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The Ancient Olympics ePub download

by Nigel Spivey

  • Author: Nigel Spivey
  • ISBN: 0199602697
  • ISBN13: 978-0199602698
  • ePub: 1551 kb | FB2: 1158 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Ancient Civilizations
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 2nd ed. edition (July 13, 2012)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 803
  • Format: lit mbr mobi rtf
The Ancient Olympics ePub download

Spivey's prose is always full of flavour and The Ancient Olympics must rate as one of the most enjoyable and intelligent books about the ancient Greeks currently on the market.

Spivey's prose is always full of flavour and The Ancient Olympics must rate as one of the most enjoyable and intelligent books about the ancient Greeks currently on the market. -James Davidson, Daily Telegraph. crammed with information about the sporting events themselves" -The Spectator.

Nigel Jonathan Spivey (born 16 October 1958) is a British classicist and academic, specialising in classical art and archaeology. He is a senior lecturer in classics at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of Emmanuel College. He has written extensively on the Etruscans and on the Olympic Games. As an undergraduate, he was a three-time champion at the Oxford-Cambridge athletics match and he remains an active member of the Achilles Club, an Oxbridge sports organization.

Nigel Spivey paints a portrait of the Greek Olympics as they really were - fierce contests between bitter rivals, in which victors won kudos and rewards, and losers faced scorn and even assault. Victory was almost worth dying for, and a number of athletes did just that

Nigel Spivey paints a portrait of the Greek Olympics as they really were - fierce contests between bitter rivals, in which victors won kudos and rewards, and losers faced scorn and even assault. Victory was almost worth dying for, and a number of athletes did just that. Many more resorted to cheating and bribery. Contested always bitterly and often bloodily, the ancient Olympics were not an idealistic celebration of unity, but a clash of military powers in an arena not far removed from the battlefield.

The Ancient Olympics: War Minus the Shooting by Nigel Spivey 296pp, Oxford, £1. 9. It is ironically appropriate that the mythical stables (or rather farmyards) of Augeas were situated on the future site of the sanctuary of Zeus at Olympia. The story was that Augeas never used to clean out the stinking, insalubrious dungyards of his huge cattle herds; eventually Hercules turned up and diverted the local river to wash out the accumula tions of slurry. While he was at it, he inaugurated the Olympic Festival, at least according to one of several founding myths.

The Ancient Olympics Spivey, Nigel Oxford Academ 9780199602698 Найджел Спайви: Древние олимпийские игры : The word athletics is derived from the Greek verb to struggle for a prize.

The Ancient Olympics book. Indeed, the Olympics were not so much a graceful display of Greek beauty as a war fought by other means. Nigel Spivey paints a portrait of the Greek Olympics as they The word "athletics" is derived from the Greek verb "to struggle or to suffer for a prize.

The word 'athletics' is derived from the Greek verb 'to struggle for a prize'. After reading this book, no one will see the Olympics as a graceful display of Greek beauty again, but as war by other means. Nigel Spivey paints a portrait of the Greek Olympics as they really were - fierce contests between bitter rivals, in which victors won kudos and rewards, and losers faced scorn and even assault. Many more resorted to cheating and bribery

Includes bibliographical references (p. 252-264) and index.

Includes bibliographical references (p. War minus the shooting' - In training for beautiful goodness - The programme of agony - Sweet victory - The politics of contest - Olympia: the origins - Olympia: the afterlife. The word "athletics" is derived from the Greek verb "to struggle or to suffer for a prize.

Just in time for the Summer Olympics, a fresh new history of the games that begot all of today's quadrennial pomp . Spivey dispels much of the romance surrounding the competitions.

Just in time for the Summer Olympics, a fresh new history of the games that begot all of today's quadrennial pomp, circumstance, competition, and urine-testing. They occurred during the hottest parts of the year and offered only the most primitive arrangements for drinking, bathing, and relieving oneself; the games were, he says, a notoriously squalid experience for athletes and spectators alike. Describing each event, the author reminds us that in those ancient competitions only winning signified; there were no awards for runners-up. He reminds us, too, that some of our current Olympic traditions are quite new.

The word 'athletics' is derived from the Greek verb 'to struggle for a prize'. After reading this book, no one will see the Olympics as a graceful display of Greek beauty again, but as war by other means.Nigel Spivey paints a portrait of the Greek Olympics as they really were - fierce contests between bitter rivals, in which victors won kudos and rewards, and losers faced scorn and even assault. Victory was almost worth dying for, and a number of athletes did just that. Many more resorted to cheating and bribery. Contested always bitterly and often bloodily, the ancient Olympics were not an idealistic celebration of unity, but a clash of military powers in an arena not far removed from the battlefield.