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Moments of Despair: Suicide, Divorce, and Debt in Civil War Era North Carolina ePub download

by David Silkenat

  • Author: David Silkenat
  • ISBN: 0807834602
  • ISBN13: 978-0807834602
  • ePub: 1681 kb | FB2: 1297 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (March 7, 2011)
  • Pages: 296
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 513
  • Format: txt azw doc lrf
Moments of Despair: Suicide, Divorce, and Debt in Civil War Era North Carolina ePub download

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In Moments of Despair, David Silkenat explores these shifting sentiments

In Moments of Despair, David Silkenat explores these shifting sentiments. Antebellum white North Carolinians stigmatized suicide, divorce, and debt, but the Civil War undermined these entrenched attitudes, forcing a reinterpretation of these issues in a new social, cultural, and economic context in which they were increasingly untethered from social expectations. Black North Carolinians, for their part, used emancipation to lay the groundwork for new bonds of community and their own interpretation of social frameworks. Silkenat argues that North Carolinians' attitudes differed from those.

During the Civil War era, black and white North Carolinians were forced to. .InMoments of Despair, David Silkenat explores these shifting sentiments.

During the Civil War era, black and white North Carolinians were forced to fundamentally reinterpret the morality of suicide, divorce, and debt as these experiences became pressing issues throughout the region and nation.

Silkenat argues that the Civil War fundamentally changed southern culture for both black and white North Carolinians. Using suicide, debt, and divorce as tools of measurement, he traces these changes and the significant impact they had on society.

InMoments of Despair, David Silkenat explores these shifting sentiments

InMoments of Despair, David Silkenat explores these shifting sentiments. Black North Carolinians, for their part, used emancipation to lay the groundwork for new bonds of community and their own interpretation of social frameworks

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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. During the Civil War era, black and white North Carolinians were forced to fundamentally reinterpret the morality of suicide, divorce, and debt as these experiences became pressing issues throughout the region and nation. In Moments of Despair, David Silkenat explores these shifting sentiments. Antebellum white North Carolinians stigmatized suicide, divorce, and debt, b During the Civil War era, black and white North Carolinians were forced to fundamentally reinterpret the morality of suicide, divorce, and debt as these experiences became pressing issues throughout the region and nation. In Moments of Despair, David Silkenat explores these shifting sentiments

My first book, Moments of Despair: Suicide, Divorce, and Debt in Civil War Era North Carolina (UNC Press, 2011), explored shifting moral sentiments in North Carolina over the course of the 19th century, and was awarded the North Caroliniana Society Book Award for the best non-fiction.

My first book, Moments of Despair: Suicide, Divorce, and Debt in Civil War Era North Carolina (UNC Press, 2011), explored shifting moral sentiments in North Carolina over the course of the 19th century, and was awarded the North Caroliniana Society Book Award for the best non-fiction book of 2011. I have also published articles on labor at the World’s Columbian Exposition, Populism, female education in the Civil War South, African Americans’ historical memory of Abraham Lincoln during the 1930s, and the origins of the 'scourged back' photo.

In Moments of Despair, David Silkenat explores these shifting sentiments. ISBN13: 9780807834602.

During the Civil War era, black and white North Carolinians were forced to fundamentally reinterpret the morality of suicide, divorce, and debt as these experiences became pressing issues throughout the region and nation. In Moments of Despair, David Silkenat explores these shifting sentiments.Antebellum white North Carolinians stigmatized suicide, divorce, and debt, but the Civil War undermined these entrenched attitudes, forcing a reinterpretation of these issues in a new social, cultural, and economic context in which they were increasingly untethered from social expectations. Black North Carolinians, for their part, used emancipation to lay the groundwork for new bonds of community and their own interpretation of social frameworks. Silkenat argues that North Carolinians' attitudes differed from those of people outside the South in two respects. First, attitudes toward these cultural practices changed more abruptly and rapidly in the South than in the rest of America, and second, the practices were interpreted through a prism of race. Drawing upon a robust and diverse body of sources, including insane asylum records, divorce petitions, bankruptcy filings, diaries, and personal correspondence, this innovative study describes a society turned upside down as a consequence of a devastating war.
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A well researched, well written, and interesting book about a depressing topic. This is an academic book with 33 pages of footnotes, 30 pages of bibliography, an appendix, maps, and an index. It has no photographs. It is a combination of economic, legal and psychiatric history mixed in with racial and sex components. I recommend it for academics, mental health professionals and lawyers. Do not despair for there were those back then who were happy, content, prosperous and successful in their marriage and business. This book reminds me of of some of the work of legal historian James Willard Hurst. It is interesting to consider that with the end of slavery, the debt incurred by some slave owners in purchasing their "property" before the abolition was not abolished and was still owed. So the former slave owner still owed the debt and the entity or person that made the loan could not seize the collateral.

The author sets out one example of suicide as follows:

A 1892 suicide note, printed in the News and Observer:

I married a widow with a grown up daughter. My father visited our house very often, fell in love with my step daughter and married her. So my father became my son-in-law, and my step daughter my mother, because she was my father's wife. Some time afterward wife had a son- he was my father's brother-in-law and my uncle, for he was the brother of my stepmother. My father's wife, i.e. my stepdaughter, had also a son. He was, of course, my brother, and in the meantime my grandchild, because he was the son of my daughter. My wife was my grandmother, because she was my mother's mother. I was my wife's husband and grandchild at the same time. And, as the husband of a person's grandmother is his grandfather, I was my own grandfather.

The newspaper observed that the writer "can scarcely be blamed for killing himself under the circumstances."
Bev
It is not often I find a social history that is fun to read, one that grabs my attention and holds it the way a good battle history can. This book manages to do that while being very informative and giving the reader an understanding of these issues in North Carolina. While focused in one state many of the attitudes are common throughout the South. This provides us with a detailed examination of the subject that carries into the larger picture. The author has an easy to read informative style that is almost conversational. However, he manages to provide a lot of information at the same time.
The book covers approximately 1840 to 1910. A period of great change both socially and financially throughout the state. This tight focus allows detailed consideration of the attitudes of both Blacks and Whites on each item. This provides a unique look at the changes emancipation bring to the Black community. Credit in the Antebellum White community is a personal concern between friends acting as gentleman. Debit as understood in Northern financial circles is foreign to them. The hyperinflation of the Civil War and emancipation placed strains on this community that I had not considered until reading this book. Throughout the book are "fun facts" that both advance the discussion and add value. As an example, Indiana has the most liberal divorce laws in the 1850s. Emancipation did not wipe out the debts incurred purchasing slaves.
Organized into sections of about 70 pages each, with a chapter on the subject prior to the war. Two chapters cover how the war affects the subject and changes after the war. A fourth chapter looks at the overall issue during the period covered. Each chapter presents the views of the White and Black community presenting a comprehensive discussion of the subject. This provides sufficient space to present a quality discussion without bogging down in details.
This excellent book is a social history of the changing attitudes toward Suicide, Divorce, and Debt. It is a personal look at the South, how the people lived and the affects of the war. Overall, it is a fun and informative read providing background information that will help us understand both Secession and Reconstruction.
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