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Texans in the Confederate Cavalry (Civil War Campaigns and Commanders Series) ePub download

by Anne J. Bailey

  • Author: Anne J. Bailey
  • ISBN: 1886661022
  • ISBN13: 978-1886661028
  • ePub: 1763 kb | FB2: 1315 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: State House Press; 1St Edition edition (January 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 96
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 447
  • Format: lit doc lrf txt
Texans in the Confederate Cavalry (Civil War Campaigns and Commanders Series) ePub download

Start by marking Texans in the Confederate Cavalry as Want to Read . This is the picturesque story of their battles and skirmishes where the often outnumbered cavalry, through bravado or sheer madness, frequently helped turn the tide of battle.

Start by marking Texans in the Confederate Cavalry as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. from Colonel Parsons' assault on the Federal Navy during the Red River Campaign of 1864 to Terry's Texas Rangers with General Wheeler's horsemen tirelessly badgering Sherman on his "March to the Sea," it's. A lively and picturesque narration by a respected historian.

He is also the author of 20 Good Reasons to Study the Civil War and Sam Bell Maxey and the Confederate Indians . Having the good fortune of hearing John C. Waugh at the Austin Civil War Roundtable, I discovered this series "Civil War Campaigns and Commanders.

He is also the author of 20 Good Reasons to Study the Civil War and Sam Bell Maxey and the Confederate Indians, other McWhiney Foundation Press titles. on less frequently treated topics that are quite intriguing.

Texas Rangers had patrolled on horseback since the early days of the Republic. Texas military heritage, born in a revolution from Mexico in the 1830s and maturing in the Mexican-American War of the 1840s, shaped all who lived there. Now, years later, a handful of these veterans and a generation raised in this heritage would make a colorful and heroic contribution to the Civil War as unique and independent "horse soldiers.

Texas military heritage, born in a revolution from Mexico in the 1830s and maturing in the Mexican-American War of the 1840s, shaped all who lived there. Civil War Campaigns and Commanders Series. State House/McWhiney Foundation Press.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Texans in the Confederate Cavalry.

Civil War regiments were rarely near authorized strength so that they were commonly brigaded with two to four other regiments. Two to four brigades were combined into divisions. By the end of the war, 272 cavalry regiments were formed in the Union Army and 137 in the Confederate Army. The first officer to make effective use of the Union cavalry was Major General Joseph Hooker, who in 1863 consolidated the cavalry forces of his Army of the Potomac under a single commander, George Stoneman.

Much of the Civil War west of the Mississippi was a war of waiting for .

Much of the Civil War west of the Mississippi was a war of waiting for action, of foraging already stripped land for an army that supposedly could provision itself, of disease in camp, while trying to hold out against Union pressure. There were none of the major engagements that characterized the conflict farther east. Instead small units of Confederate cavalry and infantry skirmished with Federal forces in Arkansas, Missouri, and Louisiana, trying to hold the western Confederacy together. The many units of Texans who joined this fight had a second objective - to keep the enemy out of their home state by placing themselves "between the enemy and Texas.

Assigned to duty by E. Kirby Smith. Incomplete appointments. State militia generals. The Confederate and United States processes for appointment, nomination and confirmation of general officers were essentially the same. The military laws of the United States required that a person be nominated as a general officer by the president and be confirmed by the Senate and that his commission be signed and sealed by the president.

American Civil War, four-year war (1861–65) fought between the United States and 11 Southern states that seceded to form the Confederate States of America. It arose out of disputes over slavery and states’ rights. When antislavery candidate Abraham Lincoln was elected president (1860), the Southern states seceded. American Civil War, also called War Between the States, four-year war (1861–65) between the United States and 11 Southern states that seceded from the Union and formed the Confederate States of America. Gettysburg, Battle ofThe Battle of Gettysburg (1863), lithograph by Currier & Ives. Library of Congress, Washington, .

Find nearly any book by ANNE J BAILEY. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Valor and Lace: The Roles of Confederate Women 1861-1865 (Journal of Confederate History Series). ISBN 9781889332017 (978-1-889332-01-7) Softcover, Stackpole Books, 1997.

Anne J. Bailey has written: 'A photographic history of Georgia in the Civil War' - subject(s): Georgia Civil War, 1861-1865, History, Pictorial works, United States Civil War, 1861-1865 'Texans in the Confederate cavalry'. Bailey has written: 'A photographic history of Georgia in the Civil War' - subject(s): Georgia Civil War, 1861-1865, History, Pictorial works, United States Civil War, 1861-1865 'Texans in the Confederate cavalry' - subject(s): Cavalry operations, Confederate States of America, Confederate States of America. Cavalry, Confederate States of America. Texas Cavalry, History, Texas Civil War, 1861-1865, United States Civil War, 1861-1865 'The Chessboard of War'. Asked in US Civil War, War and Military History, US Civil War Generals. How was cavalry units used in the US Civil War?

