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Are We There Yet?: The Golden Age of American Family Vacations (CultureAmerica) ePub download

by Susan Sessions Rugh

  • Author: Susan Sessions Rugh
  • ISBN: 0700615881
  • ISBN13: 978-0700615889
  • ePub: 1487 kb | FB2: 1373 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas; 1st edition (June 12, 2008)
  • Pages: 252
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 160
  • Format: txt lrf txt docx
Are We There Yet?: The Golden Age of American Family Vacations (CultureAmerica) ePub download

Download PDF book format. Personal Name: Rugh, Susan Sessions. Uniform Title: Culture America.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Are we there yet : the golden age of American family vacations Susan Sessions Rugh. Publication, Distribution, et. Lawrence Uniform Title: Culture America. Rubrics: Families vacations United States History 20th century Social aspects National characteristics, American Families. Download now Are we there yet : the golden age of American family vacations Susan Sessions Rugh. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Chronicling this innately American ritual, Susan Rugh presents a cultural history of the American middle-class family vacation from 1945 to 1973, tracing its evolution from the establishment of this summer tradition to its decline. The first in-depth look at post-World War II family travel, Rugh's study recounts how postwar prosperity and mass consumption-abetted by paid vacation leave, car ownership, and the new interstate highway system-forged the ritual of the family road trip and how that ritual became entwined with what it meant to be an American.

Rugh describes the obstacles that black Americans faced when they too wanted to be part of The Golden Age of. .This is a very good book looking at a specific time in American history: the family vacation from about the post-World War II era to about the 1970s.

Rugh describes the obstacles that black Americans faced when they too wanted to be part of The Golden Age of American Family Vacations. This was the era when families loaded up the family station wagon and went out on road trips to see the United States.

Are we there yet?: the golden age of American family vacations more. Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas.

This rich experience was one of the greatest of my childhood. Sorry for having written so much.

mamabird5o says: Now I'm going to have to read the book. My feeling is that the 1960's, when many of my fellow baby boomers were growing up, was a time when we were all still fairly innocent; I don't think I could have gotten away with a camping trip across the west in a pop-up camper with my girls, who were born in the mid-80's. And in an un-airconditioned car, no less. This rich experience was one of the greatest of my childhood.

An entertaining cultural history of the American family vacation during the height of its popularity from 1945 to 1973. Reveals the ways in which the ritual of the family road trip, for most middle-class Americans became a way of defining what it meant to be (and become) American. When TV celebrity Dinah Shore sang "See the USA in your Chevrolet," 1950s America took her to heart. Every summer, parents piled the kids in the back seat, threw the luggage in the trunk, and took to the open highway. Chronicling this innately American ri. Specifications.

The Golden Age of American Family Vacations (Culture America): Susan Sessions Rugh. Susan Sessions Rugh has written a great book about the history of the family camping or at least car driving adventure. Read PDF Are We There Yet?: The Golden Age of American Family Vacations (CultureAmerica) - Unlimed acces book - By Susan Sessions Rugh. The book is called The Golden Age. While it may be easier to take the kids to Disney World, consider other family vacation destinations that you may not have been aware of or that may be off-the-beaten path. Road trips have come a long way. Are We There Yet?

Authors: Susan Rugh Susan Sessions Rugh .

Authors: Susan Rugh Susan Sessions Rugh. Rugh's book allows readers to relive those wondrous wanderings across the American landscape and to better understand how they helped define an essential aspect of American culture. Notwithstanding the rueful memories of discomforts and squabbles in a crowded car, those were magical times for many of the nation's families. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by University Press of Kansas.

American Discontent: The Rise of Donald Trump and Decline of the Golden Age.

By Susan Sessions Rugh. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2008. 240 pp. Notes, bibliography, index, photographs. ISBN: 978–0–700–61588–9. American Discontent: The Rise of Donald Trump and Decline of the Golden Age. By John L. Campbell. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018.

