» » Nothing to Tell: Extraordinary Stories of Montana Ranch Women

Nothing to Tell: Extraordinary Stories of Montana Ranch Women ePub download

by Donna Gray

  • Author: Donna Gray
  • ISBN: 0762779098
  • ISBN13: 978-0762779093
  • ePub: 1580 kb | FB2: 1193 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: TwoDot; First edition (May 1, 2012)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 658
  • Format: lrf rtf lit doc
Nothing to Tell: Extraordinary Stories of Montana Ranch Women ePub download

Linda Peavy and Ursula Smith have co-authored ten books, including Pioneer Women and Women in Waiting in the Westward Movement.

Nothing to Tell book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Nothing to Tell: Extraordinary Stories of Montana Ranch Women as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Linda Peavy and Ursula Smith have co-authored ten books, including Pioneer Women and Women in Waiting in the Westward Movement.

Download Nothing to Tell: Extraordinary Stories of Montana Ranch Women.

Extraordinary Stories of Montana Ranch Women.

Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781493000913, 1493000918. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780762779093, 0762779098. Extraordinary Stories of Montana Ranch Women. Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Print ISBN: 9780762779093, 0762779098.

Subtitle: "Extraordinary Stories of Montana Ranch Women". USA Today's Best-Selling Books List. 1. Dog Man: For Whom the Ball Rolls. 2. Where the Crawdads Sing.

Nothing to tell : extraordinary stories of Montana ranch women. Kittredge, William (1992). Hole in the sky : a memoir. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Allen, Frederick (2005). Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press. Dimsdale, Thomas J. (1915).

Women of the American wild west had to be a resourceful lot to cope with the elements that surrounded them: the harsh conditions .

Women of the American wild west had to be a resourceful lot to cope with the elements that surrounded them: the harsh conditions, lawlessness. This is a women sheriff of the old B/W Photo Colourised by Pearse. Introduction to oedipus rex essay test Study Guide to Bernard Knox's Introductions to Sophocles' Oedipus the King. Southern Women Farmhouse Vintage Display Woodworking Projects Plans Teds Woodworking Old Farm Houses Couple Photos Chicken Houses Aunt.

In retelling their life stories, Gray steps aside and allows theses women with supposedly nothing to tell to speak for .

In retelling their life stories, Gray steps aside and allows theses women with supposedly nothing to tell to speak for themselves. Pride, nostalgia, and triumph fill a dozen hearts as they realize how remarkable their lives have been and wonder how they did it all. Some of these women grew up in Montana in one-bedroom houses; others traveled in covered wagons before finding a home and falling in love with Montana.

Sara Cone Bryant (1873-? ), later Mrs. Borst was the American author of various childrenâ?s book in the early 20th century, including: How to Tell Stories to Children and Some Stories to Tell (1905),. You can read How to Tell Stories to Children, And Some Stories to Tell by Bryant Sara Cone in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Sitting at the kitchen tables of twelve women in their eighties who were born in or immigrated to Montana in the late nineteenth or early twentieth century, between 1982 and 1988 oral historian Donna Gray conducted interviews that reveal a rich heritage.  In retelling their life stories, Gray steps aside and allows theses women with supposedly “nothing to tell” to speak for themselves.  Pride, nostalgia, and triumph fill a dozen hearts as they realize how remarkable their lives have been and wonder how they did it all. 

Some of these women grew up in Montana in one-bedroom houses; others traveled in covered wagons before finding a home and falling in love with Montana.  These raw accounts bring to life the childhood memories and adulthood experiences of ranch wives who were not afraid to milk a cow or bake in a wooden stove.  From raising poultry to raising a family, these women knew the meaning of hard work.  Several faced the hardships of family illness, poverty, and early widowhood.  Through it all, they were known for their good sense of humor and strong sense of self. 