Texas Rangers had patrolled on horseback since the early days of the Republic. Texas military heritage, born in a revolution from Mexico in the 1830s and maturing in the Mexican-American War of the 1840s, shaped all who lived there. Now, years later, a handful of these veterans and a generation raised in this heritage would make a colorful and heroic contribution to the Civil War as unique and independent "horse soldiers." This is the picturesque story of their battles and skirmishes where the often outnumbered cavalry, through bravado or sheer madness, frequently helped turn the tide of battle . . . from Colonel Parsons' assault on the Federal Navy during the Red River Campaign of 1864 to Terry's Texas Rangers with General Wheeler's horsemen tirelessly badgering Sherman on his "March to the Sea," it's all here. A lively and picturesque narration by a respected historian.
Gardataur
This book is good for what little it contains, but it is a very small book (thin) and does not go into any kind of depth on the subject. The cover photo is worth the cost of the book, however. This is just a product review, not a a criticism of the seller. The seller was great.
Forey
Great book
LivingCross
I was not always proud of these fellow Texans but I commend the author for writing the history both good and bad. An excellent read!
Drelahuginn
Anne J. Bailey has authored an interesting history of Texans who served in the Texas Cavarly during the Civil War from 1861 to 1865. The book is a good overview of the unique men who made up the Confederate Cavarly from Texas. These men were "rough and ready" when the Civil War began. The men from Texas were by and large "raised in the saddle" and became outstanding horseman due to their background. Texas is a harsh and tough place in many ways, and the men who were born and raised in Texas had to rely on their horse to travel fast when needed, herd cattle for market, defend their homesteads, and protect their families. When Texas seceeded from the United States in 1861, thousands of Texans joined the Confederate cause and enlisted in the cavarly regiments. It is remarkeable that more Texans enlisted in the cavalry than the infantry, and some had to be turned away because of the many filled cavarly regiments. The officers who led these cavarly regiments defnitely had remarkeable lives before and after the war. The author gives a brief biography of the fascinating Texans who led their regiments. The brief biography of the leaders in this book are:
- Oran M. Roberts - Edward Clark - Francis R. Lubbock - Sam J. Richardson - Benjamin Franklin Terry - J.K.P. Blackburn - John Austin Wharton - Andrew J. Smith - David D. Porter - William Henry Parsons - Nathaniel M. Burford - Thomas O. Selfridge - Nathaniel P. Banks - Xavier B. Debray - William P. Hardeman . Many of these officers became Texas legends before, during, and after the Civil War and are still regarded fondly throughout the Lone Star state today.
The Texas Cavalry became a very important part of the brigades throughout the Confederacy, especially in the Western Theatre of the War where most of them served. During the campaigns of the western theatre of the Civil War, the Texas Cavarly Regiments became feared throughout the Union Army of the Cumberland and the Union Army of the Ohio. During the Red River Campaign in 1864, the Texas Cavarly Regiments were a key factor in the victories the Confederate Army waged against the Union.
The chapters in this short read (95 pages) include:
- Mounted Texans Go to War
- The Lone Star Cavalryman
- The Independent Texas Trooper
- "Texians" in the Red River Campaign
- "Lone Star Horsemen and the U.S. Navy
- Fighting in the Louisiana Bayous
- Confederate Cavarly and the Texas Frontier Tradition
- Further Reading
- Index
Throughout this interesting read the author describes the tough living conditions the cavalrymen endured. Most of the men had to supply their own horses, food, and supply and could not rely on the Confederate Goverment to give the regiments adequate supplies. It was considered shameful if a cavarlyman's horse was killed and couldn't be replaced quickly. The Texas soldiers were outstanding marksmen as well and were noted for firing at the enemy at a full gallop. Not in the book, but an interesting fact is that the grandfather of the 36th President Lyndon B. Johnson, was a Texas Cavalryman (Sam Ely Johnson Sr.) in the 26th Texas Cavalry Regiment (DeBray's Regiment) and fought heroically throughout the Red River Campaign.
This short read is an excellent introduction to anyone who is interested in the Texas Confederate Cavalry Regiments in the Civil War. It is a good overview of the regiments and men and makes a good "launching off point" to read more detailed books about individual regiments that were from Texas. This is a book that I recommend to anyone interested in Texas Confederate history, Texas History, the Civil War in the Western Theatre, and the Civil War in general. RECOMMENDED!
Jugami
You can probably find no more colorful soldiers than those representing the Confederacy from Texas. Ms. Bailey presents an interesting overview of these individuals, often overlooked as they were confined to the obscure Trans-Mississippi department. The presentation of this material, however, seemed to be somewhat disjointed with much content seeming to repeat rather often. I felt that there was so much more to learn about these intriguing and colorful individuals that could have been more thoroughly investigated, even given the restrictive limitations of this introductory overview. Furthermore, a few inaccuracies exist, such as with the illustration presented for David Dixon Porter, which in reality is actually a picture of his brother, William D. "Dirty" Dixon. Being confused for his brother would have created much consternation to David Dixon, as William Dixon was often a source of great anxiety and concern for the Dixon family. Nonetheless, for a quick review of Texan Cavalry participation in the Civil War, especially that of the Trans-Mississippi Confederacy, this title serves satisfactorily as a basic beginning point, prior to more in-depth examinations.
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