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One Nation, Divisible: How Regional Religious Differences Shape American Politics (Religion by Region) ePub download

by Andrew Walsh,Mark Silk

  • Author: Andrew Walsh,Mark Silk
  • ISBN: 0742558452
  • ISBN13: 978-0742558458
  • ePub: 1930 kb | FB2: 1882 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (June 27, 2008)
  • Pages: 288
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 493
  • Format: txt mbr lrf doc
One Nation, Divisible: How Regional Religious Differences Shape American Politics (Religion by Region) ePub download

Mark Silk and Andrew Walsh's One Nation, Divisible: How Regional Religious . This book is the last publciation in a series titled "Religion by Region.

Mark Silk and Andrew Walsh's One Nation, Divisible: How Regional Religious Differences Shape American Politics does just that. Regional differences in religion and politics matter in America, but showing it and doing it with data, interpretation and occasional pithiness is welcome. I found Silk and Walsh's analysis fresh, unique, and determinative for the case that they make: regional differences matter, both in terms of religious majorities in each region and the unique regional and cultural ecologies. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion).

Request PDF On Mar 1, 2009, JAMES K. WELLMAN and others published ONE NATION, DIVISIBLE: HOW REGIONAL .

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Mark Silk is a professor of religion in public life at Trinity College (Hartford .

Northwest, regional religious differences have a dramatic impact on public life no. .How Regional Religious Differences Shape American Politics.

One Nation, Divisible : How Regional Religious Differences Shape American Politics. by Mark Silk and Andrew Walsh.

Regional differences among American Jews. Silk, Mark, and Andrew Walsh. One nation divisible: How regional religious differences shape American politics. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. In Papers in Jewish demography 1989, eds. U. O. Schmelz, S. DellaPergola, 104–112.

One Nation, Divisible shows how geographical religious diversity has shaped public culture in eight distinctive regions of the country and how regional differences influence the debate around critical national issues. One Nation, Divisible. Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group Inc.

From the evangelical South to Catholic New England to the 'unchurched' Pacific Northwest, regional religious differences have a dramatic impact on public life not only in the regions themselves but also in the United States as a whole. As the interplay between religion and politics continues to dominate public discussion, understanding regional similarities and differences is key to understanding the debate around such national issues as health care, immigration, and the environment. For the first time, One Nation, Divisible shows how geographical religious diversity has shaped public culture in eight distinctive regions of the country and how regional differences influence national politics. Examining each region in turn, Mark Silk and Andrew Walsh provide historical context, stories that reveal the current cultural dynamics, and analyses of current politics to create rounded portraits of each region. They then present a compelling new account of the evolution of national religious politics since World War II. In doing so, they suggest that the regional religious forces that have fueled recent culture wars may be giving way to a less confrontational style rooted in different regional realities.
Vudojar
This book is the last publciation in a series titled "Religion by Region." The book in the series on religion in the Pacific Northwest (a.k.a "The None Zone") has been a hot topic of discussion among Mainline Protestants in that region. I have found the books in the series very informative, employing the scholarly work of historians, geographers, sociologists, theologians/social scientists, journalists and people with an artistic background. When I first looked at this text, I was a bit surprised that the primary editor of the series, Mark Silk, turned the interpretation of regional religious differences toward politics--mostly because politics weren't necessarily covered in the individual books about religion in each region. Learning more about Silk's other publications, I'm not so surprised about this turn. This topic is applicable for this election year, which I'm sure will sell a few more books. However, I was looking for a little more interpretation regarding what was broadly learned about the research about regional religious differences from several years of research and writing. The American political application seems timely, but I was hoping that more could be gleaned. I was going to read this book regardless of the angle--the books in the series are valuable teaching and reference tools. One Nation, Divisible is an excellent text, using politics that could bring the concept of regional religious differences to a wider audience. I was hoping for a more broad interpretation of religion by region than merely American politics.
Faegal
This book does have some good insights on how religion shapes politics, especially in the "Southern Crossroads" region, being more conservative and more politically active than the Old South. Since the Crossroads is the driver of the modern GOP of the last 15 years, that alone makes this book worth reading.

That said, I have a criticism of the geographic divisions and, if I'm following another person correctly, it applies to this whole series, not just this book.

First, in a couple of cases, divisions should be made within states. Three come immediately to mind.
1. Northern Missouri belongs in the Midwest, not the Crossroads. Its German Catholicism, especially in St. Louis, and its German Lutheranism, just aren't part of the "Crossroads."
1A. Kansas is really becoming a Crossroads state more than a Midwest one.
2. The Boise area and the Panhandle areas of Idaho probably should be carved out of the Mountain West and attached to the Pacific North West.
3. Northern Virginia is really becoming more and more part of the Middle Atlantic and not the South.

As you read this book, or any in this series, I guess, you might have to do some mental filtering for this.

Otherwise, this is a decent book.
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