Kirinaya
I got this book because I was lucky enough to cowboyed for the woman who had the last story in the book. Her name was Bea Murray. i was cowboying for her around about the same time she was being interviewed. Although I dint know it at the time. All the stories are special. Considering what these women went through to live in that rough country way back when, they all still felt happy and pleased that they lived the way they did.
Qane
I'm torn between a three-star and a four-star review on this one ... the book has some great stories and I really really like the way the "voices" of the women were maintained, you could hear the inflection and hesitation that came through as they spoke and remembered their lives, and that was important and meaningful - but I felt the editing was poor in a lot of ways. So many times the stories being told were obviously cut off - and it was impossible to tell if the woman telling the story stopped or if Donna Gray decided to cut the story short. Additional commentary to tell us "she suddenly cut off and changed to another story" or "the rest of the story was unintelligible" or "she asked me not to share the ending of this story publically due to the people still being alive' or whatever would have been less jarring. Also, in one story SO MUCH of the story was in brackets and rewritten by the editor with no explanation - at least in the ebook version (there are a few footnotes at the back of the eversion, so I'm assuming that there are no footnotes to explain this heavy editing in the paper version? I don't know.) It was distracting and disappointing - again, I'd like to have had an explanation as to why entire sentences ore more were in brackets - it wasn't just a case of giving us context of a name where the speaker said "she" or somesuch.

That said - the stories told were varied, the lives shared were amazing, and I loved that each one ended with an explanation of when the interviews were done and how much longer the woman lived before her death. These women are an inspiration - to have lived, raised families, and thrived in such environments, with so little and with such amenities is amazing. I know I would have struggled mightily (actually with my health issues I'm not sure I'd have survived but that's neither here nor there). And I'm very glad, in the end, that Ms. Grey took the time to sit with this women and get them to open up and share their "nothings" because it definitely turned out to something worth reading.
Daron
I really enjoyed this. It was an interesting look into a not to distant past time wise but worlds apart from how we live today. But then I enjoy reading about the lives of actual people in times past. I never liked history much but I do now & am eager to learn more. I think doing my genealogy has had something to do with that since reading about specific people rather than just generalities of a time period make them all come alive. The history becomes much more meaningful then. It was amazing to read how different things were even in the 1940s out in rural Montana compared to how they were on the East coast where I grew up just a little later than that.
RUsich155
I love this book. I am now 70 years old and remember my mother and my grandmother telling me stories like this. My grandmother was a product of the depression and my mother was born in 1919. This gave me great insight as to what they went throughin Iowa on the farm. My grandmother and her sisters had Many Adventures on the farm and was an expert with the wood stove. Toward the end of the depression they lost the farm and move to California. And their Adventures continued. This book has inspired me to write down some of the stories that they told me as I grew up. I have some wonderful old old pictures to include. Much much thanks to these authors who have inspired me so much and brought back so many wonderful memories.
Grillador
Absolutely wonderful! You can hear the voices of these remarkable, ordinary women as they tell their life stories. Born in the late 1800s and early 1900s, these women lived life in its essential bareness. Wood stoves, washboards, carrying water, no electricity, no indoor plumbing, tending chickens, milk cows, horses, hogs, gardening, canning, hunting, branding cattle, bearing children: they did it all. And their voices remind us to count our blessings, to enjoy our families and our friends, to recognize the extraordinary in the ordinary. We in the 21st century are so spoiled! I will never again complain about my "heavy workload." I eagerly read each story, and then was sad to come to the end. Highly recommended.
Jorad
listening to the voices of the story tellers colored the picture of their lives in a soft way, like a water color captures a sunset. It was a little slow at first then captured me in the middle of the book. The end seemed like the author ran out of printer ink, it just stopped. If there was something deeper to the final narration I missed it. Nice read though, I would recommend if you want a new look at the life of our early days as a white woman settling the west. It is not a complete picture of the times though, just these women's stories and how hard it was for them.
Kieel
This is a collection of interviews with women who all lived in a small area in Montana. They didn't know each other particularly but each interview describes life during their life times. The time frame of most women were born in the late 1800's. Several of them died as late as the early 2000's. Each interview describes the hardships that was every day life for these women that any woman today would not want to endure. It describes living in the Great Depression and the aftermath of that as well as day to day life during their lives. None of these women thought their lives were remarkable.
E-Books Related to Nothing to Tell: Extraordinary Stories of Montana Ranch Women: