raid starring James Franco, Benjamin Bratt, and others.

Before General Douglas MacArthur could fulfill his stirring promise. William B. Breuer recounts in searing, meticulous detailbased largely on interviews with survivorsthe hellish battles of Bataan and Corregidor; the horrors of the Bataan death march; and the harrowing efforts of guerilla fighters. I was browsing Netflix and saw a movie called The Great Raid starring James Franco, Benjamin Bratt, and others. I saw what the movie was about and thought "This should be a great movie!" It wasn't. The story, however, was.

Fourteen of his books have been selections of the Military Book Club. He lives in Cleveland, Tennessee.

I just recently saw the movie The Great Raid and it made everything come alive. Seeing how the prisoners of war were treated horrified me.

book by William B. Breuer. On the morning of January 28th 1945, a band of American rangers and Filipino scouts raided a notorious Japanese prison camp to liberate incarcerated American soldiers. These men rescued 511 POWs and escorted the sick prisoners through 30 miles of jungle to safety. I just recently saw the movie The Great Raid and it made everything come alive.

William B. Breuer recounts in searing, meticulous detail, based largely on interviews with survivors-the hellish . And, as retired four-star general Barry McCaffrey asserts in his introduction, The Great Raid is an "important book for our current military and political leaders to read. Breuer recounts in searing, meticulous detail, based largely on interviews with survivors-the hellish battles of Bataan and Corregidor, the horrors of the Bataan Death March, and the harrowing efforts of guerilla fighters.

It tells about the greatest rescue mission in the history of US Army: the rescue of 511 . That's not all, this book also tells about the horror of the Bataan Death March after the US surrender to Japan in Corregidor & Bataan.

It tells about the greatest rescue mission in the history of US Army: the rescue of 511 POWs by US Rangers, Alamo Scout and Phillipine guerillas from the horrible Camp Cabanatuan during the World War II. I'm sure everybody knows about MacArthur's famous words: I shall return.

That's not all, this book also tells about the horror of the Bataan Death March after the US surrender to Japan in Corregidor & Bataan. He escaped to Australia while waiting in vain for the US government's decision to reinforce his troops (which was neglected eventually because they wanted to concentrate to demolish Hitler).

We relive the hellish battles for Bataan and Corregidor, where in 1942 American and Filipino soldiers fought bravely to hold.

The Great Raid on Cabanatuan: Rescuing the Doomed Ghosts of Bataan and Corregidor. by William B. We relive the hellish battles for Bataan and Corregidor, where in 1942 American and Filipino soldiers fought bravely to hold back the Japanese invasion force. We experience firsthand the horrors of the Bataan Death March on which tens of thousands of prisoners lost their lives en route to Cabanatuan.

Breuer recounts in searing, meticulous detail the full story of this thrilling.

The Great Raid on Cabanatuan: Rescuing the Doomed Ghosts of Bataan and Corregidor (Audiobook) by William B. Breuer English September 19, 2005 ASIN: B000BHHRCQ [email protected] kbps 8h 40m 236 MB English September 19, 2005 ASIN: B000BHHRCQ [email protected] kbps 8h 40m 236 MB Narrator: Patrick Lawlor. A small band of Army Rangers set out on a daring rescue effort: to penetrate thirty miles into Japanese-controlled territory, storm the camp, and escape with the POWs, carrying them if necessary. Breuer recounts in searing, meticulous detail the full story of this thrilling true-life adventure and inspiring testament to American heroism and grit.

Author:Breuer, William B. Book Binding:Paperback. World of Books Ltd was founded in 2005, recycling books sold to us through charities either directly or indirectly. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. We appreciate the impact a good book can have by Breuer, William B. Paperback. 39. 9 rub. 89. 3 rub. + 32. 6 rub p&p. Unexplained Mysteries of World War II by Breuer, William B. Paperback Book The. 45. 0 rub. Undercover Tales of World War II by Breuer, William B. Paperback Book The Cheap. 32. 97. 7 rub.

