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Canada's First Nations: A History of Founding Peoples from Earliest Times ePub download

by Olive Dickason

  • Author: Olive Dickason
  • ISBN: 0771028008
  • ISBN13: 978-0771028007
  • ePub: 1252 kb | FB2: 1523 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: McClelland & Stewart (May 8, 1992)
  • Pages: 640
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 479
  • Format: mbr txt mbr lrf
Canada's First Nations: A History of Founding Peoples from Earliest Times ePub download

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Throughout her distinguished career she has remained proud of her Métis heritage. David T. McNab is an Associate Professor of Native Studies at York University. He has written widely on the topics of Aboriginal history and literature, Aboriginal land and treaty rights, British imperial history, Canadian history, and Ontario history.

Canada's First Nations:A History of Founding Peoples from Earliest Times. Dickason, Olive Patricia (1995). The Native imprint : the contribution of First Peoples to Canada's character, volume 1 : to 1815. University of Oklahoma Press. Athabasca University Educational Enterprises.

Canada's First Nations book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

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Canada's First Nations uses an interdisciplinary approach-drawing on. .

Olive Dickason's widely acclaimed history of Canada's founding peoples is augmented by David McNab's updates and in-depth examination of recent events, including the Ipperwash inquiry and global warming's effect on Innu of Canada's the north. She is the author of several books, including The Myth of the Savage (1984, 1997) and, with . Green, The Laws of Nations and the New World (1989).

First Nations : A History of Founding Peoples from Earliest Times .

Canada's First Nations : A History of Founding Peoples from Earliest Times. by Olive Patricia Dickason. Canada's First Nations is a comprehensive history of Canada's original inhabitants, Indians, Inuit, and later, Metis. Using an interdisciplinary approach combining techniques from History, Anthropology, and Archaeology, Dickason tells the story of the more than 50 First Nations in theterritory that is now Canada.

DICKASON, Olive Patricia, Canada's First Nations.

Volume52, Issue3, hiver 1999, p. 410–412. DICKASON, Olive Patricia, Canada's First Nations. A History of Foundings Peoples from Earliest Times (Don Mills, Oxford University Press, 1997), 590 . Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française, volume 52, number 3, hiver 1999, p. APA. Delage, D. (1999).

Canada's first nations by Olive Patricia Dickason, October 8, 2001 . Canada's First Nations. A History of Founding Peoples from Earliest Times.

Canada's First Nations. Published October 8, 2001 by Oxford University Press, USA. That people were living in the Americas during the later Ice Ages is no longer debated; what is not agreed on is when the movement from the Old World to the New began.

Olive Dickasons widely acclaimed history of Canadas founding peoples . Arthur Ray charts the history of Canada’s Native people from first contact to current land claims.

Olive Dickasons widely acclaimed history of Canadas founding peoples is augmented by David McNabs updates and in-depth examination of recent events, including the Ipperwash inquiry and global warmings effect on Innu of Canadas the north. This text describes how Canadas Aboriginal peoples were radically altered by the arrival of Europeans. This book examines both the historic and contemporary Canadian culture of extraction, with essays, interviews, archival material, and multimedia visualizations.

Olive Dickason, David T. McNab. Olive Dickason's widely acclaimed history of Canada's founding peoples is augmented by David McNab's updates and in-depth examination of recent events, including the Ipperwash inquiry and global warming's effect on Innu of Canada's the north. This text describes how Canada's Aboriginal peoples were radically altered by the arrival of Europeans.

From the point of view of Canada's native peoples, this country has 57 founding nations, not just two. Canada's First Nations is an exploration of the experience of these peoples from their first appearance among the giant mammals that once roamed the land to their confrontations with contemporary Canada. Aboriginal peoples have displayed both ingenuity and flexibility in their survival techniques. Their achievements in technology (the toggling harpoon, the canoe), and in the plant sciences (the development of maize, their herbal lore), have come to benefit the world. Their cooperation and assistance was essential for the European exploration and settlement of what is now Canada: the value of this aid in economic terms alone has never been assessed. Relying on archaeological, artistic, and linguistic evidence, Dickason explores Amerindian cultural traditions and values that were influential in developing the country's national and international personality. The book speculates that the rapid spread of aboriginal settlement throughout North and South America and the richness of culture must have been the result of complex trade patterns which included the capability to cross oceans. In the historic period, it is evident that far from being simply overwhelmed, Amerindians often adapted to colonial pressures in their own ways, sometimes mustering for wars in which their guerilla-like tactics were both original and often ferociously effective, but more often diplomatically playing off opposing French, English or American forces. But this is not a history of impersonal forces. It is the record of such people as Pontiac, Joseph Brant, Tecumseh, Abe Okpik, Elijah Harper, Poundmaker, and Big Bear. While the history of Canada's native peoples is also the history of the exploitation of the North American continent, it also reveals the recreation of the native community in the fight for land claims, self-government, and recognition of aboriginal rights.
Whitecaster
Canada's First Nations is a solid piece of scholarship detailed enough to satisfy advanced historians and well written in order to please a greater audience.

Make no mistake, this is a vast topic covering 15.000 years in history and pre-history that had to be shrunk to 560 pages only. Of course there are a few omissions, of course there needed to be some sort of selection of incidents and sources. Most of the author's choice regarding her focus can be understood easily and makes the book a good read.

The only grave criticism of which the author cannot be spared is that at some places Dickason does not sufficiently question her ancient written sources, but rather takes for granted what has been said about amerindian behavioural patterns in the 16th and 17th century.

While this can be attributed to the vast undertaking itsself, it nonetheless may be one wrong approach to sources leading to a perhaps distorted picture of amerindian ancient culture.

One example: "All Iroquoians practised torture and cannibalism"...[56].
While the first can be regarded as proven, sources related to the alledged latter behaviour are definetely not to be taken at face value, as Heidi Peter-Röcher (Kannibalismus in der Prähistorischen Forschung, Studien zu einer paradigmatischen Deutung und ihren Grundlagen.) in her doctoral thesis of 1994 (University FU Berlin) quite convincingly points out.

In fact, as Peter-Röcher succeeded to show, remarks related to cannibalism have to be taken with utmost care. Peter-Röcher goes as far as questioning the existence of such a practise in history at all and relates that there is not one single case in history when such a practise has been positively witnessed, that is neurotic missionaries - themselves living under a constant threat of getting slain - made up these stories of "Gog and Magog" in order to illustrate their braveness among the barbarians, to put it short.

Despite these flaws Canada's First Nations is a solid piece of work well worth the time it takes to read it.
Kata
This is an excellent book, which can be used as an encyclopedia for the history, traditional names, and geographical location of the Canadian Native peoples. The author has used numerous primary sources and maps and her style is very readable. Dickason gave also the aboriginal perspective of many events but in a very balanced account. The book can grasp the attention not only to professional historians dealing with Native history but also to all readers who have some general interest in the past of Canada's Amerindians.
Celore
This book is a wonderful synthesis of Canadian aboriginal history. I was impressed by the author's detailed and well-balanced approach. It is neither a moral fable nor a panegyric of conquerors' exploits, but rather history as it should be told. The only downside is the book's episodic style but that is necessitated by its ambitious goal. Olive Dickason did an especially good job highlighting the different histories of Canada's natives both pre- and post-contact.
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