When TV celebrity Dinah Shore sang "See the USA in your Chevrolet," 1950s America took her to heart. Every summer, parents piled the kids in the back seat, threw the luggage in the trunk, and took to the open highway. Chronicling this innately American ritual, Susan Rugh presents a cultural history of the American middle-class family vacation from 1945 to 1973, tracing its evolution from the establishment of this summer tradition to its decline. The first in-depth look at post-World War II family travel, Rugh's study recounts how postwar prosperity and mass consumption—abetted by paid vacation leave, car ownership, and the new interstate highway system—forged the ritual of the family road trip and how that ritual became entwined with what it meant to be an American. With each car a safe haven from the Cold War, vacations became a means of strengthening family bonds and educating children in parental values, national heritage, and citizenship.Rugh's history looks closely at specific types of trips, from adventures in the Wild West to camping vacations in national parks to summers at Catskill resorts. It also highlights changing patterns of family life, such as the relationship between work and play, the increase in the number of working women, and the generation gap of the sixties.Distinctively, Rugh also plumbs NAACP archives and travel guides marketed specifically to blacks to examine the racial boundaries of road trips in light of segregated public accommodations that forced many black families to sleep in cars—a humiliation that helped spark the civil rights struggle. In addition, she explains how the experience of family camping predisposed baby boomers toward a strong environmental consciousness.Until the 1970s recession ended three decades of prosperity and the traditional nuclear family began to splinter, these family vacations were securely woven into the fabric of American life. Rugh's book allows readers to relive those wondrous wanderings across the American landscape and to better understand how they helped define an essential aspect of American culture. Notwithstanding the rueful memories of discomforts and squabbles in a crowded car, those were magical times for many of the nation's families.
Kiutondyl
Since I well remember my own family vacations during the 1940s and 1950s, "Are We There Yet?" naturally stoked my memory. Author Rugh evokes the rustic summer camps, roadside cabins that predated the oncoming flood of motels, and the absence of glitz and sameness that colors so much of the vacation landscape nowadays. A nostalgic read, with emphasis on the postwar Midwest, it should appeal to a wide range of readers, especially those over 60 and a younger set curious about what people did during the summers in "those days." A good sampling of vintage photographs accompany the text.
Windbearer
Good history of the American vacation from the backseat of the car onto American highways during post-World 2 America.
thrust
"Are We There Yet" may be a bit of a surprise for casual readers expecting a lighthearted look back at travel in the postwar era, as it's instead geared more towards a more scholarly audience. Susan Sessions Rugh instead focuses specifically on the evaluation of automobile travel in the postwar era and what it meant to specific segments of the population. While automobile travel was common before the war it exploded in popularity following it, spurring the growth of the travel and hospitality industries and domestic tourism, but it wasn't all lighthearted fun. As Rugh points out, it also introduced Americans into a potentially hostile environment they sometimes were ill-prepared for. And not all tourists were welcomed everywhere in a time of Jim Crow and segregation. Amongst one of the interesting developments Rugh explores is the creation of the Green Book which listed black friendly establishments and how that publication and those who used it wound up challenging both overt and subtle racism.

"Are We There Yet" is actually most interesting when it delves into more difficult issues, such as racism, segregation, and the mayhem of travel. It's also notable for omitting certain segments completely, such as the LGBT community, save for a brief mention; a fairly inexcusable oversight as the subject is not only ripe for discussion but because discrimination against them continued until fairly recent times. The appeal of "Are We There Yet" will likely be limited to historians and social scientists, but lay readers may find it an interesting read as well. Rugh's prose is quite accessible and the stories and topics she covers an insightful glimpse in our recent past.
Mataxe
I remember when my father got back from the Navy, we were loaded up in our car and drove for miles on our first family vacation when I was 5 yrs old. I love this eye opening historical book!
Zugar
Surprisingly very interesting. I read this for my History Seminar course and it was quite enjoyable.
GYBYXOH
It read as if she were trying to convince her white friends she was multicultural. It was racist and embarrassing.
Nawenadet
With its snappy title, I expected a lively, conversational work in the spirit of Erma Bombeck or Dave Barry, perhaps with a few celebrity reminiscences or interviews with retired tourist attraction operators mixed in with a broad discussion of the vacation trends that waxed and waned during the period in question (1947-1973). What we have instead is a college history professor who has taken her unedited research notes and thrown them on the page. There is not even the most rudimentary attempt to shape a narrative - reading this is literally like reading 184 pages of footnotes, with all the tedium that implies.
From the cover & title, I expected this book to be more Bill Bryson-esqe, full of interesting anecdotes. Instead, it was a heavily foot-noted & researched (cannot speak for the accuracy of the research) and humorless - more like a disertation. It was still interesting, just not "light" reading like the title would imply (with the exception of the last chapter).
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