The Great Raid film will be showing in theatres across North America starting on August 12, and the screenplay is co-written by Miramax author William B. Breuer and Hampton Sides. The movie stars Benjamin Bratt, Joseph Fiennes, James Franco, Connie Nielsen and Martin Csokas. The Great Raid is a must-have for fans of WWII books. Breuer expands on the information in the bestselling Ghost Soldiers with descriptions of the military efforts of Gen. MacArthur operating from Australia from 1942-1945, and much more on the clandestine operations in Cabanatuan Town. Throughout the book are powerful, first-person recollections from the men who ran the underground operations in the Philippines, as well as the families back home receiving news that their loved ones survived.
Kegal
Buy the book. Read the book. Then, buy the movie. Watch the movie depicting this true story about the heroic and incredibly daring rescue of prisoners of war remaining in a camp near Cabanatuan on the main island of Luzon, the Phillipines, towards the end of WWII. This is a compelling saga of the decision by middle management military officers, based upon reports that General MacArthur's invasion to retake the Phillipines was being used by the occupying Japanese Imperial Army to eliminate all prisoners held in camps throughout the islands, to immediately plan and execute a military rescue operation to save these defenseless people. In early 1942, the Japanese army conquered the Phillipines and took approximately 92,000 Filipino, American, and a collection of emigres from all over the world prisoner, after completing the destruction of defending forces at Bataan and Corregidor. The Bataan Death March is legendary. You must read about it. After almost three years of captivity, with the American military engaged in retaking the islands with their landings at Leyte and rescue imminent, the few remaining prisoners probably were unaware that the Japanese High Command had ordered that all prisoners be killed and their remains covered up in mass graves to hide the deeds. Prisoners who managed to escape from another camp encountered elements of the advancing liberators and described to them the horrors they had witnessed and the plans the Japanese had to exterminate the remaining human vermin. Word passed up the chain of command and the decision was made, planning ensued, and the rescue operation undertaken...undertaken by people you might never have heard about, if not for what they accomplished here.
A year before this book was written to accompany the movie of the same name, Hampton Sides wrote a book covering the same raid called "Ghost Soldiers." This book pretty much sticks to recounting the details of the raid, while "The Great Raid" provides peripheral details important to create background about the people involved in a broader sense in surviving, helping others to survive, a country held captive by an imperialistic aggressor.
This story, these books, are important to me because my Uncle Jeff Smith was one of the soldiers rescued from this camp. On the death march, a grinning Japanese soldier broke his back with a sharp rifle butt thrust. He was lucky to have survived. He never once talked about the experience to his extended family, never told who had carried him the sixty miles from Bataan to Cabanatuan, never shared any part of that experience. Although he married, they had no children. Jeff and my father had a younger brother, Paul, who was killed in Europe leading his platoon against an enemy machine gun emplacement in 1944. My father served with the Army's Eighth Air Force in England for three years. I served six years during the Viet Nam Era, having qualified in submarines, nuclear power school, at Guam aboard the U.S.S. Proteus (AS-19) and San Diego on U.jS.S. Sperry (AS-12). The men and women of my family know about the horrors of war and what service to country truly means.
I have no love, no regard for educators at all levels who poison the minds of our children by propagandizing them against this country in school facilities built and maintained by American Taxpayers and re-inventing the story of America by claiming we have been an imperialistic nation. These intellectual parasites are like the cur in the story which bites the hand that feeds it. These books, this movie, and so many others tell the stories our children need to know. Buy the books and movies. Share them with your children. Provide them with honorable models to emulate.
Voodoozragore
This was a gift. I was told by my history buff that it was excellent.
Uriel
I thoroughly enjoyed the book. It taught me a good deal about McArthur that I did not know. I never thought much of him but now realize that politics was alive and well during WWII.
Topmen
Like many people, I read and generally enjoyed the 2001 bestseller Ghost Soldiers: The Epic Account of World War II's Greatest Rescue Mission. What I didn't realize when I picked up this earlier book, was that it covers almost the exact same material, but in a much less engaging way. (It should be noted that both books owe a huge debt to Forrest Johnson's 1978 book Hour of Redemption: The Heroic WW II Saga of America's Most Daring POW Rescue, a debt acknowledged in Ghost Soldiers but not by this book.) Here, Breuer provides a workmanlike account of the post-Pearl Harbor political and military context that led to the U.S. "abandonment" of the Philippines, its subsequent fall to Japan, and the horrific fate of the US and Filipino soldiers taken prisoner. He similarly sketches out the spy network that operated under Japanese occupation, the regrouping of U.S. forces as the war in Europe wound down, and the planning and execution of the titular raid to free 511 POWs.

This material all more or less overlaps with Ghost Soldiers but isn't nearly as well written. Breuer has a penchant for trite melodramatic phrasing, and tends to repeat information over and over and over as if his reader has no memory. It also doesn't help that instead of simply writing "three Rangers did X", he writes, "John Q. Doe of Springfield, IL, James R. Doe of Anywhere, WY, and Jesse T. Doe of Plainview, MI did X." I certainly understand his desire to honor every solider he can by naming them, but it makes for very awkward reading. Another small tick that bothered me was that if any soldier had played college football, that merited mention -- but only football, no other sport. Why? Finally, his interviews with veteran POWs and Rangers seemed to yield little more than the most banal of anecdotes and recollections and their inclusion, again, while honoring them, really doesn't help the book's readability.

Unfortunately, behind the weak writing lurk bigger flaws. Foremost of these is a total lack of explanation as why it was deemed so crucial to mount a dangerous, complex, behind-enemy-lines mission to rescue the POWs. Breuer repeats a number of times that it was feared that the Japanese would massacre the POWs, but never tells what foundation that fear rested on. The reader is left to conclude that it was all basically hearsay based on the notion that the Japanese might do it for reasons of revenge as they retreat. This contrasts poorly with Ghost Soldiers, which explains that the U.S. Army's knew of one such massacre (the Palawan Massacre, in which American POWs were burned alive by retreating Japanese), and thus there was a very real fear guiding the raid at the climax of the book. The book also suffers somewhat from Breuer's agenda to lionize Douglas MacArthur and vilify Roosevelt and the "faceless Washington bureaucrats" (can someone please retire this trite phrase?). This is somewhat redeemed by his drawing attention to the massively heroic efforts of Filipino soldiers at the side of the Americans, and their subsequent total betrayal when it came to due honors and compensation from the U.S. government.

However, in the end, there's no reason to read this version of history when Ghost Soldiers is available -- unless you're really really interested in the Pacific Campaign. There's so much overlap between the two that all you'd be getting is different emphases. Related books that might be worth checking out are Silent Warriors of World War II: The Alamo Scouts Behind the Japanese Lines and Manila Espionage, Claire Phillips account of her life as the ringleader of an Allied spy ring in the Philippines (later made into the forgettable film I Was An American Spy).
Endieyab
This book was fantastic. There isn't a better told story of rescue and heroism. I couldn't put it down.
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